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  1. #11
    ^He pronks, too! Magic Poriferan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pure_mercury View Post
    And American teenagers work more than their contemporaries in almost any other country. We're taught to get jobs when we are able. That is kinda nice.
    Mehh.. I do what I need to. If the society expects me to do so much work to meet my needs, so be it. Given the choice though, I'd take leisure over production.
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  2. #12
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    Do you think there is a difference in the generations?

    Every generation is different. It's inherent to the conditions of the society and time frame of coming along.

    Is this a good or bad thing?

    It's a good thing in that the boomers who have had control over government and corporations for well over a decade, have ruined the nation their parents built.

    How is it going to affect American companies?

    During this economic downturn, it's easier for people over thirty to land a new job. Older workers will remain in the workforce longer...which leads to the thought below.

    And a bonus question:
    Why do so many people live in their parent's basements now?

    It shocked me to learn that 33 percent of people under the age of thirty-five still live at
    home. Even people in their forties have moved back in with their parents, due to a continuous cycle of boom, bubble, and bust.

    The average American concept, two parents and children living in a home, is no longer true. They comprise only 22 percent of the total population. It'll be interesting to see what happens next, exactly what will emerge as being the average American concept, post it's death...two hundred years later.

    That's huge!

  3. #13
    Senior Member millerm277's Avatar
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    Personal experience: When in the workforce, the younger people are just as productive as the others, if you measure them on what they do, not on what they appear to be doing when you walk by. Yes, we like our MP3 Players, Cell Phones, and internet. But, if we're at a job, we usually do our work. The fact that we might have earbuds in while we do it, doesn't actually change how much we do. (I learned early on to keep the electronics hidden, and point the monitor away from the sight of the cubical door.)
    I-95%, S-84%, T-89%, P-84%

  4. #14
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    Do you think there is a difference in the generations?
    Definitely. More than anything, the younger generation is entitled. That can manifest in being lazy. Though the parents of kids that worked hard to become upper class, tend to be really hard on their kids and expect just as much from them.

    Is this a good or bad thing?
    The lack of drive doesn't bode well for the future.

    How is it going to affect American companies?
    Work is already outsourced.

    Why do so many people live in their parent's basements now?
    I have no idea whether this is true or not. I guess, the economy.

  5. #15
    Protocol Droid Athenian200's Avatar
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    Honestly? I'm lazy because I don't feel like it makes a difference to anyone else whether I work or not.

    I wasn't rewarded for hard work in school, back when I cared enough to work hard. They just tossed me the same diploma as everyone else in the end, and I was actually punished when looking for a job because I chose to focus solely on schoolwork and not do anything extracurricular. I had assumed that was all extra, frivolous, and that I wanted good grades. And then I found that despite having a diploma, I wasn't in any better position to get a job that I was before I got it. The people around me were getting jobs because of who they knew and what they'd already done... the diploma barely meant anything. If I'd known that, I'd have spent High School socializing and blowing off my schoolwork. I feel like the people around me got rewarded for doing frivolous things, while I got nothing for doing what I was supposed to do.

    The other reason is that, well, working hard just makes me depressed because it feels like spinning my wheels, especially when I'm expected to do it under my own power. It never gets me anything except silence, no matter how many applications I turn in, because no one even wants to look at them due to my inexperience and lack of qualifications due to inexperience.

    In other words, I'm lazy because I've learned that my work is not rewarded or appreciated by others, and I'm just supposed to value it as a virtue in and of itself? Umm... sorry, no.

    Quote Originally Posted by sLiPpY View Post
    It shocked me to learn that 33 percent of people under the age of thirty-five still live at
    home. Even people in their forties have moved back in with their parents, due to a continuous cycle of boom, bubble, and bust.


    It feels like I don't live in a world of choices or freedom, but of need and dependence.

    That means I've got to be more competent and qualified than those 33 percent in order to even have a shot. Have you any idea how discouraging that is to someone with no skills and experience?

