User Tag List

12 Last

Results 1 to 10 of 12

  1. #1
    lab rat extraordinaire CrystalViolet's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    MBTI
    XNFP
    Enneagram
    5w4 sx/sp
    Posts
    2,170

    Default So much for saying "Sorry"

    Boy to fight 'stolen Freddo' charges

    I just thought I'd share this with you all.


    A 12-year-old boy will fight charges that he received a chocolate Freddo frog allegedly stolen from a supermarket in regional Western Australia.

    A lawyer for the boy, who appeared in Northam Children's Court on Monday, said he would plead not guilty to the two charges of receiving, which carry similar penalties to those of theft.

    The boy is alleged to have received the chocolate from a friend who had stolen it from a supermarket and to have received a novelty sign stolen from another store.

    The combined value of the frog and the sign is no more than several dollars.

    Police said outside the court that the boy's arrest and charging was justified and that he had previously come to their notice without being charged.

    Acting Superintendent Peter Halliday, of Northam police, said charges against juveniles as young as 12 were only laid as a last resort.

    "It's not about the value, it's about stopping children from offending," Supt Halliday told reporters.

    He denied there were any racial overtones to the matter and said police employed a number of methods to try to keep juveniles out of the court, including cautions and the use of juvenile justice teams.

    "When they don't work it's entirely appropriate that we escalate matters to the children's court," he said.

    He said it was a matter of "needing to do the right thing not only by the community but also by the child involved".

    WA Aboriginal Legal Service chief lawyer Peter Collins, who is acting for the boy, would not comment on the matter outside court.

    He had earlier described the prosecution as "scandalous" and said the situation was unlikely to have arisen if the boy had come from a "middle class, non-Aboriginal family" in Perth.

    Mr Collins told Fairfax Radio network and the ABC on Monday that the boy had missed a court appearance last month because of a family misunderstanding.

    He said when arrested, he had been apprehended at school and imprisoned for several hours in a holding cell at the local police station.

    "The conditions in those cells are appalling and completely ill-equipped to hold young children," he said.

    "The fact of the matter is he's 12, and these are the most trivial charges imaginable, and it can hardly be a justification for this kid to be brushed up against the courts to teach him a bit of a lesson.

    "It's not hard to imagine that if this had happened to a non-Aboriginal kid from an affluent Perth suburb with professional parents that this wouldn't be the situation."

    The boy was bailed to appear in court again on February 22 for the setting of a trial date.

    WA Premier Colin Barnett said any questions to government on the matter should be referred to Attorney-General Christian Porter, but said he suspected "there is more to the case" than had so far been reported.

    "I suspect there's more to it than a Freddo frog," Mr Barnett told reporters.
    Currently submerged under an avalanche of books and paper work. I may come back up for air from time to time.
    Real life awaits and she is a demanding mistress.

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

  2. #2
    lab rat extraordinaire CrystalViolet's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    MBTI
    XNFP
    Enneagram
    5w4 sx/sp
    Posts
    2,170

    Default

    I should explain in 2008, the Australian PM Kevin Rudd said Sorry to the aborignals of Australian. It was mostly in relation to the "stolen generations"of aboriginal children and the explotation that occur during Coloniel times. How ever treatment of the aboriginal people still has much to be desired. The above is a prime example of that treatment.
    Currently submerged under an avalanche of books and paper work. I may come back up for air from time to time.
    Real life awaits and she is a demanding mistress.

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

  3. #3
    Nips away your dignity Fluffywolf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    MBTI
    INTP
    Enneagram
    9 sp/sx
    Posts
    9,422

    Default

    I've been arrested and imprisoned for a few hours when I was 12 too, pretty much an identical story. But I am no aboriginal child. Does this mean that treatment towards caucasian people also has much left to be desired?
    ~Self-depricating Megalomaniacal Superwolf

  4. #4
    Senior Member Shimmy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    MBTI
    SEXY
    Posts
    1,868

    Default

    Doesn't the treatment towards people in general has much left to be desired?
    (removed)

  5. #5
    lab rat extraordinaire CrystalViolet's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    MBTI
    XNFP
    Enneagram
    5w4 sx/sp
    Posts
    2,170

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Fluffywolf View Post
    I've been arrested and imprisoned for a few hours when I was 12 too, pretty much an identical story. But I am no aboriginal child. Does this mean that treatment towards caucasian people also has much left to be desired?
    Well, don't you think that was an extreme punishment? If I were your parents (disregarding the race issue for a moment) I'd certainly be damned upset that you could have been exposed to serious criminal elements and the seedier side of life. For stealing chocolate. I would be suing the pants off the police.

    Quote Originally Posted by Shimmy View Post
    Doesn't the treatment towards people in general has much left to be desired?
    That makes it alright then?
    Currently submerged under an avalanche of books and paper work. I may come back up for air from time to time.
    Real life awaits and she is a demanding mistress.

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

  6. #6
    Nips away your dignity Fluffywolf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    MBTI
    INTP
    Enneagram
    9 sp/sx
    Posts
    9,422

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by FireyPheonix View Post
    Well, don't you think that was an extreme punishment? If I were your parents (disregarding the race issue for a moment) I'd certainly be damned upset that you could have been exposed to serious criminal elements and the seedier side of life. For stealing chocolate. I would be suing the pants off the police.


    That makes it alright then?
    The extreme punishment was losing and having to rebuild the trust of my parents.

    The imprisonment was nothing.

    But that aside, at the very least, it gave me a lot of things to think about and the whole ordeal made me much wiser. And I don't blame the system for a single thing. I think it is (should be) healthy, especially at a crucial age like 12, to be in contact with law enforcing. I don't regret a thing about it myself anyways.

    Oh and as far as my parents go, all I remember from being picked up at the police station after the imprisonment was a flat hand in my face and my ears ringing from the sound of the slap. :P
    ~Self-depricating Megalomaniacal Superwolf

  7. #7
    Senior Member Shimmy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    MBTI
    SEXY
    Posts
    1,868

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by FireyPheonix View Post
    That makes it alright then?
    I can't help thinking I should feel slightly offended if you think that I think that mistreating another human being is ever okay. Might I therefore make the suggestion that you interpret my previous post as: "We should encourage justice and fairness everywhere on the world. As for this case in particular, it's wrong, but I don't feel particularly connected to it."
    (removed)

  8. #8
    lab rat extraordinaire CrystalViolet's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    MBTI
    XNFP
    Enneagram
    5w4 sx/sp
    Posts
    2,170

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Shimmy View Post
    I can't help thinking I should feel slightly offended if you think that I think that mistreating another human being is ever okay. Might I therefore make the suggestion that you interpret my previous post as: "We should encourage justice and fairness everywhere on the world. As for this case in particular, it's wrong, but I don't feel particularly connected to it."
    That's half the problem that no one connects to the aborignal situation, not even Australians. The comment wasn't paticularly directed at you, but rather my reaction towards a dismissive stance. There are so many other "bigger isssues" that things like this just get swept under the capert and ignored.
    I was also reasonably shocked that no-one else seems to see the injustice here.
    Currently submerged under an avalanche of books and paper work. I may come back up for air from time to time.
    Real life awaits and she is a demanding mistress.

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

  9. #9
    mountain surfing nomadic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    MBTI
    enfp
    Posts
    1,709

    Default

    its probably because they view him as a "monster" and have no sense of objective counterbalance.

    anyways, it sucks to be that guy. often times, if there is no political power to ensure equality or fair treatment, guns and force is a last resort for ppl in this type of situation. sort of like how the boston tea party was an almost last resort. or many wars even.

  10. #10
    Diabolical Kasper's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Enneagram
    9w8 so/sx
    Posts
    11,544

    Default

    I'm quite at a loss to the title for this. As if somehow if the Australian Government really meant sorry Aborigines who break the law just a little won't be arrested.

    Is your suggestion that the arrest is racially motivated? That the exact same circumstances with a white kid would have had different results? If so, I say bullocks.

    If the child was a middle-class white kid living in the burbs then I say they are less likely to be arrested for continually breaking the law because they are less likely to break the law not because the police treat them differently. The difference here is education and services available to those of lower socioeconomic groups.

    Quote Originally Posted by FireyPheonix View Post
    I was also reasonably shocked that no-one else seems to see the injustice here.
    Where is the injustice? Does it seem extreme for a kid to be arrested under those circumstances, yes, does that clearly indicate that there is more to this? Definitely.

    If a child is continually breaking the law (which is the suggestion in the article) then either their parents don't care or are unable to control them. Guess where they're heading unless someone steps in.

    Let's look at the bigger picture here, when compared to the percentage of Aborigines in the population our prisons have an unequal amount of Aborigines in custody. What are the causes of this? You can't claim it's because the police are racist and only arrest minorities, these men and women have broken the law, they deserve to be arrested it's what happens in civilised society, there's two possible scenarios here: They are more likely to get caught or they are more likely to break the law. I suggest it's the latter.

    Today's juvenile delinquents are tomorrows prisoners. The police have this kid on their radar, I doubt they're 'out to get him', he has been in trouble before and is still on their radar that means something needs to change before he turns 18 and ends up in serious trouble.

    The problem is not this boy being arrested, the problem is that those from poorer neighbourhoods are more likely to break the law due to lack of education. The problem is that Australian Aborigines are more likely to be in those poorer neighbourhoods. It's a serious issue that does need to be looked at but the causes need to be addressed properly.

    Btw: The case is not going to court, the charges have been withdrawn and will go to the Juvenile Justice Team who work with families to try to help before it's too late.

    Quote Originally Posted by http://www.optuszoo.com.au/news
    this morning, Commissioner Karl O'Callaghan told ABC radio he now wanted the charges withdrawn and referred to the state's juvenile justice team.

    "They will not actually be dropped, but sent to the juvenile justice team," Mr O'Callaghan said.

    "The first I knew about them was when they were in the media yesterday and I asked for a review.

    "The normal process is that if they have been before the JJT in subsequent times they go to court. Although there had been an original matter that had been through to the JJT, it had not been heard.

    "So the proper process would be to have both of these issues dealt with by the JJT.

    "I have spoken to the commander they consult for that area, and asked if they could consult with the ALS to withdraw that charge from the court and refer it back to the JJT.

    "It is quite a complicated case, and there are a lot of issues behind it which we are not allowed to discuss publicly. But we do have to follow a recognised process."
    I doubt this is about a freddo.

Similar Threads

  1. So Much for Lenore Thomson's *ahem* "Tertiaries"
    By Mal12345 in forum Myers-Briggs and Jungian Cognitive Functions
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 06-25-2013, 12:00 PM
  2. Colorful Sayings/Quotes
    By ladypinkington in forum The Bonfire
    Replies: 39
    Last Post: 05-10-2010, 06:28 PM
  3. Replies: 3
    Last Post: 07-25-2007, 11:49 PM
  4. How Do You Post So Much?
    By Crabapple in forum The Fluff Zone
    Replies: 25
    Last Post: 05-17-2007, 03:54 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO