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  1. #51
    Senior Member swordpath's Avatar
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    Raised around Christian conservatism by my father. My family (including extended) is rather interesting though when it comes to politics. Like my father, my grandfather (dad's side) was pretty conservative (although I don't think he was "Republican" like my dad is). My grandfather's (again, dad's side) two daughters (my aunts) are pretty damn left wing. They were teens during the hippie movement and did the whole "rebelling against the dad" thing, and they've kept their mindsets pretty much the same to present day and it still brought on harsh and spirited debates at family functions (just about all of them, haha) but my grandfather died xmas of last year and he was usually the most vehement in his opinions and most often outnumbered at the dinner table, so I don't see those much anymore. As for my mom's side -- I don't really get a chance to talk/see them much. My mother's parents are both dead but her father was an officer in the Air Force. I'm pretty sure he was remarkably conservative, living in South Carolina, serving in the military and all that jazz. I'm getting off track, with irrelevant information...

    So anyways, myself, I'm still formulating my opinions and they're still changing. I just make my own judgments and opinions. First of all, I'm independent politically and I consider myself "moderate." Economically, I'm mostly conservative and then middle of the line with a lot of social issues. I think a lot of government programs are a sham and that too many people are taking an advantage of the system and that there should obviously be a reform when it comes to welfare and some of the other social programs.

  2. #52
    No moss growing on me Giggly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lateralus View Post
    I was raised in a strict conservative Christian household. When I went to college (finally escaped my parents' sphere of influence), I started to move more left (though, I've never been a commie), which probably had more to do with me asserting my own individuality than anything else. Somewhere along the way, I started to realize that a lot of my new views didn't make any sense...I grew up. I still disagree with my parents on many issues (like abortion), but even the ones where we agree, my parents can't really explain why they believe the way they do, at least not coherently. I like to think that I don't just have a stance, I know why I have that stance.
    That's my story too, except my parents say they are liberal yet their views fall more in line with conservatives. I also claimed to be liberal just because my parents were and I knew nothing else. That's just how it was in my family and so I went along with it, no questions asked, until one day I really thought about it. Actually, it was a friend who pointed it out to me that I my views were actually more in line with conservatives, and trust me, I was offended and absolutely appauled at that (I was taught to be offended by conservatives) but then I opened my mind to the possibility and realize that it was stupid to live in denial and I haven't felt confused about what I believe in since.

  3. #53
    Minister of Propagandhi ajblaise's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by booyalab View Post
    Sorry, I know we might get off topic, but I can't let this slide....

    I know you'll just consider this to be an "exception" to the conservatives=racist rule, but I actually had more non-white than white friends in school.
    It's not a rule, but I'd point out massive urban/rural liberal/conservative divide, which no one can dispute exists. If you grow up around all different kinds of colors and cultures, you might be a little more open minded concerning people different to you and diversity might be something that seems OK. While if you grow up in white-ville Alabama, where people tend to be less tolerant of other races ethnic groups, your political views might just correspond to that and you won't exactly be a liberal diversity proponent.

    And this is even more off topic, but I can't see little booyalab rollin with little homies and essays, they weren't asians were they? Whatever they were, I bet you aren't against or are wary of diversity and multiculturalism, possibly because of were you grew up...or maybe you are.

  4. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by ajblaise View Post
    It's not a rule, but I'd point out massive urban/rural liberal/conservative divide, which no one can dispute exists. If you grow up around all different kinds of colors and cultures, you might be a little more open minded concerning people different to you and diversity might be something that seems OK. While if you grow up in white-ville Alabama, where people tend to be less tolerant of other races ethnic groups, your political views might just correspond to that and you won't exactly be a liberal diversity proponent
    Alabama may be an iffy state to use for that example, since it is a high percent black (Though I don't know enough Alabama to know how black people/white people are spread around the state.) A lot of states do have the "more white people in rural areas vs. cities" divide though.

  5. #55
    Minister of Propagandhi ajblaise's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zergling View Post
    Alabama may be an iffy state to use for that example, since it is a high percent black (Though I don't know enough Alabama to know how black people/white people are spread around the state.) A lot of states do have the "more white people in rural areas vs. cities" divide though.
    yeah, but I was talking about rural Alabama, a lot of southern states have cities with high black populations.

  6. #56
    Order Now! pure_mercury's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ajblaise View Post
    yeah, but I was talking about rural Alabama, a lot of southern states have cities with high black populations.
    There is a very high rural black population in Alabama. Black people dominate the so-called "Black Belt" region, which has a few cities (Montgomery being the largest, by far). A better example state would be my home state of Pennsylvania. I am a Philadelphian, and our city is "majority minority." About 45% is black, and we have had a ton of Asian and Latino immigrants in the last 20 years. Pittsburgh and its surrounding area has a lot of blacks, as well. The central part of the state is overwhelmingly white (except for the campus of Penn State University), although it is also now getting an influx of Latino migrant workers. The image of the South being full of poor white farmers in the rural areas is really outdated (the Appalachian/Ozark areas are the only places you really find that in this day and age). Black people make up a huge amount of the rural poor between East Texas and Maryland/Delaware.
    Who wants to try a bottle of merc's "Extroversion Olive Oil?"