  6. #16
    pathwise dependent FDG's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pure_mercury View Post
    Every older generation says this about the next one coming up.
    Yeah, it's kind of idiotic. I'm already starting to see 22-yo people that complain about 16-yo.

    Personal experience: When in the workforce, the younger people are just as productive as the others, if you measure them on what they do, not on what they appear to be doing when you walk by. Yes, we like our MP3 Players, Cell Phones, and internet. But, if we're at a job, we usually do our work. The fact that we might have earbuds in while we do it, doesn't actually change how much we do. (I learned early on to keep the electronics hidden, and point the monitor away from the sight of the cubical door.)
    Exactly. It's to be expected tho that people that are 30 years older will consider the 30 years younger to be inferior. Since social relationships have become more horizontal in comparison to the time when they (the older ones) started working, the interaction will probably have a problematic feel. In any case, I've often experienced a 50 or 60 years old worker not acknowledging my "superior" knowledge about a given topic because I was "too young". This probably skews the results even more: if you don't even acknowledge ability, you will surely feel like those people are less talented. I've also seen an older co-worker or family member pushing his incorrect knowledge over younger ones (I'm not speaking about way of life - I'm talking about facts or technical knowledge, which can only be right or wrong, without subjective feel).

    Anyway, to be completely honest, I am not certain that working very hard (more than 45 hours a week) is a strategy that globally, on the long term, benefits humanity? I'm not certain that it isn't, either, but since having more money accelerates the rate of consumption, and since a part of our problems seem to be rooted in the fact that we expect the economic system to be ever-growing (while instead it seems to follow a logarithmic curve), well - I don't know how to end this.
    Certainly it seems good for countries that are still developing, though.
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  7. #17
    Don't Judge Me! Haphazard's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elaur View Post
    Basically the idea is that the youngins think that they don't have to work if they don't like the work, they don't think they have to work hard, all the time.
    Well, I thought this was interesting in your article there:

    "Gen Y has the lowest expectations among the four generations for "soft" workplace benefits of satisfying work, pleasant work environment, liking the people they work with, challenging work and flexible hours."

    This is a disaffected generation. They believe that work isn't supposed to be pleasant at all. It's just something you do because you have to and you can't expect any small comfort from your employer. Pretty much, they expect that work is not Flinstones vitamins but rather a huge suppository.

    Quote Originally Posted by FDG View Post
    Anyway, to be completely honest, I am not certain that working very hard (more than 45 hours a week) is a strategy that globally, on the long term, benefits humanity? I'm not certain that it isn't, either, but since having more money accelerates the rate of consumption, and since a part of our problems seem to be rooted in the fact that we expect the economic system to be ever-growing (while instead it seems to follow a logarithmic curve), well - I don't know how to end this.
    Certainly it seems good for countries that are still developing, though.
    This is what I was thinking. Maybe if we're not working 50-60 hour weeks we can finally focus on something else.
    -Carefully taking sips from the Fire Hose of Knowledge

  8. #18
    Order Now! pure_mercury's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Haphazard View Post
    This is what I was thinking. Maybe if we're not working 50-60 hour weeks we can finally focus on something else.
    Like learning Chinese to communicate with our new CEO's?
    Who wants to try a bottle of merc's "Extroversion Olive Oil?"

  9. #19
    pathwise dependent FDG's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pure_mercury View Post
    Like learning Chinese to communicate with our new CEO's?
    Most Europeans work less than Americans, yet our CEOs aren't any more American or Chinese.
    ENTj 7-3-8 sx/sp

  10. #20
    Senior Member avolkiteshvara's Avatar
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    Alot of it stems from child psychology theories from the 1970s that said reward your child no matter what. Third place means you are third best. No one is a loser.

    I'll see if I can find the name of it.


    Alot of the Profs. that I work with though say that they see it getting worse generation over generation. That students are getting lazier and coming up with more excuses why they didn't get their work done.

    They are also more more adaptable though, so another side of the coin.

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