User Tag List

First 2101112

Results 111 to 117 of 117

  1. #111
    Oberon
    Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Halla74 View Post
    Similarly, I always heard that "America could feed the world tomorrow" but that hasn't happened.
    The notion that "America could feed the world tomorrow" isn't really true, and I'll tell you why.

    Yes, it's probably true that the US has the agricultural capacity and technical expertise to provide enough food output to supply the world's population. However, absent a business model that supports that level of output, we can't sustain it.

    Tractor fuel, electricity, equipment repairs, farm wages, fertilizer, cartage... all these things cost money. Farmers and agribusinesses do not charge money for the food they grow because they're filthy capitalists; they charge money for the food they grow because they have to meet expenses (and because they're filthy capitalists too, but only after the expenses are paid).

    Unless the world can pay market prices for the food we produce, we cannot feed the world. It's not a matter of being greedy... it's a matter of making enough return on our investment to buy seed wheat to plant in the spring, and fix the combine that went tits-up late in the summer, and truck in another semi-load of No. 2 Diesel to run in the tractors, and pay the farmhands Darrel and Lloyd and Earl for their time. If you can't do those things, the bank auctions it all off and you've got no farm.

    Having a practical business model is a necessity, because without it you do not have a going concern. Making a business self-sustaining can be as challenging as making a fusion reaction self-sustaining.

    And about that... the way fusion power plays out in the marketplace will depend heavily on what mode of fusion gets its breakthrough first.

  2. #112
    Artisan Conquerer Halla74's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    MBTI
    ESTP
    Enneagram
    7w8 sx/so
    Socionics
    SLE
    Posts
    6,927

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by oberon View Post
    The notion that "America could feed the world tomorrow" isn't really true, and I'll tell you why.

    Yes, it's probably true that the US has the agricultural capacity and technical expertise to provide enough food output to supply the world's population. However, absent a business model that supports that level of output, we can't sustain it.

    Tractor fuel, electricity, equipment repairs, farm wages, fertilizer, cartage... all these things cost money. Farmers and agribusinesses do not charge money for the food they grow because they're filthy capitalists; they charge money for the food they grow because they have to meet expenses (and because they're filthy capitalists too, but only after the expenses are paid).

    Unless the world can pay market prices for the food we produce, we cannot feed the world. It's not a matter of being greedy... it's a matter of making enough return on our investment to buy seed wheat to plant in the spring, and fix the combine that went tits-up late in the summer, and truck in another semi-load of No. 2 Diesel to run in the tractors, and pay the farmhands Darrel and Lloyd and Earl for their time. If you can't do those things, the bank auctions it all off and you've got no farm.

    Having a practical business model is a necessity, because without it you do not have a going concern. Making a business self-sustaining can be as challenging as making a fusion reaction self-sustaining.
    Great example, I like it.

    Quote Originally Posted by oberon View Post
    And about that... the way fusion power plays out in the marketplace will depend heavily on what mode of fusion gets its breakthrough first.
    I hear you, the answer is "it depends", but no matter what, like all other things in this world, the powers that be will be sure to do everything possible to continue holding the rights to fleecing the sheep (aka charging us for goods/services we need, like petroleum products, medical care, etc.) as much as possible.

    You are right, it is absolutely necessary for a business of any kind to be able to pay off its operating costs, labor, capital investments, interest, etc. in order to persist. To do that requires passing those costs onto consumers of thier costs/services, along with their desired profit margin. My point is that whatever variant of fusion comes to market first, he who holds the rights to its implementation will be doing more than just covering thier expenses, they will plug in a handsome profit for themselves. I guess if consumers are able to buy "fusion power" at rates that are materially lower than current rates for "petro power" then there is no reason to bitch.

    Cheers,



    -Halla
    --------------------
    Type Stats:
    MBTI -> (E) 77.14% | (i) 22.86% ; (S) 60% | (n) 40% ; (T) 72.22% | (f) 27.78% ; (P) 51.43% | (j) 48.57%
    BIG 5 -> Extroversion 77% ; Accommodation 60% ; Orderliness 62% ; Emotional Stability 64% ; Open Mindedness 74%

    Quotes:
    "If somebody asks your MBTI type on a first date, run". -Donna Cecilia
    "Enneagram is psychological underpinnings. Cognitive Functions are mental reasoning and perceptional processes. -Sanjuro

  3. #113
    Artisan Conquerer Halla74's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    MBTI
    ESTP
    Enneagram
    7w8 sx/so
    Socionics
    SLE
    Posts
    6,927

    Default

    Check This Out:



    According to that map, there are 3,858 oil platforms in the Gulf of Mexico, all just south of Texas, Alabama, and Louisiana.

