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  1. #11
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    All in positions of power should be subject to scrutiny

  2. #12
    Diabolical Kasper's Avatar
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    Clearly there is only one reasonable answer: Ban all cameras!

  3. #13
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    Nobody who serves in a public capacity has a reasonable right to privacy with respect to the fulfillment of that service. When cops are off-duty, yeah, they have a right to not be taped. When they're on duty, their service should be a matter of public record. Period.

  4. #14
    Senior Member Lateralus's Avatar
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    Yes, exposing misbehavior gives aid and comfort to the enemy.
    "We grow up thinking that beliefs are something to be proud of, but they're really nothing but opinions one refuses to reconsider. Beliefs are easy. The stronger your beliefs are, the less open you are to growth and wisdom, because "strength of belief" is only the intensity with which you resist questioning yourself. As soon as you are proud of a belief, as soon as you think it adds something to who you are, then you've made it a part of your ego."

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beefeater View Post
    A motorcycle is a dangerous weapon.
    Not as dangerous as a regular car. Whether he was on a motorcycle or not is irrelevant.

    I don't blame the cop for brandishing a gun especially when he never pointed the gun at the motorcyclist.
    He basically approached the motorcyclist the same way a carjacker would… brandishing a firearm yelling, “Get off the motorcycle” Not to mention he was in plain clothes in an unmarked car and flashed no badge. Pulling a gun on certain people can cause an automatic reaction of instant panic. So if the motorcyclist would’ve panicked and made a reflex move to seeing a gun it could’ve ended in disaster.

    Yeah, he probably should of said "state police" first thing
    Not probably… He should’ve… And he probably should’ve been in an actual police car and maybe flashed one of those badge thingies too.

    but in the heat of the moment I can understand him trying to get rid of the current threat to his safety before establishing his authority.
    So basically what you’re saying then is that it’s okay to break protocol as long as it’s in “the heat of the moment?” It’s a police officer’s job to keep their cool in “the heat of the moment.” Then on top of that there wasn’t even a threat.

    Anyway he still says state police within 3 seconds of brandishing his gun.
    It was 5 seconds actually, they timed it… and that’s 4.5 seconds too long.

  6. #16
    LL P. Stewie Beorn's Avatar
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    Whatever. I'm not going to waste my time refuting you when I'm not positive about what police protocol was in place at that place and time. Suffice it to say you and I disagree on what is dangerous, what is reasonable, and what police actions are forgivable.

    In my mind whatever this trooper may have done wrong pales in comparison to what the state did wrong in the search and seizure of the motorcyclists home and property on a paper thin wiretapping charge.
    Take the weakest thing in you
    And then beat the bastards with it
    And always hold on when you get love
    So you can let go when you give it

  7. #17
    Senior Member wildcat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lark View Post
    I think this is one of those things which will become more and more widespread and nye on impossible to regulate, prevent or reign in.

    In the UK there's been a couple of incidents in which people, particularly young people, have filmed professionals on mobile phones or even just taken photographs and posted the material online sometimes unaccompanied by lies, sometimes with fairly serious lies, the teaching profession in particular has been hit hard with some people assaulted by strangers, social workers are another vulnerable group.

    Social workers have it real hard because I've known of groups of kids who've perhaps engaged in real serious reckless, risky behaviour, jeopardising their safety and that of other younger kids, possibly even taken a pop at an adult carer or social worker or hit them with a weapon, then their buddy gets some footage of what appears to be an adult screaming at a kid or knocking them on their behind and running off. How do you imagine that going down? Especially in a litigatious culture.

    This is just people going about their jobs and I dont think it should be viewed as an occupational hazard, although in saying that when I speak to people in a professional capacity or make records I always do so with a view to full disclosure, I dont engage in any doubletalk or behave in a way which will reflect badly on me personally or the profession I'm part of. When I make notes I imagine I'm going to be reading them back or letting them be read by whoever they are about or their carers or if need be solicitors.

    So maybe the cop could have conducted himself better but I dont like what I see here, if the guy was pulled over for a violation the attention has already been taken away from him, the police officer could have imagined his safety was going to be jeopardised with pics or footage of him posted to "Legitimate targets.com" or something like that, next thing you know he's out shopping or in a restaurant and someone takes a pop at him or slaps his kid.

    I reckon that the individuals who are in the role of authorities should be afforded the same protections, within reason, as any member of the public. Some of that can be good preventative interventions to govern the use of technology like this. A lot of people scoff or laugh at the propaganda airbrushing or photography of yesteryear, Stalin's disappearing of Trotsky from pictures of him with Lenin and the like as though they are now so sophisticated and not nearly as credulous but I really doubt that.

    We also live with the legacy of anti-authoritarian mutant messages, I'll explain what I mean by that, culture is transmited across generations but in the process it mutates, we're not all what the philosophers might call "reflective conservers of knowledge". So there's incredible ambiguity about authority per se, there's automatic assumptions of injustice, power is always guilty. Its a seperate topic altogether and I'll not go on about it but this is one of those ideologies with a small i which is totally pervasive and will colour anyones rewatching of footage or consideration of photos or recordings.
    Power is guilty by definition.

  8. #18
    Reason vs Being ragashree's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wildcat View Post
    Power is guilty by definition.
    Yup.
    Look into my avatar. Look deep into my avatar...

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tantive View Post
    All in positions of power should be subject to scrutiny
    Interesting, does the scrutiny make one powerful? You see the paradox.

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by wildcat View Post
    Power is guilty by definition.
    Explain please.

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