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  1. #111
    Gotta catch you all! Blackmail!'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by spamtar View Post
    The invasion has been 'good' for both herion producers and distributers. After the Trans-Afghanistan Pipeline druglords are probably one of the bigest beneficiaries of this war. Suspect a lot of solders will get hooked in the process thereby creating a larger American market for smack too.

    "US military presence has served to restore rather than eradicate the drug trade.

    What the reports fail to acknowledge is that the Taliban government was instrumental in implementing a successful drug eradication program, with the support and collaboration of the UN.

    Implemented in 2000-2001, the Taliban's drug eradication program led to a 94 percent decline in opium cultivation. In 2001, according to UN figures, opium production had fallen to 185 tons. Immediately following the October 2001 US led invasion, production increased dramatically, regaining its historical levels
    ."
    Yes.

    But what you have forgotten to mention is that it's also the Talibans themselves that reintroduced opium cultivation because they needed immediate cash to finance their war.

    And it's them who introduced opium culture first from Pakistan in 1989, at least to an industrial scale.


    But nowadays, 93% of the world heroin is manufactured in Afghanistan (88% of it in areas controlled by the Talibans and their allies). And 60% of this production goes through Iran and later to Europe (Ahmadinejad's regime is always glad to contribute to the Western world's decadence), and the rest through the Pakistani tribal zone.
    "A man who only drinks water has a secret to hide from his fellow-men" -Baudelaire

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  2. #112
    psicobolche tcda's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=Blackmail!;1003502]
    And the worst is, that when was 17 or so, I did read all this crap. :rolli:
    Not another ex-leftist...shouldn't you be running a blog?

    Did you only read it or did you also practice it?

    Did you know that Sartre was my Godfather?

    I mean, literally.
    There's no way I could have known this. I would be envious of you, but luckily I don't do personal envy, only class hatred as an ideology. Besides the intelligentsia is a necessarry eventual ally (provided they overcome their tendency to obscurantism, as many do under the pressures of class struggle).

    Anyway, if you want to learn something about the real Afghanistan, may be you could start with books of testimonies about that dear Massoud, for instance the ones written by De Ponfilly or Rolin.
    Thanks for the suggestion, I would be interested.

    I recommend to you in turn, my friend, The Liberal Defense of Murder by Richard Seymour...not specifically about the history of Afghanistan but explains the contradictions of the anti-resistance liberals very nicely.
    "Of course we spent our money in the good times. That's what you're supposed to do in good times! You can't save money in the good times. Then they wouldn't be good times, they'd be 'preparation for the bad times' times."

    "Every country in the world owes money. Everyone. So heere's what I dont get: who do they all owe it to, and why don't we just kill the bastard and relax?"

    -Tommy Tiernan, Irish comedian.

  3. #113
    Sniffles
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blackmail! View Post
    You like conspiracy theories, don't you?

    And especially those including rich Jews, I presume?
    Didn't two Frenchmen write a book about there being a conspiracy to attack Afghanistan, Forbidden Truth?

  4. #114
    Senior Member matmos's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by spamtar View Post
    "Implemented in 2000-2001, the Taliban's drug eradication program led to a 94 percent decline in opium cultivation. In 2001, according to UN figures, opium production had fallen to 185 tons. Immediately following the October 2001 US led invasion, production increased dramatically, regaining its historical levels[/I]."
    If you want to keep prices high, choke supply. We know that a vast amount of heroin was put in storage. The barometer - the street price of a hit.

    The relationship between the invasion and opium production just might be coincidental.

  5. #115
    Senior Member lowtech redneck's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tcda View Post
    But yet the current regime tried to pass a law legalizing rape in marraige and forbidding women to go out the house without their husbands permission, which even its supprotersin the west were forced to admit was more misogynistic than any law the Taliban ever decreed.

    Pressure on Hamid Karzai to scrap Afghan women's law | World news | The Guardian
    I'm already well aware of that proposed law (most aspects of which were removed after Western pressure); the Taliban forbade female education with or without the approval of a male "guardian," making them inherently more misogynistic than the current regime....a point that should be more than a little obvious.