    Today a CNN news broadcast reported that the remains of BP's Deepwater Horizon oil rig, a leaking pipe at the floor of the ocean 5,000 feet down, is releasing between 35,000 to 60,000 gallons of oil per day.

    The average of 35,000 and 60,000 is 47,500.

    If 3,857 oil platforms in the Gulf of Mexico can extract the average of the spill rate, then there are approximately 183,255,000 gallons of crude oil (= 3,858 * 47,500) being extracted from the Gulf of Mexico each day.

    One barrel of crude oil is 42 gallons in volume, and can produce about 19-20 (19.5 average) gallons of gasoline. (FROM: Gasoline FAQs - Energy Information Administration )

    So, about 3,573,472,500 of gasoline could be produced per day if all the crude oil pumped from the Gulf could be converted to gasoline within a 24 hour period, unlikely, but we're just tinkering with numbers here...

    An oil company takes about $2 per gallon (revenue) of every gallon of gasoline sold at retail prices (now about $2.70 per gallon?).

    Dissecting a gallon of gas - who get's what - Mar. 13, 2008

    and

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    So, oil company revenues (not profit) per day
    from drilling operations in the Gulf of Mexico could be near
    $7,146,945,000.

    Also from one of the links above:

    Who gets rich off $3 gas - who doesn't

    "Oil traders:
    While often blamed for pushing up prices, traders don't necessarily benefit from the high price of crude or gasoline; they profit from how much the price changes. Traders can get rich - as long as they bet correctly on whether prices will rise or fall.

    For example, an investment bank that makes a bet that the price of oil will rise makes money when oil prices go from $95 to $100 a barrel - or $100 to $95 if it bet the price will fall - not on the difference between production cost and trading price.

    "If you wanna keep your job, you gotta be more right than wrong," said John Kilduff, an energy analyst at the trading firm MF Global in New York, explaining how traders make their money.

    Gas stations:
    A surprisingly small amount goes to the guy who runs the station.

    Most service stations are independently owned and operated and take in between 7 and 10 cents for every gallon they sell, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

    That 7 to 10 cents going to the gas station isn't even profit. Out of that, station owners still have to pay leases, workers, and other expenses - leaving them with a profit of just a few cents. For the service stations, most profit comes from selling coffee, cigarettes, food and other amenities.

    These calculations are based off of EIA's most recent numbers, when gas was $3.04 a gallon. Gasoline hit another record nationwide average of $3.27 a gallon Thursday.

    Taxes:
    The government takes about 40 cents right off the top, with about 18 cents going to the feds. State taxes vary widely, but the national average is about 22 cents a gallon. Most of this money is used to build and maintain roads.

    Transportation:
    Getting the gas from refineries to service stations via trucks or pipelines - and the cost of storing it in large tanks - eats up another 23 to 26 cents per gallon.

    Refining:
    About 24 cents a gallon goes to refining companies like Valero (VLO, Fortune 500), Sunoco (SUN, Fortune 500) or Frontier (FTO, Fortune 500) that specialize in turning crude oil into gas. Some companies like ExxonMobil (XOM, Fortune 500), Chevron (CVX, Fortune 500) and ConocoPhillips (COP, Fortune 500) also have refining operations.

    Profits for refiners have been squeezed lately because the price they pay for oil has risen so much faster than the price they can sell the gas for. This helps explain why Big Oil companies -like Exxon, which actually buys more crude oil than it produces - haven't seen their profits rise as much as the price of oil.

    Crude oil:
    This is the most expensive part of a gallon of gas. Of every gallon of gas $2.07 from every gallon of gas goes to producers of crude like Chevron (CVX, Fortune 500), BP (BP), and smaller outfits like Anadarko (APC, Fortune 500) and Marathon (MRO, Fortune 500), or national oil companies controlled by countries like Saudi Arabia, Mexico or Venezuela.

    Crude currently trades around $110 a barrel, but breaking down the money in that barrel of oil is tough. Exploration and production costs, royalty payments - all a big part of $110 a barrel oil - vary widely country by country and project by project.

    "It's difficult to generalize; there's a whole spectrum of costs," said Ron Planting, an economist with the American Petroleum Institute, an industry trade group.

    They can range from $1 a barrel to produce crude in Saudi Arabia to over $70 a barrel to find, develop and pump oil in the deep water Gulf of Mexico or off the coast of Algeria, said Ann-Louise Hittle, an oil analyst with the energy consultants Wood Mackenzie.

    EIA estimates it costs U.S. oil companies an average of about $24 a barrel to find, develop and produce oil worldwide, but that doesn't include costs like transportation, administration, or income taxes - which can be substantial. While Exxon made $40 billion in 2007, a 60% increase from 2004, it paid $100 billion in taxes and royalties."


    -----------------------------------------

    Sick to your stomachs yet?

    -Halla
    --------------------
    Type Stats:
    MBTI -> (E) 77.14% | (i) 22.86% ; (S) 60% | (n) 40% ; (T) 72.22% | (f) 27.78% ; (P) 51.43% | (j) 48.57%
    BIG 5 -> Extroversion 77% ; Accommodation 60% ; Orderliness 62% ; Emotional Stability 64% ; Open Mindedness 74%

    Quotes:
    "If somebody asks your MBTI type on a first date, run". -Donna Cecilia
    "Enneagram is psychological underpinnings. Cognitive Functions are mental reasoning and perceptional processes. -Sanjuro

  4. #114
    Queen hunter Virtual ghost's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    MBTI
    INTJ
    Enneagram
    135 so/sp
    Posts
    8,697

    Default

    ^nothing really new to me.

  5. #115
    Don't Judge Me! Haphazard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    MBTI
    ENFJ
    Posts
    6,707

    Default

    They hydrogen bonds in urine break easier than in water.

    Just sayin'.
    -Carefully taking sips from the Fire Hose of Knowledge

  6. #116
    Queen hunter Virtual ghost's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    MBTI
    INTJ
    Enneagram
    135 so/sp
    Posts
    8,697

    Default

    I am curious since I am not from the region.

    If it happens that this spill causes alot of damage/problems on Cuba could that be considered as a act of invasion/attack ?

  7. #117
    Artisan Conquerer Halla74's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    MBTI
    ESTP
    Enneagram
    7w8 sx/so
    Socionics
    SLE
    Posts
    6,927

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Antisocial one View Post
    I am curious since I am not from the region.

    If it happens that this spill causes alot of damage/problems on Cuba could that be considered as a act of invasion/attack ?
    Not likely. France's air pollution has contributed to regions of Germany's forests being killed by many years of acid rain ("Waldstirben") and no invasion or counter attack has occurred.
    --------------------
    Type Stats:
    MBTI -> (E) 77.14% | (i) 22.86% ; (S) 60% | (n) 40% ; (T) 72.22% | (f) 27.78% ; (P) 51.43% | (j) 48.57%
    BIG 5 -> Extroversion 77% ; Accommodation 60% ; Orderliness 62% ; Emotional Stability 64% ; Open Mindedness 74%

    Quotes:
    "If somebody asks your MBTI type on a first date, run". -Donna Cecilia
    "Enneagram is psychological underpinnings. Cognitive Functions are mental reasoning and perceptional processes. -Sanjuro

Similar Threads

  1. Essential Oils and Natural Remedies
    By labyrinthine in forum Health and Fitness
    Replies: 29
    Last Post: 03-22-2017, 08:49 AM
  2. The Oil Spill is Only a Symptom
    By coberst in forum Philosophy and Spirituality
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 06-18-2010, 01:29 PM
  3. BP planned to consult dead man on oil spill's effects on marine life, and more
    By Haphazard in forum Politics, History, and Current Events
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 06-10-2010, 10:02 PM
  4. Geoff takes pictures on the Sussex Coast, Seven Sisters
    By Geoff in forum Home, Garden and Nature
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 05-11-2008, 07:49 AM
  5. Geoff takes his camera to the Cornish coast [further pics added]
    By Geoff in forum Home, Garden and Nature
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 06-23-2007, 08:35 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO