User Tag List

First 12345 Last

Results 21 to 30 of 102

  1. #21
    What is, is. Arthur Schopenhauer's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    MBTI
    INTJ
    Enneagram
    5
    Socionics
    INTj
    Posts
    1,158

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Beefeater View Post
    Also, america may be religious, but I don't think its very christian...
    Christianity is a religion.
    INTJ | 5w4 - Sp/Sx/So | 5-4-(9/1) | RLoEI | Melancholic-Choleric | Johari & Nohari

    This will not end well...
    But it will at least be poetic, I suppose...

    Hmm... But what if it does end well?
    Then I suppose it will be a different sort of poetry, a preferable sort...
    A sort I could become accustomed to...



  2. #22
    Senior Member Robopop's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    MBTI
    INTP
    Enneagram
    5w4 sp/sx
    Socionics
    ILE
    Posts
    690

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Beefeater View Post
    Also, america may be religious, but I don't think its very christian... particularly in the "bible belt."
    It is only your personal opinion that the United States is not very christian,the statistics say otherwise.

    I think the world and capitalism would do just fine without christianity.

  3. #23
    LL P. Stewie Beorn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    4,805

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MagnificentMind View Post
    Christianity is a religion.
    I heartily agree. My point is I don't think many people in america have a very strong understanding of the bible and so their behavior and beliefs are not in accord with the bible. While on a personal level I don't think an individual can be more or less christian they either are or are not a christian. I do think a society can be more or less christian and that can be measured by how the beliefs of christians and the populace on a whole actually match up with scripture.

    I think america is less christian than it was 200 years ago because the beliefs of the Christians and everyone else do not match up with scripture very often.

    So they may be religious, but it's not christianity they are practicing.

    I'm glad this topic came up.

    I was given this book a year ago:



    But, I have yet to read it... now I'm going to be spending the next day or two reading it.
    Take the weakest thing in you
    And then beat the bastards with it
    And always hold on when you get love
    So you can let go when you give it

  4. #24
    What is, is. Arthur Schopenhauer's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    MBTI
    INTJ
    Enneagram
    5
    Socionics
    INTj
    Posts
    1,158

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Beefeater View Post
    I heartily agree. My point is I don't think many people in america have a very strong understanding of the bible[...]
    Agreed - "people in america", being Christians.
    INTJ | 5w4 - Sp/Sx/So | 5-4-(9/1) | RLoEI | Melancholic-Choleric | Johari & Nohari

    This will not end well...
    But it will at least be poetic, I suppose...

    Hmm... But what if it does end well?
    Then I suppose it will be a different sort of poetry, a preferable sort...
    A sort I could become accustomed to...



  5. #25
    LL P. Stewie Beorn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    4,805

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MagnificentMind View Post
    Agreed - "people in america", being Christians.
    ?
    I'm not sure I understand.

    My point is that america is a country inhabited largely by people who call themselves christians, but who do not practice christianity.
    Take the weakest thing in you
    And then beat the bastards with it
    And always hold on when you get love
    So you can let go when you give it

  6. #26
    What is, is. Arthur Schopenhauer's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    MBTI
    INTJ
    Enneagram
    5
    Socionics
    INTj
    Posts
    1,158

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Beefeater View Post
    ?
    I'm not sure I understand.

    My point is that america is a country inhabited largely by people who call themselves christians, but who do not practice christianity.
    I also think that many Christians lack a strong, and founded understanding of the Bible; this fact reveals itself, continuously and often, especially amongst certain evangelical denominations, if not all of them. I was personally raised in this sort of religious subgroup, and I found the whole experience and the teachings lacking, especially after I began to delve into the other religious subgroups shortly after becoming an atheist. I've seen many interesting debates between Christians, primarily via Youtube, that also enhanced my view on this subject, as, often, this certain group of pastors, well-read in the Bible, would have to refute the emotional tirades of earnest yet naive Christians that were expressing something contradictory to the Bible or to the nature of god, or to whatever. It was an extremely interesting thing to watch them go at it.

    Also, I am one to question the goodness of religion, entirely. I think it does more harm than good, honestly. Would America be so great if men behaved as true Christians? I wonder.
    INTJ | 5w4 - Sp/Sx/So | 5-4-(9/1) | RLoEI | Melancholic-Choleric | Johari & Nohari

    This will not end well...
    But it will at least be poetic, I suppose...

    Hmm... But what if it does end well?
    Then I suppose it will be a different sort of poetry, a preferable sort...
    A sort I could become accustomed to...



