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  1. #121
    Administrator highlander's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Curzon View Post
    True, Ob is correct. A research was made to see who makes the best and US beat France 4 to 1.

    California specifically. Does California make wine? Are they famous for it?
    Yes well there have been books written about this - the great blind taste tests. It's like the TV commercial that said Pepsi (too syrupy) is better than Coke. No.

    My opinion is that the French are the best winemakers in the world. As an example it is extremely difficult to find a wine in the US with the elegance of a fine Bordeaux. The best Burgandy in France will be better than Pinot from Oregon. In the US, we are learning to blend grapes whereas this has been done in France for a very long time. It's not that the US is bad - there are a lot of good wines. There is also a lot of horrid stuff. The thing is if you go to a restaurant in France, you will never get horrid wine whereas you do in the US all the time because most people do not have very refined tastes. So, the wine there is differentiated on the low end and the high end. It is partly why there is such a high price paid for the best French wine - it is because it is the best. Napa is getting better. Oregon is up and coming. Argentina is producing something differentiated with their top end Malbecs.

    A simple test - forget the studies. Judge for yourself. Buy a Camus or high end Stags Leap from California. Compare it to a Montrose, Leoville Las Cases, Les Forts de LaTour, or Lynch Bages. Try an excellent vintage like 2000 or 2003. You will notice the difference. Throw in an Achaval Ferrer Finca Altamira or Nicolas Catena Zapata from Argentina if you really want something different and an incredible value for exceptional quality.

    Actually maybe I will try this. It sounds like fun.

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  2. #122
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    Quote Originally Posted by Haphazard View Post
    Why do French people like Obama so much? Is it because he has a good-looking wife?
    He does? I only know of the homely one, Michelle.


  3. #123
    Senior Member proximo's Avatar
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    If we're talking wine, IMO the only serious competition for France is Italy. The Romans brought it to France, after all
    I'm male and over 30, FYI.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fecal McAngry View Post
    He does? I only know of the homely one, Michelle.

    well, not everyone has the same taste in women... You know like some guys might consider a chick with a mustache kinda homely whereas other guys might dig that sort of thing - I guess.

  5. #125
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    I must add that it is not very smart to stereotype a whole nation the same way we have successfully done to the Muslims.

    I am sure there must be mostly non snobbish French than snobbish french.

  6. #126
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    Quote Originally Posted by Curzon View Post
    I must add that it is not very smart to stereotype a whole nation the same way we have successfully done to the Muslims.

    I am sure there must be mostly non snobbish French than snobbish french.
    It's unfortunate that most people are unable to do this.

  7. #127
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    Quote Originally Posted by spin-1/2-nuclei View Post
    It's unfortunate that most people are unable to do this.
    *Pats my own back*

  8. #128
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    I personally think the french and americans have more in common than a german compared to any of the two.

    I was a bit surprised, when I came to visit the grandparents of my girlfriend in Nord-Pas-De-Calais in northern France, the little villaged they lived in looked like how I would imagine a little american village of this size with having my knowledge from movies only. The architecture, the style the houses were arranged ( like the mailbox next to the main street ) and I've even seen in someones car park having a whole set of new and shiny tools he obviously never uses but the garage was full of them .

    My personal knowledge of french people is somewhat limited. Tho thru my girlfriend I prolly do now 200% more about them than the average german.

    I got my gfs grandparents to know as absolutely hospitale people and tho I cant speak a word in french, we managed somehow. They are very family oriented and curious people those are traits I really like. Her grandma is like 80 years old and she hangs out on youtube *lol*. I was very wsurprised to see this, cause I thought they may be rather conservative.

    Other than that I have gotten to know french people as great inventors. French car companies have patented a lot of nice gadgets other people couldnt think of. One of them is the harmonic drive gearbox that lets the car drive as if it has no gears and I think security systems like ESP or ASR mainly go back to french inventors.

    And then there's the bathroom. Magnificient ! I've never seen an american bathroom, so you guys maybe are used to it, but I wasnt when I went into a french bathroom. Regarding hygene there aint many inventions left not already made by the french. Many of them are real time savers in the mornings and others are highly practical, like the mechanical box you put in your shower and on keypress it gives out shampoo for the hair or douche gel for the body. This kind of fixation on beauty products most prolly dates back to the times of Louis the sun king, where they all lived somewhat more dirty .

