User Tag List

First 12345 Last

Results 21 to 30 of 42

  1. #21
    Member Stol11's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    MBTI
    ENTJ
    Posts
    43

    Default

    I'm not Conservative (actually a Lib Dem) but I think we got the best out of a bad situation. 'Damning the English'' is such a stupid remark. Was Labour wonderful? No, they have done an appalling job, throwing money at everything that moved, creating a surveillance state, being even more obsessed with the USA than previous administrations. Most people voted Labour blindly because it was what they had always done, I suspect none of them voted for the actual policies. Unless they believed that ridiculous Labour campaign that basically said voting Conservative will give you Cancer. They deserved to lose and I’m bloody glad they did. Shame they weren’t destroyed so the Liberals could take their position as the true progressive force.

  2. #22
    Crazy Diamond Billy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    MBTI
    INFJ
    Posts
    1,196

    Default

    Good for the British people, finally reclaiming their balls. Time to close your borders too.
    Ground control to Major Tom

  3. #23
    @.~*virinaĉo*~.@ Totenkindly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    MBTI
    FREE
    Enneagram
    594 sx/sp
    Socionics
    LII Ne
    Posts
    42,333

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Billy View Post
    Good for the British people, finally reclaiming their balls. Time to close your borders too.
    Arizona's giving out tips, if the Brits need any advice.
    "Hey Capa -- We're only stardust." ~ "Sunshine"

    “Pleasure to me is wonder—the unexplored, the unexpected, the thing that is hidden and the changeless thing that lurks behind superficial mutability. To trace the remote in the immediate; the eternal in the ephemeral; the past in the present; the infinite in the finite; these are to me the springs of delight and beauty.” ~ H.P. Lovecraft

  4. #24
    Don't Judge Me! Haphazard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    MBTI
    ENFJ
    Posts
    6,707

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jennifer View Post
    Arizona's giving out tips, if the Brits need any advice.
    Just try to avoid the phrase "show me your papers," every time you do that you have to pay ten cents (.07 £) to surviving Nazis.
    -Carefully taking sips from the Fire Hose of Knowledge

  5. #25
    & Badger, Ratty and Toad Mole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    18,531

    Smile Croquet

    I walk past the British Embassy every day. It's in pride of place in our National Capital and next to the Croquet Club.

    I often stroll through the Croquet Club and toy with joining. So to ingratiate myself I make a remark about pink flamingoes and this elicits a smile and a witty reply. And I can't help but be impressed by their sense of humour.

  6. #26

    Default

    Sounds a bit like down at the RSA.

  7. #27
    Senior Member Survive & Stay Free's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    MBTI
    ESTJ
    Enneagram
    9 so/sx
    Posts
    21,633

    Default

    And Damn their budget to hell too!!

    I want another Jacobin uprising!!

  8. #28
    Senior Member Survive & Stay Free's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    MBTI
    ESTJ
    Enneagram
    9 so/sx
    Posts
    21,633

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Stol11 View Post
    I'm not Conservative (actually a Lib Dem) but I think we got the best out of a bad situation. 'Damning the English'' is such a stupid remark. Was Labour wonderful? No, they have done an appalling job, throwing money at everything that moved, creating a surveillance state, being even more obsessed with the USA than previous administrations. Most people voted Labour blindly because it was what they had always done, I suspect none of them voted for the actual policies. Unless they believed that ridiculous Labour campaign that basically said voting Conservative will give you Cancer. They deserved to lose and I’m bloody glad they did. Shame they weren’t destroyed so the Liberals could take their position as the true progressive force.
    We can but hope and pray.

  9. #29
    psicobolche tcda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    MBTI
    intp
    Enneagram
    5
    Posts
    1,292

    Default

    I'm watching the Tory scum (yellow and blue varieities) trying to worm their way out of it on tv now.

    The best question was the one they can't asnwer "why are low and average income workers to be forced to pay for a crisis that the bankers caused?"

    The idea of the Liberals as a "true progressive force" is a funny one. This is the same party that wants to outlaw the right to strike in the public sector, right?
    "Of course we spent our money in the good times. That's what you're supposed to do in good times! You can't save money in the good times. Then they wouldn't be good times, they'd be 'preparation for the bad times' times."

    "Every country in the world owes money. Everyone. So heere's what I dont get: who do they all owe it to, and why don't we just kill the bastard and relax?"

    -Tommy Tiernan, Irish comedian.

