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  1. #11
    Senior Member WoodsWoman's Avatar
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    Walden is not a good example of life in general.

    Your average rural life in the 'olden days' was filled with the things that made for survival: Canning, cooking, cleaning, hunting, cleaning the game, cooking or otherwise processing the game, making soap, feeding animals, slaughtering and processing some of those animals, cutting trees, chopping firewood, stacking the firewood (hopefully early enough in the year for it to dry well), haying, growing grain, making clothing (including boots/shoes and bedding [quilting, etc.]), mending, knitting, darning, milking the cow(s), churning butter, making cheese, collecting eggs, planting gardens, weeding, harvesting, canning, trimming lamps, ... ... ...

    If you didn't do it yourself it you didn't have it. If you didn't have some of these things you'd freeze or starve.

    Making soap was a three day process. Candles - from keeping bees to making good wicks.

    Try reading A Midwifes Tale - it's based on the diary of a woman on the Maine coast between 1785 and 1812.

  2. #12
    Senior Member WoodsWoman's Avatar
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    Duplicate post - please delete.

  3. #13
    Don't Judge Me! Haphazard's Avatar
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    It depends on who you were.
    -Carefully taking sips from the Fire Hose of Knowledge

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by WoodsWoman View Post
    Your average rural life in the 'olden days' was filled with the things that made for survival: Canning, cooking, cleaning, hunting, cleaning the game, cooking or otherwise processing the game, making soap, feeding animals, slaughtering and processing some of those animals, cutting trees, chopping firewood, stacking the firewood (hopefully early enough in the year for it to dry well), haying, growing grain, making clothing (including boots/shoes and bedding [quilting, etc.]), mending, knitting, darning, milking the cow(s), churning butter, making cheese, collecting eggs, planting gardens, weeding, harvesting, canning, trimming lamps, ... ... ...
    Even so, when the storage is full of wood and the pantry is full of food you can stop since there is nothing more to do. I think the cyclical schedule they had was better than this regular one we have now. There is a time to work like crazy and time to sit and think.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by nolla View Post
    Even so, when the storage is full of wood and the pantry is full of food you can stop since there is nothing more to do. I think the cyclical schedule they had was better than this regular one we have now. There is a time to work like crazy and time to sit and think.
    A time to weep, and a time to laugh; a time to mourn, and a time to dance?
    Your kisses, sweeter than honey. But guess what, so is my money.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by WoodsWoman View Post
    Walden is not a good example of life in general.

    Your average rural life in the 'olden days' was filled with the things that made for survival: Canning, cooking, cleaning, hunting, cleaning the game, cooking or otherwise processing the game, making soap, feeding animals, slaughtering and processing some of those animals, cutting trees, chopping firewood, stacking the firewood (hopefully early enough in the year for it to dry well), haying, growing grain, making clothing (including boots/shoes and bedding [quilting, etc.]), mending, knitting, darning, milking the cow(s), churning butter, making cheese, collecting eggs, planting gardens, weeding, harvesting, canning, trimming lamps, ... ... ...

    If you didn't do it yourself it you didn't have it. If you didn't have some of these things you'd freeze or starve.

    Making soap was a three day process. Candles - from keeping bees to making good wicks.

    Try reading A Midwifes Tale - it's based on the diary of a woman on the Maine coast between 1785 and 1812.
    Yeah I think in the winter time there was still a lot of stuff they had to do... It's can be easy to fall into the trap of idealizing life in the past.
    Your kisses, sweeter than honey. But guess what, so is my money.

  7. #17
    reborn PeaceBaby's Avatar
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    Since the average lifespan was much lower, I would think not.

    Life was hardly idyllic.
    "Remember always that you not only have the right to be an individual, you have an obligation to be one."
    Eleanor Roosevelt


    "When people see some things as beautiful,
    other things become ugly.
    When people see some things as good,
    other things become bad."
    Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching

  8. #18
    not to be trusted miss fortune's Avatar
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    I'm going to agree with Woods Woman as well... I grew up in a modern farming community and it's STILL really busy all of the time... and people can buy their soap from the store, buy grocieries and clothes from the store, women don't have nearly as many children to raise, you don't have to build your house, barn and wagon/mode of transportation. There's not nearly the concern about wild animals eating your livestock or making sure that you don't freeze to death overnight and we have dishwashers, laundry machines, plumbing and basically you don't always have to be super careful and make everything by hand

    Furthermore, if you had the misfortune of being a slave or an indentured servant, you probably didn't EVER have freetime... however, if you OWNED the slaves or intentured servant or had a nice portion of money set aside you probably had more free time
    “Oh, we're always alright. You remember that. We happen to other people.” -Terry Pratchett

  9. #19
    Don't Judge Me! Haphazard's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by whatever View Post
    Furthermore, if you had the misfortune of being a slave or an indentured servant, you probably didn't EVER have freetime... however, if you OWNED the slaves or intentured servant or had a nice portion of money set aside you probably had more free time
    Exactly, there's a dichotomy of if you had slaves/servants or if you were the slave/servant.
    -Carefully taking sips from the Fire Hose of Knowledge

  10. #20
    Senor Membrane
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    Yep, the children in the Nike factory are not equal to the owner of Nike.

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