  7. #57
    Minister of Propagandhi ajblaise's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pure_mercury View Post
    There is a very high rural black population in Alabama. Black people dominate the so-called "Black Belt" region, which has a few cities (Montgomery being the largest, by far). A better example state would be my home state of Pennsylvania. I am a Philadelphian, and our city is "majority minority." About 45% is black, and we have had a ton of Asian and Latino immigrants in the last 20 years. Pittsburgh and its surrounding area has a lot of blacks, as well. The central part of the state is overwhelmingly white (except for the campus of Penn State University), although it is also now getting an influx of Latino migrant workers. The image of the South being full of poor white farmers in the rural areas is really outdated (the Appalachian/Ozark areas are the only places you really find that in this day and age). Black people make up a huge amount of the rural poor between East Texas and Maryland/Delaware.
    i knew there were some blacks in rural areas but didn't think it was that much. i don't think rural Alabama, East Texas and Maryland/Delaware could have a high black rural percentage, compared to whites. they are only 14% of the total pop to start with and mostly live in cities.

  8. #58
    Order Now! pure_mercury's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ajblaise View Post
    i knew there were some blacks in rural areas but didn't think it was that much. i don't think rural Alabama, East Texas and Maryland/Delaware could have a high black rural percentage, compared to whites. they are only 14% of the total pop to start with and mostly live in cities.
    Spoken like a true Yankee! LOL Blacks make up over 26% of the population in Alabama (even higher in South Carolina, Mississippi, and Louisiana). In other parts of the country, black people tend to be in the major cities, but they still live in the country down South, along with major inner city areas like Atlanta and New Orleans.
    Who wants to try a bottle of merc's "Extroversion Olive Oil?"

  9. #59
    subterfugee Xann's Avatar
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  10. #60
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    This is an awesome thread. I have often asked this question to myself, because there seems to have just been a natural flow...like my politics have slowly materialised, like a picture which slowly becomes more clear and one day I woke up seeing what I do. (I will also paste this to my blog)

    I don't feel like my politics were influenced by my parents. What they may have been influenced by is the sense of identity I get from my family's socioeconomic status, and its noble history (so "where do I fit in to the great scheme?", "where do I come from?", "what makes me uniquely me?" and "what does this all mean? Is it a good thing?" - all 4ish questions really). Probably because of this, I feel an unusually strong attachment to the culture of my ethnic group for someone in my generation, as such thoughts are generally discouraged. I am also very contrarian and dismissive of what I see as the status quo - if a lot of people believe something, I am likely to take the opposite view. I very rarely will take anything I hear at face value and look for the hidden meanings and connections between people's words and actions.

    So, that's background which may have "primed" me in a certain way before I had any life experience.

    When I was at high school, I was an loner, an outcast. Other boys did not want to know me and treated me badly through social shaming and shunning, which reinforced the sense I'd always had of being different. It also taught me two things about the world which have always stayed with me:

    1. That you have a lot more power when you identify, are part of and work as a group than you do if you are alone.
    2. That the world is a zero-sum game, where we, and the groups we belong to, compete for resources, power (and as I would discover a little later, women).

    In my last two years of school I read very widely, both fiction and non fiction, as well as starting to compose my own music. My feeling of being a misunderstood outcast and hero was further reinforced through immersion in Hugo, Dumas and Bronte. I tried various philosophers on for size - Hume, Kant, Nietzsche. I also opened a YT account and started commenting on music. I made a friend, an older man in his 40s who was also into philosophy. This was the first big event for me, politically.

    He was an Objectivist, fan of Spinoza and very conservative on most issues. He was also an attorney and had a degree in physics. Most interesting man, and very intelligent. I am pretty sure he was an INTP cp6w5. Anyway he was part of a loose circle of Youtubers (this was 2010, at the time YT was a lot more user-friendly) and I quickly began to form my own political opinions. I dear say I sounded like an arrogant jerk but hanging out with a lot of opinionated middle-aged men online exposed me to a lot of different opinions I could reflect on. Sadly, my friend developed manic depression and I haven't talked to him since 2011. But I am very grateful to him, for the world he showed me.

    At the same time, I was becoming very challenging for my teachers in high school, because I knew more than they did and was developing some rather politically incorrect views. For example I questioned why it was we should have to study three Maori authors, simply because of their ethnicity, and why it was that Shakespeare's The Taming of the Shrew should be reinterpreted in a "feminist light" considering it is over 400 years old. When I got detention and no satisfactory answer I assumed it was because some peoples were inferior to others...and that nobody wanted to admit the truth.

    This was an epiphany for me because it calls so much of what we believe about humankind into question. We clearly aren't born "blank slates".

    So, I rejected liberalism utterly, as an immoral philosophy built on the envy of the weak for the strong. I also rejected mainstream conservatism, because it denied there were inherent differences between peoples' ability to succeed in life. I do still feel this way, but for different reasons than I did five years ago.

    From 2011 to 2013, I gradually, with hiccups, ups and downs and a dalliance here and there, arrived at roughly the positions I hold today, politically. However my attitude has softened a lot since - I feel I can understand why people might disagree with me and can see things from their perspective, even if I don't agree with it. A lot of what I said about women was born of ignorance and frustration, and my depression was getting worse and worse at the time. I do actually want to be there and help other people, mainly because, some of the assumptions I had made about people based on school turned out not to be true after all. There are good people in the world who will accept you for who you are, and it's a matter of finding some balance. This isn't something I would've said even a year ago, but I was still a virgin then, so...yeah...

    Maybe, I am just rediscovering parts of my nature I hid because I had such a traumatic adolescence. At 15 I vowed to shut off any empathy for humanity to protect myself from being treated badly again. As a child I was very sensitive and that did not help.

    I hold the views I do now mainly because I value what I've discovered and want to keep that life alive for my children, when I have them (hopefully soon). Traveling a lot has also opened my eyes to just how different, and morally backward people from other parts of the world are. I am determined to stand up for what I believe in and good luck to anyone who gets in my way.
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