    There are tho some things about the french I dont understand aswell. For example last time on the Eurovision song-contest, which is a european-wide song contest, every country gave their points for the other ones in the english language. Only the french had to do it in french. That's an attitude we call in german "Someone needs to get his sausage roasted seperatly on the barbecue" .

    But well its ok, France is a very traditional country and its what kept them alive over the centuries. Long before the warlords who lived in Germany back in the days decided to give up fighting about who has the longest p-ness, the french already formed a country and its especially reflected in their language: while I couldnt read german text books from only 60 years ago, the french language looks like it hasnt changed in the last 1000 years. I find this to be a cool thing regarding national identity.

    Which is another tangent to go off on, in Germany since WWII we have no real national identity. So to be a bit more proud for the things one is good at, is a thing one could learn from France.

    Another thing I found intresting was that in France everyone drives a Peugeot or Citroen only *lol*. Like 90% of the cars on the street were of that brand. Well they are both great brands and sell very good in Germany aswell, maybe the french do one day trust in foreign engineering aswell ( tho I wouldnt count on it ).

    A last thing I find a bit dangerous about french politics is their rather conservative attitude. I dont know France has like 50 nuclear power plants and no real wind energy converters of any kind. And that though a major part of their country is next to the Ocean and they could like build a huge parc of off-shore modules already and have them tested being already the worlds leading country when it comes to selling WECs.

    The Americans would've been good customers, cause they build the things like hell atm .

    It's a thing the french maybe need to change for themselves for the future, meaning to allow a bit innovation in their country to not loose huge business opportunities in the future due to public which is too conservative.

    Other than that the french are a cat who always falls on their feet and they are very loyal people, wouldnt hesitate to step in for the friends. Best and most trustworthy neighbours one could wish for in Europe
    [URL]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tEBvftJUwDw&t=0s[/URL]

  9. #129
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  10. #130
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    Quote Originally Posted by proximo View Post
    I found that with German. I took A-Level German (British equivalent level to roughly US first year college major) at school and was, if not fluent, then pretty close to it, but since then have almost completely lost the ability to compose sentences. I can still understand it passively, better written than spoken, but I've lost about 60% of the ability I used to have to speak German, exactly because I never got the opportunity to use it, and on the rare times when I did, the Germans would all switch to English the moment I made one mistake.

    I think, in English speaking cultures, there's a lot of cultural hangover from the days when, in England, French was the language of the aristocracy. Even after the aristocracy started to speak English in everyday life, it was still the case that fluency in French was a marker of and essential must-have for a person of "quality", and education and literature was exclusively in Latin and French, with English being regarded as an inferior, "peasant" language.

    Even long after Shakespeare et al rehabilitated English into a respectable, internationally usable language, the sorta inferiority complex still hangs over, and I think is largely behind a lot of the knee-jerks and automatic labelling of all things French as "posh" and "élite". I've seen pamphlets from as late as the 19th century, that were written for the express purpose of trying to convince scientists, professors and the like, that it was now "okay" to use English as a medium for their written literature. It's a mistake to underestimate how far back the English cultural memory goes... ffs, every time England plays France at any sporting event, the English tabloids are wheeling out the Agincourt/Waterloo references!

    And where the English took their empire, and their language, they also took their hangups and prejudices and left them behind for people who had no reason to adopt them and no memory of why they were there. But... people do love a good bit of "us and them", they don't take much persuasion to take up the communal pitchfork
    By the way: if you talk in german to a german and he starts to speak english with you, it's to make the conversation more easy for you. In Germany 90% of the population speaks english and therefore its no problem to talk in english ( given the fact aswell that both languages are very close to each other and some things especially in business are just better said in english ).

    But if you want to talk german, just ask for it, it's no problem. Tho most probably you will be hard to understand cause american dialects are very hard to understand most of the times .

    but dont worry, it could be worse. And this goes out to the french not daring to speak english aswell. It can always be worse, like presented here:

    ( he's a minister in the european parliament and he's swabian hahaha ):

    [YOUTUBE="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-RrEQ8Ovw-Q&feature=related"].[/YOUTUBE]
    [URL]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tEBvftJUwDw&t=0s[/URL]

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