  10. #30
    psicobolche tcda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    MBTI
    intp
    Enneagram
    5
    Posts
    1,292

    Default

    Good political analysis of the budget:

    LENIN'S TOMB

    A weak and nasty government




    The coalition government pitched its budget as a "progressive" one, ensuring that the burden of the austerity would be borne by the rich more than the poor. They even produced statistics to buttress this claim. If it was progressive, the rich weren't complaining. Bankers and businessmen applauded, while trade unionists expressed horror. No one believed the government's claim, the IFS cast serious doubt on it, and the FT has now produced its own statistical analysis, suggesting that the truth is exactly the reverse of what Osborne and Cable have claimed. It has been noted that the way in which cuts have been introduced, not as part of an express ideological commitment but in feigned sorrow and regret and with an attempt to package it as a progressive agenda, reflects the government's weakness. In fact, it expresses the weakness of the ruling class more generally, which does not have a coherent doctrine, an agreed solution, or even a faction with a determined agenda that is capable of asserting hegemony in their class and winning a measure of public support. In that respect, comparisons to the savage 1981 budget are misplaced.

    However, the government does have a strategy, which involves terrorising and cajoling people. They have talked up the need for cuts, quite relentlessly, once in office. They have tried to create a panic about the state of the public finances, simulating a Greek-style shock, though in fact the fiscal situation is better than it was thought it would be. They have used the budget to not merely cut, but threaten severe attacks on all non-ringfenced public spending, slashing an average of a quarter of the budget across departments. But their real target is, and always has been, welfare. They hope that by scaring people about what they will do to education, transport, justice, etc., they will gain support if they suddenly decide to shift more of the burden to welfare.

    And on the subject of welfare, quelle surprise, they are coming back for more. To begin with, promises enshrined in the coalition agreement that supposedly protected the poorest, such as the pledge not to attack bus travel subsidies and winter fuel payments for pensioners, are about to be tossed overboard. The welfare system is experiencing a phased attack, each additional blow intended to gain acquiescence and soften people up for more. The FT approves, editorialising in favour of more welfare cuts, and cuts in public sector pay, to avoid cuts in other areas such as justice and transport. The Economist agrees, bemoaning the fact that no party could publicly call for attacks on welfare during the election, but insisting that welfare must bear more of the burden. This is the ruling class in full battle cry - bail out the banks, pay off the bond traders, keep the basic infrastructure working, and make the poorest bear the cost.

    At the moment, polls show that the government's strategy is working, and that most people acquiesce in the cuts agenda. I would say 'support', rather than acquiesce, but this would imply that the agenda was being approved rather than met with terrorised compliance. The polls also suggest that the strategy would have been less successful had the Liberal Democrats not formed part of the Tory government. In fact, support for the budget is almost identical to the level of combined support for the two governing parties. Give them their due - the civil service played a blinder by negotiating this lash-up government.

    However, looked at from their perspective, the ruling class - whether they be in the Institute of Directors or in the highest levels of the state bureaucracy - must know how fragile this situation is. They have never taken polls as holy writ, but as materials to work with, sometimes to validate their policies as democratic, sometimes to plan strategy, sometimes to bludgeon their opponents with. They know how fragile any poll based 'consensus' is. They know that there is a real risk that this budget could produce the feared 'double dip' recession, and that even if it doesn't, public opinion could resile at the first sign of strikes and social unrest. They are also aware that their grasp on opinion has so far depended on allowing people to think that they personally might be spared the worst of the austerity, that the burden will be shifted to someone else. The actual experience of being clobbered, after a year or so of being protected by stimulus expenditure, is liable to shift opinion in dramatic and unexpected ways. And while support for the budget is fragile, opposition to it is extremely motivated. At the moment, socialists have between a quarter and a third of the public to work with, most of it probably concentrated in the public sector and in the unionised working class. That's the most important constituency, the one strategically best placed to resist, and we can build from that.
    "Of course we spent our money in the good times. That's what you're supposed to do in good times! You can't save money in the good times. Then they wouldn't be good times, they'd be 'preparation for the bad times' times."

    "Every country in the world owes money. Everyone. So heere's what I dont get: who do they all owe it to, and why don't we just kill the bastard and relax?"

    -Tommy Tiernan, Irish comedian.

Similar Threads

  1. If there was an Anglosphere based trade deal for the English speaking world to enter
    By ilikeitlikethat in forum Politics, History, and Current Events
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 01-22-2017, 10:22 AM
  2. Damn you facebook, damn you to hell
    By Survive & Stay Free in forum Politics, History, and Current Events
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 03-21-2012, 08:32 AM
  3. No rest for the wicked
    By MetalWounds in forum The Fluff Zone
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 02-10-2008, 02:42 PM
  4. 'Oh no, not another one!'
    By Koanashi in forum Welcomes and Introductions
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 07-31-2007, 07:36 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO