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  1. #151
    Senior Member tinkerbell's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by oberon View Post
    Ann Arbour isn't typical. You can find a lot of roundabouts (also known as "rotaries") in the northeast, particularly around Boston.
    Sorry I never said AA had no roundabouts, but there wasn't many 0f there was some - its a realtively small town

  2. #152
    psicobolche tcda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Haphazard View Post
    What do French people have to pat themselves on the back for?

    What do American people not?
    unlike the you guys they've actually become world champions at a sport that someone other than them plays
    "Of course we spent our money in the good times. That's what you're supposed to do in good times! You can't save money in the good times. Then they wouldn't be good times, they'd be 'preparation for the bad times' times."

    "Every country in the world owes money. Everyone. So heere's what I dont get: who do they all owe it to, and why don't we just kill the bastard and relax?"

    -Tommy Tiernan, Irish comedian.

  3. #153
    Senior Member proximo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tcda View Post
    unlike the you guys they've actually become world champions at a sport that someone other than them plays
    LOL! Not to mention ... Voltaire, Rousseau, Foucault, Abelard and this lot... and fantastic wine, and Alexandre Dumas, and some really arse-kicking movies of unimaginable quality, and some of the finest tactical minds in history, the cave paintings at Lascaux, and (debatably) the country with the highest proportion of atheists in the world, some of the greatest and oldest universities, Victor Hugo, Louis Pasteur... the list goes on and on...
    I'm male and over 30, FYI.
    Preferences: 20% Extravert, 98% Intuitive, 68% Thinker, 17% Perceiving

  4. #154
    Administrator highlander's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by oberon View Post
    I doubt we should get up in arms over something so subjective.
    Quote Originally Posted by MacGuffin View Post
    Repeated testing!
    Quote Originally Posted by oberon View Post
    The article certainly seems to make a solid case that the best Californian wines are comparable to the best French wines... judged better in repeated blind taste tests, by experienced continental wine authorities no less.
    This is a very famous story. It was also in the 1970s. I think it is possible the French got a bit complacent. I don't hear anyone talking about the amazing Bordeaux vintages in the 1970s. I hear about 1982, 1989, 1990, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2009, etc.

    It is very subjective thing. I hear Italian wines are very good but I've had few of them. I have had many very good wines from California and France. I have also visited Napa on at least six occasions. On average, the French wine is simply better. Sorry.

    Don't quote studies. Just taste the stuff!!

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  5. #155
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    Quote Originally Posted by highlander View Post
    This is a very famous story. It was also in the 1970s. I think it is possible the French got a bit complacent. I don't hear anyone talking about the amazing Bordeaux vintages in the 1970s. I hear about 1982, 1989, 1990, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2009, etc.

    It is very subjective thing. I hear Italian wines are very good but I've had few of them. I have had many very good wines from California and France. I have also visited Napa on at least six occasions. On average, the French wine is simply better. Sorry.

    Don't quote studies. Just taste the stuff!!
    You're just wrong, as the link proved in repeated tastings.

  6. #156
    Administrator highlander's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MacGuffin View Post
    You're just wrong, as the link proved in repeated tastings.
    I'm frequently wrong. In this case, I'm not sure I'm being clear enough in my responses because it is clear you don't understand what I'm saying.
    I'm sure the results of the blind taste testing are accurate for repeated tastings of the wines produced in the early 1970s. I also think that was a long time ago.

    Have you ever drank any of the wines listed in the tastings you reference? These are the ones I have had:

    Château Mouton-Rothschild
    Château Montrose
    Château Leoville Las Cases
    Stags Leap
    Freemark Abby

    Though not vintages that old.

    Edit: I've actually been to Freemark Abby which is by far the worst of the bunch listed above. Not even in the same class.

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  7. #157
    RETIRED CzeCze's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Just Some Guy View Post
    Couple of people mentioned New York, specifically in comparison to Paris.

    I don't get it-- New Yorkers may not be as friendly as, say, Philadelphians, but they ain't that rude either. They're aggressive and loud, but aggressive and loud does not equal rude and snobby. Not sure where this myth of rude New Yorkers comes from-- too many movies maybe.

    A better US city for comparison's sake would be Boston, which genuinely is quite rude.
    Bolded part - so true! Good way to word it. NYC gets a bad rap, in general I think there is a communal/neighborly awareness and respect you find in the city in and people are surprisingly well mannered and know how to share public space. As opposed to a place like DC which is very polarized and stand-offish and people can be kinda country.

    Buuuut - Illadelphia?? Friendly? Friendlier??? LOL.
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  8. #158
    & Badger, Ratty and Toad Mole's Avatar
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    Smile L'Affaire Farewell

    "L'Affaire Farewell", illustrates perfectly that French language and French culture can change the world.

    Perhaps with a glass of fine French wine and an aromatic cheese, you might like to watch, "L'Affaire Farewell", and become a little French.

    Just click on -

    L’affaire Farewell Movie Trailer - AZ Movies

  9. #159
    Senior Member compulsiverambler's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Haphazard View Post
    You try to speak French in the US most likely they really will have no idea what you're saying. You try speaking English in France and they'll just pretend.
    This is probably one of the most talked about stereotypes of the French that we seem to have in the UK. As a small child it struck me as a bit paranoid the way people were so convinced that every one of them could speak English and just refused. We don't accuse them of snobbishness much that I've noticed, possibly because we expect relatively reserved behaviour with strangers as much as they do and can also be taken aback by the sense of nonhesitant familiarity (friendliness) characteristic of Americans and others.

    [YOUTUBE="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ULLfH5O8wS0"]English sketch[/YOUTUBE]

  10. #160
    Senior Member lowtech redneck's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by compulsiverambler View Post
    We don't accuse them of snobbishness much that I've noticed, possibly because we expect relatively reserved behaviour with strangers as much as they do and can also be taken aback by the sense of nonhesitant familiarity (friendliness) characteristic of Americans and others.
    1.) This probably has a lot to do with it; what is considered polite in one culture is considered standoffish in another.

    2.) Do British people really stress the first syllable of 'garage'? I somehow never noticed that before...

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