    The question remains, does your posturing (on this and other issues within this thread) reflect deliberate obfuscation for propaganda purposes in pursuit of a desired end, or are you so emotionally invested in a radical left-wing worldview that you simply cannot see see the fallacy in what you present as truth?

  6. #116
    THREADKILLER Prototype's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by spamtar View Post
    Nope. Not Isreal. Its not nations although Russia and China are proably currently laughing it up.

    Nations for the most part are an oldway of looking at things. Israel (at least as we know it modernly) is gonna collapse by the end of this decade. Hopefully in a mostly bloodless manner as South Africa (but I doubt it).
    Do you honestly think the US, or Britain will let that happen to their investment?
    ... They say that knowledge is free, and to truly acquire wisdom always comes with a price... Well then,... That will be $10, please!

  7. #117
    Gotta catch you all! Blackmail!'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prototype View Post
    Do you honestly think the US, or Britain will let that happen to their investment?
    Frankly: Are you just playing us a bad joke, or are you deliberately trying to flirt with anti-Semitism?
    "A man who only drinks water has a secret to hide from his fellow-men" -Baudelaire

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  8. #118
    Don't Judge Me! Haphazard's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prototype View Post
    Do you honestly think the US, or Britain will let that happen to their investment?
    Do you honestly think that even if it does collapse that Jews won't keep coming back?
    -Carefully taking sips from the Fire Hose of Knowledge

  9. #119
    psicobolche tcda's Avatar
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    I'm already well aware of that proposed law (most aspects of which were removed after Western pressure); the Taliban forbade female education with or without the approval of a male "guardian," making them inherently more misogynistic than the current regime....a point that should be more than a little obvious.
    Really? Do you really think life has got better for women in Afghanistan since the occupation, or that as a result of this occupation/dictatorship it can do?



    LENIN'S TOMB: Malalai Joya on the Farah bombings

    Malalai Joya was the youngest member of the Afghan Parliament, elected in 2005 to represent Farah Province. In May 2007 she was unjustly suspended from Parliament. Her memoir, Raising My Voice: The Extraordinary Story of an Afghan Who Dared to Raise Her Voice, is forthcoming later this year from Rider.

    By Malalai Joya

    As an elected representative for Farah, Afghanistan, I add my voice to those condemning the NATO bombing that claimed over 150 civilian lives in my province earlier this month. This latest massacre offers the world a glimpse of the horrors faced by our people.

    However, as I explained at a May 11 press conference in Kabul, the U.S. military authorities do not want you to see this reality. As usual, they have tried to downplay the number of civilian casualties, but I have information that as many as 164 civilians were killed in the bombings. One grief stricken man from the village of Geranai explained at the press conference that he had lost 20 members of his family in the massacre.

    The Afghan government commission, furthermore, appears to have failed to list infants under the age of three who were killed. The government commission that went to the village after three days -- when all the victims had been buried in mass graves by the villagers -- is not willing to make their list public. How can the precious lives of Afghans be treated with such disrespect?

    The news last week is that the U.S. has replaced their top military commander in Afghanistan, but I think this is just a trick to deceive our people and put off responsibility for their disastrous overall strategy in Afghanistan on the shoulders of one person.

    The Afghan ambassador in the U.S. said in an interview with Al Jazeera that if a ‘proper apology’ is made, then ‘people will understand’ the civilian deaths. But the Afghan people do not just want to hear ‘sorry.’ We ask for an end to the occupation of Afghanistan and a stop to such tragic war crimes.

    The demonstrations by students and others against these latest air strikes, like last month’s protest by hundreds of Afghan women in Kabul, show the world the way forward for real democracy in Afghanistan. In the face of harassment and threats, women took to the streets to demand the scrapping of the law that would legalize rape within marriage and codify the oppression of our country’s Shia women. Just as the U.S. air strikes have not brought security to Afghans, nor has the occupation brought security to Afghan women. The reality is quite the opposite.

    This now infamous law is but the tip of the iceberg of the women’s rights catastrophe in our occupied country. The whole system, and especially the judiciary, is infected with the virus of fundamentalism and so, in Afghanistan, men who commit crimes against women do so with impunity. Rates of abduction, gang rape, and domestic violence are as high as ever, and so is the number of women’s self-immolations and other forms of suicide. Tragically, women would rather set themselves on fire than endure the hell of life in our ‘liberated’ country.

