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Thread: Ban the Burqa

  1. #11
    Listening Oaky's Avatar
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    The burqa existed originally for cultural beliefs rather than religious however nowadays people associate it as a symbol for Islam. To ban the burqa is not to ban a symbol of Islam. It is to ban someone from using their own cultural methods.

  2. #12
    & Badger, Ratty and Toad Mole's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oakysage View Post
    The burqa existed originally for cultural beliefs rather than religious however nowadays people associate it as a symbol for Islam. To ban the burqa is not to ban a symbol of Islam. It is to ban someone from using their own cultural methods.
    If we follow the fashion of cultural relativism then we believe that all cultures are equal.

    However some cultures contradict each other, and so the equality of cultures becomes problematic.

    In fact it is the meeting of different cultures in the global village that leads to cognitive dissonance.

    So it is vital we learn to address this issue.

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    Senior Member Lateralus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Victor View Post
    I notice more and more muslim women are wearing the full burqa in Canberra.

    And those wearing the full burqa won't even speak to me in public, not even in the grounds of the University, where open discussion is part of University life. However I have spoken to their husbands.

    And it is becoming plain, at least to me, that the burqa is not just an item of religious clothing, but is the flag of Islam.

    The French President, Nicolas Sarkozy, wants to ban the burqa in public places.

    So do you think we should ban the burqa as well?
    No, banning these sorts of things has a net negative effect. This doesn't liberate women, it puts them into a more difficult situation (defy their religion/family or defy the state). It's also hypocritical. No society can claim to be "free" while banning these sorts of things.

    France is moving backwards.
    "We grow up thinking that beliefs are something to be proud of, but they're really nothing but opinions one refuses to reconsider. Beliefs are easy. The stronger your beliefs are, the less open you are to growth and wisdom, because "strength of belief" is only the intensity with which you resist questioning yourself. As soon as you are proud of a belief, as soon as you think it adds something to who you are, then you've made it a part of your ego."

  4. #14
    likes this gromit's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Victor View Post
    Maturity requires we do not take cognitive dissonance personally and that we learn to bear the emotional pain of cognitive dissonance in the interests of discovery.
    Interesting and probably true...
    Your kisses, sweeter than honey. But guess what, so is my money.

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    Listening Oaky's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Victor View Post
    If we follow the fashion of cultural relativism then we believe that all cultures are equal.

    However some cultures contradict each other, and so the equality of cultures becomes problematic.

    In fact it is the meeting of different cultures in the global village that leads to cognitive dissonance.

    So it is vital we learn to address this issue.
    This goes down to the individual rather than the culture as a whole. The individual always feels safe in his/her own culture and traditions. It's a sense of security. It would happen just the same as if one from western culture were to go to there culture. An australian woman would not go to somewhere like Saudi Arabia and wear the burka. They would wear what they normally wear in australia according to their own culture so they feel they can be themselves in foreign terrain.

  6. #16
    not to be trusted miss fortune's Avatar
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    OMG I'm on the same side as Lateralus

    If someone wants to dress in a hajib, LET THEM! With their religion and culture they wouldn't talk to a strange man (and you are a strange man in so many senses! ) even if they WEREN'T wearing one!

    Banning a cultural item of clothing from one culture only is very arbitrary and discriminatory- banning ALL cultural items of clothing is definitley the state interfering too much with people's private right to freedom of expression and their right to choose whichever religion they like... as machiavelli said, it's best to keep church and state seperate, because if combined they will corrupt and weaken one another (oh god... I'm on an uncharacteristic roll this evening! I quoted the INTJs favorite as well )
    “Oh, we're always alright. You remember that. We happen to other people.” -Terry Pratchett

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Victor View Post
    And those wearing the full burqa won't even speak to me in public
    Take a hint Victor, no means NO!

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    Quote Originally Posted by whatever View Post
    and you [Victor] are a strange man in so many senses!
    I am quite normal on campus and hold an emeritus position.

    What is sub-normal is believing in astrology or MBTI and the immaturity of responding to cognitive dissonance with ad hominem attacks.

  9. #19
    not to be trusted miss fortune's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Victor View Post
    I am quite normal on campus and hold an emeritus position.

    What is sub-normal is believing in astrology or MBTI and the immaturity of responding to cognitive dissonance with ad hominem attacks.
    was merely an observation, not an attack... I didn't say it was a BAD thing!

    and you needen't pull out your educational credentials on us- most of us hold at least one degree
    “Oh, we're always alright. You remember that. We happen to other people.” -Terry Pratchett

  10. #20
    Senior Member Jaguar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Victor View Post

    What is sub-normal is believing in astrology or MBTI and the immaturity of responding to cognitive dissonance with ad hominem attacks.
    Victor, it's impossible to take you seriously when you freely admitted you are in this forum to manipulate people's emotions by employing "cognitive dissonance."

    Quote Originally Posted by Victor View Post
    My purpose here is plain.
    My purpose is to create cognitive dissonance.
    I recognise that cognitive dissonance is emotionally painful.

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