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  1. #11
    & Badger, Ratty and Toad Mole's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Haphazard View Post
    Or, well, if you're talking about "high" culture, Americans have that too. They're just very good at hiding it.
    It's true, America does have an excellent high culture. The only problem is that it is not profitable to export it to the rest of the world. However it is very profitable to export your popular culture.

    So no wonder we judge you by your popular culture.

    But what is terrifying is that a billion muslims also judge America by its popular culture - and they find it repulsive, immoral and against the Word of Allah.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by avolkiteshvara View Post
    I met an exchange student from France who was studying American culture.


    My first thought was " we have culture"?
    Actually we do, it's just not well known.

  3. #13
    Une Femme est une femme paperoceans's Avatar
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    Wow.
    Between that cigarillo and sticking my finger down my throat to see if I could DT, I feel like puking RN.

    Read my Blog.

  4. #14
    Iron Maiden fidelia's Avatar
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    I think that not knowing those things is not a reason to look down on someone, but it is probably an indicator of how much exposure they've had to other information and ideas outside of their immediate surroundings. This can affect their mindset or how they relate to other people depending on the reason for the lack of exposure.

    Reasons for not having this knowledge are varied and numerous: age, economic situation, values of those around them, school curriculum and emphasis, personality, social class, presence of books in their childhood surroundings, personal interest, reading ability and others. Because the reasons are so varied, I don't think a person should be treated disrespectfully for not knowing. However, my perception of the person would be altered depending on WHY they didn't have that knowledge (choice as opposed to lack of opportunity).

    Just as references to movies have become a kind of shorthand for certain ideas or feelings, literature has used a certain body of information as shorthand for different ideas and feelings for hundred of years. This has seeped into our everyday speech as well, whether or not people recognize the origins. To not have access to this shorthand means that the person will not get a lot of the context for information out of books and speech and this is a loss to the person. It also restricts the way that the speaker can express themselves to that person.

    I recently came across Grade 8 exams from my grandparents' prairie schools (most of them were first or second generation prairie people in one room school houses). I was astounded at the breadth of subject matter they were expected to know, despite their practical needs (knowledge of art history, music, advanced math, memorized poetry, literature, grammar, writing mechanics etc). Most high school graduates now would not have even been exposed to that kind of content, let alone be able to pass similar exams on it. I think some of this stemmed out of a different philosophy of what kinds of skills were important to be learning.

  5. #15
    Senior Member millerm277's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Haphazard View Post
    American culture mostly involves cars and driving them across wide, open spaces. The first thing an American tells a tourist that the only way to really "see" America is to get a car and drive it from New York to LA (or possibly San Francisco). Apparently, the only way to "see" America is to experience hours and hours of mountains, then of corn, and then of wheat, and then more mountains, to eat a half-cold microwave burrito from a gas station that sells T-shirts also, to take a shower in a truck stop, to use the toilet in at least one dubious rest stop, drive across well-beaten and yet still terrifying terrain, and then to finally reach the oasis on the other side.
    My take: The culture of america, is that of the "frontier" and embracing it. There's a vast area of nearly unpopulated land, crossed only by a couple interstates spaces a couple hundred miles apart, and what do we all want to do, at least supposedly? Go to Yellowstone, or the like, and go camping. Why? Because that's what we value "culturally" more so than museums and art; the outdoors and the "frontier", the unspoiled lands in our country. (Just my opinion of course).

    Or, well, if you're talking about "high" culture, Americans have that too. They're just very good at hiding it.
    There are a great number of great American artists and authors, just America as a society values it less in my opinion.
    I-95%, S-84%, T-89%, P-84%

  6. #16
    Senior Member Ruthie's Avatar
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    What's so bad about low-culture?

    Seriously, when did worldliness become The Most Coveted Value?

  7. #17
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    i always wondered why being "cultured" means things like French art, Renaissance art, etc...

    what about Navajo, Peruvian, or some long lost tribal art in the Amazon? In the end, isn't "cultural" art just about the status of that civilization? What really makes following one " chic culture" better than following some " long lost culture"?

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ruthie View Post
    What's so bad about low-culture?
    It's low.

  9. #19
    Senior Member Hirsch63's Avatar
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    Culture is commodity. Culture is the accessorizing of Class and can only be appreciated when it is on deliberate display. The job of culture may be to perpetuate culture...after all their is money to be made there.

    What do we produce with our culture, high or low? A perfectly maniacal ass can possess all the accoutrements of culture and be of no material use to anyone else. Another more thoughtful person with no pretensions or preconceptions can be invaluable in their sphere. My studies often take me into the realm of "Folk" art where sometimes strange, sentimental an powerful cultural pressures produce produce unique diamonds. It is untutored and unconcious yet with interpretation we have a window into a rather personal world view.
    Patriotism is the last refuge to which a scoundrel clings...Steal a little and they throw you in jail, steal a lot and they make you a king

  10. #20
    morose bourgeoisie
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    So-called 'high culture' is available to everyone. It's cheap too. You can buy Beethoven's 9 symphonies for under $17 on Amazon.




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