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  1. #101
    Senior Member Lateralus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peguy View Post
    I believe China identifies itself as a Third World country, not sure about India. Nevertheless if we go by the original definition of "Third World", they both fall into that category.
    Definitions change. If you go by the original definition, the US could never become a third world country because it was the first world, by definition (the US and its allies). China is considered second world by the "original" definition (it was allied with the USSR).

    Today, people use it more often as an economic description than a geopolitical description, since the USSR collapsed.
    "We grow up thinking that beliefs are something to be proud of, but they're really nothing but opinions one refuses to reconsider. Beliefs are easy. The stronger your beliefs are, the less open you are to growth and wisdom, because "strength of belief" is only the intensity with which you resist questioning yourself. As soon as you are proud of a belief, as soon as you think it adds something to who you are, then you've made it a part of your ego."

  2. #102
    Dreaming the life onemoretime's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lateralus View Post
    I never said everyone could be. The fact that people with these skills exist in such great numbers in the US is one of the reasons it won't deteriorate into a third world country. They satisfy a basic need of a modern society.

    Every society has unskilled labor.
    What exactly will these people do, if the demand for their labor is satisfied? This is not a supply-side issue, hardly anything outside of a supply shock is.

  3. #103
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lateralus View Post
    Definitions change. If you go by the original definition, the US could never become a first world country because it was the first world, by definition (the US and its allies). China is considered second world by the "original" definition (it was allied with the USSR).

    Today, people use it more often as an economic description than a geopolitical description, since the USSR collapsed.
    China was never really considered part of the Second world, and certainly not after it's split with the Soviets in the 60's. From then on, China tried to assert itself as the leader of the Third World, contrary to both the West and the Soviet bloc.

  4. #104
    Senior Member Lateralus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peguy View Post
    China was never really considered part of the Second world, and certainly not after it's split with the Soviets in the 60's. From then on, China tried to assert itself as the leader of the Third World, contrary to both the West and the Soviet bloc.
    At the time, they were.
    "We grow up thinking that beliefs are something to be proud of, but they're really nothing but opinions one refuses to reconsider. Beliefs are easy. The stronger your beliefs are, the less open you are to growth and wisdom, because "strength of belief" is only the intensity with which you resist questioning yourself. As soon as you are proud of a belief, as soon as you think it adds something to who you are, then you've made it a part of your ego."

  5. #105
    Senior Member Lateralus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by onemoretime View Post
    What exactly will these people do, if the demand for their labor is satisfied? This is not a supply-side issue, hardly anything outside of a supply shock is.
    You're not making any sense.
    "We grow up thinking that beliefs are something to be proud of, but they're really nothing but opinions one refuses to reconsider. Beliefs are easy. The stronger your beliefs are, the less open you are to growth and wisdom, because "strength of belief" is only the intensity with which you resist questioning yourself. As soon as you are proud of a belief, as soon as you think it adds something to who you are, then you've made it a part of your ego."

  6. #106
    Dreaming the life onemoretime's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lateralus View Post
    You're not making any sense.
    Not difficult. Jobs that demand high education levels are few and far between, because of the near-infinite reproducibility of information. Consequently, the market for those jobs will be saturated quickly.

    What will everyone else do?

  7. #107
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lateralus View Post
    At the time, they were.
    Up until the 1960's, after which relations deteriorated. There were actual border clashes between Soviet and Chinese forces in 1969.
    Sino-Soviet border conflict - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    The Soviet even inquired to the Americans of their possible reaction to military strikes on China's nuclear facilities.

  8. #108
    Senior Member Lateralus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peguy View Post
    Up until the 1960's, after which relations deteriorated. There were actual border clashes between Soviet and Chinese forces in 1969.
    Sino-Soviet border conflict - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Still doesn't change the fact that they were considered part of the second world.
    "We grow up thinking that beliefs are something to be proud of, but they're really nothing but opinions one refuses to reconsider. Beliefs are easy. The stronger your beliefs are, the less open you are to growth and wisdom, because "strength of belief" is only the intensity with which you resist questioning yourself. As soon as you are proud of a belief, as soon as you think it adds something to who you are, then you've made it a part of your ego."

  9. #109
    Senior Member Lateralus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by onemoretime View Post
    Not difficult. Jobs that demand high education levels are few and far between, because of the near-infinite reproducibility of information. Consequently, the market for those jobs will be saturated quickly.

    What will everyone else do?
    Even if I agree with you (and I don't), I still fail to see what this has to do with my argument. So far, I see my interaction with you in this thread as a waste of time. You get one more chance.
    "We grow up thinking that beliefs are something to be proud of, but they're really nothing but opinions one refuses to reconsider. Beliefs are easy. The stronger your beliefs are, the less open you are to growth and wisdom, because "strength of belief" is only the intensity with which you resist questioning yourself. As soon as you are proud of a belief, as soon as you think it adds something to who you are, then you've made it a part of your ego."

  10. #110
    Dreaming the life onemoretime's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lateralus View Post
    Even if I agree with you (and I don't), I still fail to see what this has to do with my argument. So far, I see my interaction with you in this thread as a waste of time. You get one more chance.
    So far, you've missed the point every time. Get off your high horse.

    People can't work if they are not needed for any jobs. Period. Employment isn't based on magic, it's based on demand for labor. If the United States can satisfy its consumptive demand without full employment, that is what it will do, ceteris paribus.

    That less than full employment means the beginning of a deflationary spiral doesn't mean this isn't still true, it just means that outside intervention, human suffering increases.

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