    The Afghan Constitution does include provisions for women’s rights – I was one of many female delegates to the 2003 Loya Jirga who pushed hard to include them. But this founding document of the ‘new Afghanistan’ was also scarred by the heavy influence of fundamentalists and warlords, with whom Karzai and the West have been compromising from the beginning.

    In fact, I was not really surprised by this latest law against women. When the U.S. and its allies replaced the Taliban with the old notorious warlords and fundamentalists of the Northern Alliance, I could see that the only change we would see was from the frying pan to the fire.

    There have been a whole series of outrageous laws and court decisions in recent years. For instance, there was the disgusting law passed on the pretext of ‘national reconciliation’ that provided immunity from prosecution to warlords and notorious war criminals, many of whom sit in the Afghan Parliament. At that time, the world media and governments turned a blind eye to it.

    My opposition to this law was one of the reasons that I, as an elected MP from Farah Province, was expelled from Parliament in May 2007. More recently, there was the outrageous 20-year sentence handed down against Parvez Kambakhsh, a young man whose only crime was to allegedly distribute a dissenting article at his university.

    We are told that additional U.S. and NATO troops are coming to Afghanistan to help secure the upcoming presidential election. But frankly the Afghan people have no hope in this election – we know that there can be no true democracy under the guns of warlords, the drug trafficking mafia and occupation.

    With the exception of Ramazan Bashardost, most of the other candidates are the known, discredited faces that have been part and parcel of the mafia-like, failed government of Hamid Karzai. We know that one puppet can be replaced by another puppet, and that the winner of this election will most certainly be selected behind closed doors in the White House and the Pentagon. I must conclude that this presidential election is merely a drama to legitimize the future U.S. puppet.

    Just like in Iraq, war has not brought liberation to Afghanistan. Neither war was really about democracy or justice or uprooting terrorist groups; rather they were and are about U.S. strategic interests in the region. We Afghans have never liked being pawns in the ‘Great Game’ of empire, as the British and the Soviets learned in the past century.

    It is a shame that so much of Afghanistan’s reality has been kept veiled by a western media consensus in support of the ‘good war.’ Perhaps if the citizens of North America had been better informed about my country, President Obama would not have dared to send more troops and spend taxpayers’ money on a war that is only adding to the suffering of our people and pushing the region into deeper conflicts.

    A troop ‘surge’ in Afghanistan, and continued air strikes, will do nothing to help the liberation of Afghan women. The only thing it will do is increase the number of civilian casualties and increase the resistance to occupation.

    To really help Afghan women, citizens in the U.S. and elsewhere must tell their government to stop propping up and covering for a regime of warlords and extremists. If these thugs were finally brought to justice, Afghan women and men would prove quite capable of helping ourselves.
    Quote Originally Posted by lowtech redneck View Post
    The question remains, does your posturing (on this and other issues within this thread) reflect deliberate obfuscation for propaganda purposes in pursuit of a desired end, or are you so emotionally invested in a radical left-wing worldview that you simply cannot see see the fallacy in what you present as truth?
    Maybe you need to ask yourself a similair question (just replace "radical left-wing" with "conservative").
    "Of course we spent our money in the good times. That's what you're supposed to do in good times! You can't save money in the good times. Then they wouldn't be good times, they'd be 'preparation for the bad times' times."

    "Every country in the world owes money. Everyone. So heere's what I dont get: who do they all owe it to, and why don't we just kill the bastard and relax?"

    -Tommy Tiernan, Irish comedian.

  10. #120
    psicobolche tcda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blackmail! View Post
    Frankly: Are you just playing us a bad joke, or are you deliberatly trying to flirt with anti-Semitism?
    How was his comment in any way anti-semitic?
    "Of course we spent our money in the good times. That's what you're supposed to do in good times! You can't save money in the good times. Then they wouldn't be good times, they'd be 'preparation for the bad times' times."

    "Every country in the world owes money. Everyone. So heere's what I dont get: who do they all owe it to, and why don't we just kill the bastard and relax?"

    -Tommy Tiernan, Irish comedian.

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