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  1. #1
    Senior Member Survive & Stay Free's Avatar
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    Default TV, secondary socialisation and life as we know it

    This will be a difficult topic to set up considering how great a difference there is between the UK, mainland Europe and US in TV programming but bear with me and help me out if you can make better sense of it.

    I recall growing up and there were very clear age group orientated, boundaried almost, TV programming on a limited number of channels. Its not just that there were times of the day when the two main channels dedicated their broadcasting to childrens TV, with a friendly, almost paternal or maternal broadcaster who as the "face" of the broadcasting service, with the programming starting with cartoons and progressing to a "teen drama" which dealt with such pressing problems as the first kiss and making and breaking friendships. Then there was the childrens news broadcasting then the TV gave over to adult broadcasting again with the adult news broadcasts.

    This sort of broadcasting has changed, the structuration is gone, although the rise of other networks and complete channels devoted to particular sorts of viewing has had a role to play. The content is there still but not the structure.

    Then there is the amount of programming which deals with the topic of living, often thinly veiled as SciFi or Fantasy (both star trekk and Buffy the Vampire slayer often featured characters who where confused by humanity and trying to become human, conducting a close study of humanity). I think there's less of that sort of broadcasting now although there are repeats shown on some networks in the UK.

    My question is whether TV has become a powerful form of secondary socialisation? Its become so ubiquitous that families without TVs are considered unusual, even families without a TV constantly playing in one room often in a number of rooms simultaneously are considered unusual. This being the case what about its impact? Both the content and structure of broadcasting could have a massive implication for society and the individual per se in terms of development and welfare.

  2. #2
    movin melodies kiddykat's Avatar
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    Over here in the U.S., T.V. has tremendous impact on the culture. I'd say it's one of the primary socialization factors (other than family). I think that a majority of children who don't have their parents around often emulate what they see on T.V. as their primary source for values/learning. Even if they do have supervision at home, television is a primary source for propaganda. I'd question the owners of mass media, who control/slant materials presented for audiences to see.

    Instead of the "we" factor, I've noticed especially with the popularity of so-called "Reality" TV shows/idolization of celebrities, that there is a major shift leaning towards a "me, me, me" type of ideology, which very much resembles Freud's theory on the id that's extremely impulse driven, and has strong emphasis on instant gratification/lack of insight.

  3. #3
    Don't Judge Me! Haphazard's Avatar
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    I don't know. If you have cable in the US, you can get plenty of TV that really doesn't have much of a socialization factor at all. Animal Planet is on all the time at my house. I guess it helps socialize you if you want to socialize with dogs, maybe.
    -Carefully taking sips from the Fire Hose of Knowledge

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lark View Post
    This will be a difficult topic to set up considering how great a difference there is between the UK, mainland Europe and US in TV programming but bear with me and help me out if you can make better sense of it.

    I recall growing up and there were very clear age group orientated, boundaried almost, TV programming on a limited number of channels. Its not just that there were times of the day when the two main channels dedicated their broadcasting to childrens TV, with a friendly, almost paternal or maternal broadcaster who as the "face" of the broadcasting service, with the programming starting with cartoons and progressing to a "teen drama" which dealt with such pressing problems as the first kiss and making and breaking friendships. Then there was the childrens news broadcasting then the TV gave over to adult broadcasting again with the adult news broadcasts.

    This sort of broadcasting has changed, the structuration is gone, although the rise of other networks and complete channels devoted to particular sorts of viewing has had a role to play. The content is there still but not the structure.

    Then there is the amount of programming which deals with the topic of living, often thinly veiled as SciFi or Fantasy (both star trekk and Buffy the Vampire slayer often featured characters who where confused by humanity and trying to become human, conducting a close study of humanity). I think there's less of that sort of broadcasting now although there are repeats shown on some networks in the UK.

    My question is whether TV has become a powerful form of secondary socialisation? Its become so ubiquitous that families without TVs are considered unusual, even families without a TV constantly playing in one room often in a number of rooms simultaneously are considered unusual. This being the case what about its impact? Both the content and structure of broadcasting could have a massive implication for society and the individual per se in terms of development and welfare.
    The key word here is "programming". Considering the popularity of TV the impact it makes is an important question since the nature of watching TV is conducive to absorbing information in a way that plays down rational, critical thinking. I avoid watching it because now I find it mainly to be a tool brainwashing people to consume things and live a certain way. It is odd to observe someone watching TV or staring at a computer screen. Both things take away from real human interaction and personal study and give the user information from a secondary source... as it was already filtered.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nyx View Post
    The key word here is "programming". Considering the popularity of TV the impact it makes is an important question since the nature of watching TV is conducive to absorbing information in a way that plays down rational, critical thinking. I avoid watching it because now I find it mainly to be a tool brainwashing people to consume things and live a certain way. It is odd to observe someone watching TV or staring at a computer screen. Both things take away from real human interaction and personal study and give the user information from a secondary source... as it was already filtered.
    I agree.

    The nature of modern entertainment promotes a "build up" of information in which the viewer is not encouraged to question content. Televised News should be regarded as entertainment as well, which has been one of the greatest downfalls of the "Era of Information". Furthermore, advertisements are not forthcoming about the products they display; creating a confusion between human desire and human need.

    Modern socialization has been muddled with social networking, texting, and other technological progressions. This is an unfortunate side-effect of the increase in human population being dispersed across a wide array of geographical climates. I estimate that 50 years from now we'll be celebrating Christmas with family via technology because our lives will be too fast paced and distributed for legitimate social interaction.

    EDIT: Just to deviate, when I saw the title of this thread, I was expecting "socialization" to be a reference to socialism. On that note, I think that Television distributes information in a quasi-socialized format.

    Childrens' programming certainly establishes an unrealistic president for children before they enter the real world. Perhaps this is where adulthood steps in and distinguishes fanciful expectations from realistic expectations. Albeit, there seems to be a rise in the population of "childish adults" (In terms of behavior, not necessarily interests).

  6. #6
    Don't Judge Me! Haphazard's Avatar
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    I think television's impact has gone down with the rise of the internet.

    The internet is an extremely appealing medium. It has tons of free content created by people who have way too much free time on their hands, and because it's worldwide you can always find someone online to talk to. Also, there's the anonymity, which allows for so many things that you cannot do in real life.

    TV I can't really think of as "social". It's just there, you watch it, and then you have something to talk about with your friends the next day. Online, however, there is (limited) interaction and despite a few small corners, it is largely unregulated. It seems like it would be a much more important factor to me.

    However, this is coming from someone who can barely stand to sit through TV programs, so I may be biased.
    -Carefully taking sips from the Fire Hose of Knowledge

  7. #7
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    Don't forget about programs like Skype, that make online interactions even more personal.
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    Te = 16[][][][][][][][][][][][][][][][]
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    Fi = 15 [][][][][][][][][][][][][][][]
    Si = 12 [][][][][][][][][][][][]
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    -----------------
    Tiger got to hunt, bird got to fly;
    Man got to sit and wonder why, why, why;
    Tiger got to sleep, bird got to land;
    Man got to tell himself he understand

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