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  1. #21
    Ghost Monkey Soul Vizconde's Avatar
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    Great, new fodder for anxiety. I can dwell on seeing myself in the future accepting a plea bargain of one day in jail for some misdemeanor of being drunk and grabbing someones ass and having my jailers never let me out. "I knew I should have taken the second option of two days for 'drunk in public'! Ahhhhhhhh".

    What kind of slippery slope will this precedent cause. OK you plead guilty to a speeding ticket but now that you plead guilty instead of the $200 fine we are going to but you in a box with a large angry and horney man named Bruno for eternity. He is especially agree because he was promised he would make it to his 15th anniversary High School Reunion by the district attorney and we told him we changed our mind and he has to spend the day with you instead.
    I redact everything I have written or will write on this forum prior to, subsequent with and or after the fact of its writing. For entertainment purposes only and not to be taken seriously nor literally.

    Quote Originally Posted by Edgar View Post
    Spamtar - a strange combination of boorish drunkeness and erudite discussions, or what I call "an Irish academic"

  2. #22
    Feline Member kelric's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by oberon View Post
    I don't think any person ought to be incarcerated longer than the length of time to which they have been sentenced under due process. If you want to keep them in jail for life without parole, sentence them to life without parole... otherwise, no.

    Because if you don't do things this way, you hand the government a tool they can use to keep people in jail for as long as they want to. And if you think this tool would only ever be used against people who molest children, well... I humbly disagree.
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

  3. #23
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    That's really great. Especially since child molesters tend to have the highest rate of recidivism of all sexual predators.

  4. #24
    Habitual Fi LineStepper JocktheMotie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pure_mercury View Post
    The irony is that sex offenders are actually LESS likely to re-offend than most other types of criminals.
    Quote Originally Posted by 01011010 View Post
    That's really great. Especially since child molesters tend to have the highest rate of recidivism of all sexual predators.
    i iz confuzzled



  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by JocktheMotie View Post
    i iz confuzzled
    CSOM Publications - Recidivism of Sex Offenders

  6. #26
    Senior Member Chunes's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by oberon View Post
    I don't think any person ought to be incarcerated longer than the length of time to which they have been sentenced under due process. If you want to keep them in jail for life without parole, sentence them to life without parole... otherwise, no.

    Because if you don't do things this way, you hand the government a tool they can use to keep people in jail for as long as they want to. And if you think this tool would only ever be used against people who molest children, well... I humbly disagree.
    +1
    "If you would convince a man that he does wrong, do right. But do not care to convince him. Men will believe what they see. Let them see."
    Thoreau

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  8. #28
    LL P. Stewie Beorn's Avatar
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    It should be noted that technically civil commitment and imprisonment for a crime are two different things. Although being committed to an institution is arguably worst.

    I really haven't formed a full opinion... I don't have all the facts and I haven't fully read the opinion.

    Obviously I, like everyone, else initially was bothered by the idea of keeping people incarcerated beyond the time of their initial judgment. But when there is a 7-2 decision where Roberts and Alito agree with Ginsberg and Stevens one has to pause and wonder if there isn't a good reason behind the decision.

    After a little research I found that Civil commitment of sex offenders after initial imprisonment is nothing new.

    In 1997 SCOTUS held in Kansas v. Hendricks that : Civil commitment of a sexually violent predator based on past sexually violent behavior and present dangerous mental condition did not violate due process and did not constitute double jeopardy.

    In this decision Scalia and Thomas were in the majority. Stevens and Breyer dissented.

    This decision was based on state statutes. The current decision was on a federal statute. So the question in this case was not a question of the rights of prisoners to go free after serving their time, but whether the federal government has the power to enact similar statutes under the "necessary and proper clause."

    I might post more later when I gather my thoughts on the subject.
    Take the weakest thing in you
    And then beat the bastards with it
    And always hold on when you get love
    So you can let go when you give it

  9. #29
    Senior Member Lateralus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beefeater View Post
    It should be noted that technically civil commitment and imprisonment for a crime are two different things. Although being committed to an institution is arguably worst.

    I really haven't formed a full opinion... I don't have all the facts and I haven't fully read the opinion.

    Obviously I, like everyone, else initially was bothered by the idea of keeping people incarcerated beyond the time of their initial judgment. But when there is a 7-2 decision where Roberts and Alito agree with Ginsberg and Stevens one has to pause and wonder if there isn't a good reason behind the decision.

    After a little research I found that Civil commitment of sex offenders after initial imprisonment is nothing new.

    In 1997 SCOTUS held in Kansas v. Hendricks that : Civil commitment of a sexually violent predator based on past sexually violent behavior and present dangerous mental condition did not violate due process and did not constitute double jeopardy.

    In this decision Scalia and Thomas were in the majority. Stevens and Breyer dissented.

    This decision was based on state statutes. The current decision was on a federal statute. So the question in this case was not a question of the rights of prisoners to go free after serving their time, but whether the federal government has the power to enact similar statutes under the "necessary and proper clause."

    I might post more later when I gather my thoughts on the subject.
    It's a bad policy regardless of how long or under what circumstances it's been carried out.
    "We grow up thinking that beliefs are something to be proud of, but they're really nothing but opinions one refuses to reconsider. Beliefs are easy. The stronger your beliefs are, the less open you are to growth and wisdom, because "strength of belief" is only the intensity with which you resist questioning yourself. As soon as you are proud of a belief, as soon as you think it adds something to who you are, then you've made it a part of your ego."

  10. #30
    Senior Member Shimmy's Avatar
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    Over here in Holland we have special rehabilitation clinics where you may be sentenced to after your jail time. This usually is for a previously determined period of time but it can be indefinitely. Psychiatrists then determine your fate, whether you are allowed outside, whether you have to come back again at all, or whether you have to check in regularly etc. It is even possible for criminals to be grounded with an electronic tagging system that goes off when they leave their house.

    The system is causing a lot of debate however, as recently a sex-slave trader got a psychiatrists permission to visit the birth of his son at a hospital and could flee to Turkey without difficulty. During the trial he had sworn revenge on the witnesses, most of whom were his former victims as well.
    (removed)

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