  7. #27
    Order Now! pure_mercury's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    MBTI
    ESFJ
    Posts
    6,946

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MagnificentMind View Post
    I also think that many Christians lack a strong, and founded understanding of the Bible; this fact reveals itself, continuously and often, especially amongst certain evangelical denominations, if not all of them. I was personally raised in this sort of religious subgroup, and I found the whole experience and the teachings lacking, especially after I began to delve into the other religious subgroups shortly after becoming an atheist. I've seen many interesting debates between Christians, primarily via Youtube, that also enhanced my view on this subject, as, often, this certain group of pastors, well-read in the Bible, would have to refute the emotional tirades of earnest yet naive Christians that were expressing something contradictory to the Bible or to the nature of god, or to whatever. It was an extremely interesting thing to watch them go at it.

    Also, I am one to question the goodness of religion, entirely. I think it does more harm than good, honestly. Would America be so great if men behaved as true Christians? I wonder.

    I went to Catholic school from K-12, and I have found that most Catholics do not read the Bible. The teachers and priests/nuns don't even really encourage it much. Of course, the Roman Catholic Church teaches that its dogma AND the Bible are both divinely inspired, so you need to listen to them. They'll explain it all. . .
    Who wants to try a bottle of merc's "Extroversion Olive Oil?"

  8. #28
    LL P. Stewie Beorn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    4,805

    Default

    Gotcha.

    Quote Originally Posted by MagnificentMind View Post
    Also, I am one to question the goodness of religion, entirely. I think it does more harm than good, honestly. Would America be so great if men behaved as true Christians? I wonder.
    But without Christianity what is harmful and what is good becomes meaningless.

    Quote Originally Posted by Cornelius Van Til
    the non-Christian needs the truth of the Christian religion in order to attack it. As a child needs to sit on the lap of its father in order to slap the father's face, so the unbeliever, as a creature, needs God the Creator and providential controller of the universe in order to oppose this God.
    Take the weakest thing in you
    And then beat the bastards with it
    And always hold on when you get love
    So you can let go when you give it

  9. #29
    What is, is. Arthur Schopenhauer's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    MBTI
    INTJ
    Enneagram
    5
    Socionics
    INTj
    Posts
    1,158

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Beefeater View Post
    But without Christianity what is harmful and what is good becomes meaningless.
    I think these actions obtain even more meaning in the absence of an eternal reward, simply because, to do good, in the midst of this seemingly great despair, requires an honest desire to be good, not for oneself, but for others, and for future generations. To me, this idea of god, saps the worth out of the action itself. In a god world, the action of being good, without god, becomes meaningless, thus god renders good meaningless, himself.

    Originally Posted by Cornelius Van Til
    the non-Christian needs the truth of the Christian religion in order to attack it. As a child needs to sit on the lap of its father in order to slap the father's face, so the unbeliever, as a creature, needs God the Creator and providential controller of the universe in order to oppose this God.
    Won't disagree with the fact that it is hard to debate god without talking about him.
    INTJ | 5w4 - Sp/Sx/So | 5-4-(9/1) | RLoEI | Melancholic-Choleric | Johari & Nohari

    This will not end well...
    But it will at least be poetic, I suppose...

    Hmm... But what if it does end well?
    Then I suppose it will be a different sort of poetry, a preferable sort...
    A sort I could become accustomed to...



  10. #30
    Senior Member wildcat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    MBTI
    INTP
    Posts
    3,619

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lark View Post
    Or some similar religious system.

    I'm wondering if the whole idea of a sinners or saint's reward, sometimes mockingly dawbed "Pie in the Sky", where proven to be fundamentally erroneous what the social and particularly economic implicatios would really be.

    Not to be fatalist but I think that the dream of an earthly reward or paradise bought and paid for, a time of rest, is out of the reach of almost everyone. Even if its some what unconscious or agnostic the idea of an eventual or afterlife reward provides some consolation in that context.
    I do not think so.
    Reward on earth is short lived.
    Voracity does not set bounds. Greed has no limit.

Similar Threads

  1. Can you live without internet?
    By Oaky in forum The Bonfire
    Replies: 79
    Last Post: 11-10-2009, 02:15 PM
  2. Can we survive Global Capitalism?
    By coberst in forum Philosophy and Spirituality
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 07-22-2009, 09:31 AM
  3. Could you survive without spirituality?
    By Virtual ghost in forum Philosophy and Spirituality
    Replies: 83
    Last Post: 12-20-2008, 07:16 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO