User Tag List

First 12345 Last

Results 21 to 30 of 54

  1. #21
    Senior Member Lightyear's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    903

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by pure_mercury View Post
    Ummmm, really? The country that divides people into employment/education tracks in their teenage years doesn't have a class system?
    Not where I come from in the East of Germany. Even though my Dad works in a power station I would never think of myself as working class since I have never been brought up with these terms, they are meaningless to me. Also for example in England class doesn't necessarily depend on your job but on what the social standing of the family is that you were born into.

    The funniest thing is when German friends visit me in England I have to explain to them the concept of class ("Even though this woman isn't dressed like a working class woman once you hear her speak her accent will reveal what class she belongs to." etc), to them the concept is just as meaningless as to me and they are surprised that this categorisation still exists.

  2. #22
    Ginkgo
    Guest

    Default

    Should education base itself on learning how to function and work, or on how to "think" critically? I don't think they are conjoined, as thinking critically often impedes people from carrying out orders and vice versa.

    Computers usually need to be somewhat inactive in order to scan for viruses and maintain themselves. They can't do both simultaneously very well.

  3. #23
    Don't Judge Me! Haphazard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    MBTI
    ENFJ
    Posts
    6,707

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lightyear View Post
    Not where I come from in the East of Germany.
    What about in the West of Germany?
    -Carefully taking sips from the Fire Hose of Knowledge

  4. #24
    Senior Member Lightyear's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    903

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Haphazard View Post
    What about in the West of Germany?
    There are very industrialised areas in West Germany (I am especially thinking of the Ruhrgebiet Ruhr - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia) where there are many people that might be considered working class because traditionally a lot of manual labour was needed there. But still I don't think the concept of class per se exists in Germany as it does in England. We might have a handful of very rich people in Germany and some poorer people but everything in the middle is kind of the same. For example the idea that you go to a certain school or university because you are middle or upper class doesn't register in Germany, there are a handful of schools for the very rich but that is something that is completely outside of the norm. (That has of course also to do with the fact that university education is still free in a lot of places in Germany.)

  5. #25
    Don't Judge Me! Haphazard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    MBTI
    ENFJ
    Posts
    6,707

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lightyear View Post
    There are very industrialised areas in West Germany (I am especially thinking of the Ruhrgebiet Ruhr - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia) where there are many people that might be considered working class because traditionally a lot of manual labour was needed there. But still I don't think the concept of class per se exists in Germany as it does in England. We might have a handful of very rich people in Germany and some poorer people but everything in the middle is kind of the same. For example the idea that you go to a certain school or university because you are middle or upper class doesn't register in Germany, there are a handful of schools for the very rich but that is something that is completely outside of the norm.
    Are you sure this is not more an example of the educational system than an example of a lack of a class system?

    Of course if it's "free" it's going to be different. In New York City, no matter where you live there, if you get into a magnet school, you can go there. That doesn't change the fact that there are still social classes in New York City.
    -Carefully taking sips from the Fire Hose of Knowledge

  6. #26
    Order Now! pure_mercury's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    MBTI
    ESFJ
    Posts
    6,946

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lightyear View Post
    Not where I come from in the East of Germany. Even though my Dad works in a power station I would never think of myself as working class since I have never been brought up with these terms, they are meaningless to me. Also for example in England class doesn't necessarily depend on your job but on what the social standing of the family is that you were born into.
    And people in the United States who make $150,000 a year consider themselves middle-class. You are writing as if there are hard and fast classes in the United States, which is untrue except at the very top and bottom. And do they not have the Gymnasium/Realschule/Hauptschule system in Eastern Germany?

    The German school system


    The funniest thing is when German friends visit me in England I have to explain to them the concept of class ("Even though this woman isn't dressed like a working class woman once you hear her speak her accent will reveal what class she belongs to." etc), to them the concept is just as meaningless as to me and they are surprised that this categorisation still exists.
    Class in the social context is still a big deal in England. In the United States, it's really more just how money you make/spend.
    Who wants to try a bottle of merc's "Extroversion Olive Oil?"

  7. #27
    Senior Member Lightyear's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    903

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Haphazard View Post
    Are you sure this is not more an example of the educational system than an example of a lack of a class system?

    Trust me, we don't have a class system (I am especially thinking of the English definition of class here when making this statement.), we just don't think in these terms, it's an alien concept to us. There has been a widening of the gap between rich and poor recently because since the reunification in 1989 there has been big unemployment especially in East Germany but you won't find someone walking around labeling people as upper class or middle class, whoever you address with these labels would just stare at you blankly.

  8. #28
    Don't Judge Me! Haphazard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    MBTI
    ENFJ
    Posts
    6,707

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lightyear View Post
    Trust me, we don't have a class system (I am especially thinking of the English definition of class here when making this statement.), we just don't think in these terms, it's an alien concept to us. There has been a widening of the gap between rich and poor recently because since the reunification in 1989 there has been big unemployment especially in East Germany but you won't find someone walking around labeling people as upper class or middle class, whoever you address with these labels would just stare at you blankly.
    I don't think anybody has a class system in the way of the English except the English. They're pretty unique in that regard. Please do not confuse all English-speakers for Englishmen. The British had a pretty big empire, you know.
    -Carefully taking sips from the Fire Hose of Knowledge

  9. #29
    Senior Member Lightyear's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    903

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by pure_mercury View Post

    Class in the social context is still a big deal in England. In the United States, it's really more just how money you make/spend.
    In Germany university education is still free in a lot of places plus the state will give you money to cover your living costs when you are a student and you only have to pay back half of it, so money doesn't really make such a difference to where you study, the whole system just isn't geared like this.

    Also the whole general attitude is different to the States, it's not about being the best or working the hardest, it's about everyone having what they need and a little bit more and the social security system reflects that. People in general will always have enough to live because the government will support them financially. It's just a very different mindset.

    So maybe the big "class-difference" is that money doesn't define you as much as it does in the States.

    EDIT: And yes we do have the Gymnasium/Realschule/Hauptschule system in East Germany but as someone who has attended a Gymnasium you wouldn't consider someone with a certificate from a Haupschule as someone from a different class, he just simply as a lower level of education as you do.

  10. #30
    Senior Member Lightyear's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    903

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Haphazard View Post
    I don't think anybody has a class system in the way of the English except the English. They're pretty unique in that regard. Please do not confuse all English-speakers for Englishmen. The British had a pretty big empire, you know.
    Yes, I guess it all depends on the definitions. The concept of class in England is different to the concept of class in the States. As I said in Germany neither what social class you are born into nor how much money your parents make really makes such a big difference, so each of these two definitions of class doesn't mean much to a German.

Similar Threads

  1. Income group/social class and TV or Internet use
    By Survive & Stay Free in forum Politics, History, and Current Events
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 08-10-2012, 10:15 PM
  2. social class and type
    By UniqueMixture in forum Myers-Briggs and Jungian Cognitive Functions
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 05-26-2012, 07:15 PM
  3. Suicide and social power
    By labyrinthine in forum General Psychology
    Replies: 30
    Last Post: 09-04-2007, 03:04 AM
  4. Relational Competition and "Social" Bullying
    By Maverick in forum General Psychology
    Replies: 58
    Last Post: 05-24-2007, 08:24 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO