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  1. #101
    Freshman Member simulatedworld's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by marmalade.sunrise View Post
    Yes, it is. The fact that you are unable to see how much of what you say (and also some of what I say) is totally opinion does make you seem a little stupid.

    This isn't an insult war. We aren't in the 8th grade. Nothing that you say will make you "win." I perceive you as having a blind, dogmatic allegiance to capitalism and you think I am "insane" for socialist leanings. There is really nothing left to discuss at this point.
    Merc has good principles but doesn't seem to recognize their practical limitations.
    If you could be anything you want, I bet you'd be disappointed--am I right?

  2. #102
    Freshman Member simulatedworld's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Synarch View Post
    My entire life has been built around ensuring that I have the maximum amount of leisure.
    yesssss ENTP ftw
    If you could be anything you want, I bet you'd be disappointed--am I right?

  3. #103
    Nickle Iron Silicone Charmed Justice's Avatar
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    Do you think there is a difference in the generations? Very very broadly speaking, yes.
    Is this a good or bad thing? It's a normal thing, neither good nor bad. I think the generation "gaps" could be largely avoided if we stopped separating young people and older people the way we do so often. We all have something to learn from each other, and the way most of our society is set up creates gaps in understanding and impedes us from valuing those older or younger.
    How is it going to affect American companies? Well, just a few things:
    Companies are going to have to begin valuing creativity more, and efficiency less. In a post-Industrial age, it seems that quality is often more important than quantity. This also apparently applies to relationships, as younger generations seem to care more about the quality of their relationships than older generations.

    Fathers will want to take leave when their wives are in the hospital giving birth, and many corporations have been taking note and action on this issue for years now. As fathers take a more active role in the lives of their children, they may also want to take some extended parental leave and stay home and help out with the baby. Many parents are opting to stay home and care for their youngest.

    Younger generations, from the middle class, may be more likely to use their family vacation time for relaxation, or to bond with their family members. Many places of employment have on-site childcare, as many parents become more leary about leaving their children in far away places. And with the younger generations being more inclined to want to do things on their own time and in their own way, and perhaps being more self-motivated, more and more companies are offering an option to telecommute and set your own hours.

    Why do so many people live in their parent's basements now?
    I think there are many reasons for this, but one study showed that younger generations have better relationships with their parents than did older ones. So many young people probably stay home because they actually like their parents, and their parents actually like them too.

    Further, youth gets extended further into adulthood the more generations go by. There are, of course, pros and cons to this, but mostly, it's just a testament to longevity. Longer lifespans. We don't die at 45 anymore, so we don't need to live our entire lives out at such relatively young ages.

    The younger generations seem to prioritize work less, and seem to value "living" more. Sure, you have to work to live, but I'm thinking that the younger ones will find something, demand something, closer to a personal balance.
    There is a thinking stuff from which all things are made, and which, in its original state, permeates, penetrates, and fills the interspaces of the universe.

  4. #104
    Oberon
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    Quote Originally Posted by Athenian200 View Post
    You know, if it's really that much of an issue, maybe you should think about getting rid of the dogs.
    It's one dog, and she belongs to my nine-year-old son. Getting rid of the dog would cost me far more in relationship with my son than it would yield in dollar savings.

    ...and you know, that's really why I posted that story, of course... so I could get parenting advice from the Athenian.

  5. #105
    Senior Member Lateralus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pure_mercury View Post
    Well, the land "value" (like, the price) would still be based upon what it would fetch on the open market. But the government would have a set value at which it would assess land for tax purposes (by the acre, or whatever measurement), and the rent would be levied. It would encourage capital improvements and using the land for some type of economic function, rather than hoarding it without use. So, if you owned 100 acres with a mansion on it, and someone else owned 100 acres with several office buildings, or a school, or a parking lot and shopping center on it, but you were paying the same taxes, it would encourage you to have a smaller estate and sell off some land. Or to open a park or to grow some crops or something. There would still be land that was more valuable on the market or to rent on. Los Angeles apartments would fetch more rent than Detroit apartments, and beach houses would cost more to buy than houses inland. George was also in favor of a sweet citizens' dividend from any leftover funds from the land value tax, which would basically be an equal payment to every adult in society, landowner or not.
    Encouraging development in this way is not necessarily a good idea. I think it would encourage urban sprawl.

    Farmers taxes would surely go up. And while commercial farmers may be able to adjust, I could see it having a major negative effect on small farmers. Perhaps the tax should be varied based on land use.
    "We grow up thinking that beliefs are something to be proud of, but they're really nothing but opinions one refuses to reconsider. Beliefs are easy. The stronger your beliefs are, the less open you are to growth and wisdom, because "strength of belief" is only the intensity with which you resist questioning yourself. As soon as you are proud of a belief, as soon as you think it adds something to who you are, then you've made it a part of your ego."

  6. #106
    Order Now! pure_mercury's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FDG View Post
    C'mon now, you can't really believe that. What economic good did people who win the lottery did to society? It's not about talents, it's just random. If you're born rich, good for you, your parents likely provided a lot good stuff to society, but you're not more "productive". You're brainwashed by ideology.
    Buying lottery tickets alleviates some tax burden for people smart enough not to play the lottery, since the proceeds go to things like public schools, programs for seniors, etc.
    Who wants to try a bottle of merc's "Extroversion Olive Oil?"

  7. #107
    Order Now! pure_mercury's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by simulatedworld View Post
    Merc has good principles but doesn't seem to recognize their practical limitations.
    How do you know what the practical limitations of libertarianism are?
    Who wants to try a bottle of merc's "Extroversion Olive Oil?"

  8. #108
    Order Now! pure_mercury's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lateralus View Post
    Encouraging development in this way is not necessarily a good idea. I think it would encourage urban sprawl.
    If "urban sprawl" is what the market wants, then that may well happen. Look at Houston. No zoning laws, highways everywhere, sprawling and ugly. It also happens to be one of the fastest-growing major cities in America.


    Farmers taxes would surely go up. And while commercial farmers may be able to adjust, I could see it having a major negative effect on small farmers. Perhaps the tax should be varied based on land use.
    Well wince income taxes would be eliminated and excise taxes decreased significantly, I think taxes for almost everyone would be decreased. The relative tax burden would be shifted to owners of large amounts of land. Hong Kong seems to do well with their land value tax, although their system is somewhat tainted by the government being the monopoly landowner. We don't have that problem in the United States. . . yet. Also, small farming is pretty inefficient economically in this day and age. Many small farmers would have sold out long ago if they didn't have cheap government loans, price floors, high tariffs, subsidies. etc. Those are the most market-distorting taxes/disbursements of all.
    Who wants to try a bottle of merc's "Extroversion Olive Oil?"

  9. #109
    Freshman Member simulatedworld's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pure_mercury View Post
    How do you know what the practical limitations of libertarianism are?
    Ne
    If you could be anything you want, I bet you'd be disappointed--am I right?

  10. #110
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    Quote Originally Posted by pure_mercury View Post
    I am a sports fan, there are tons of lazy-ass athletes out there. But someone with billions of dollars decided to pay them millions or tens of millions of dollars because they will get more than that back in the utility these athletes provide.
    Just because people are willing to pay for something does not necessarily mean that it has objective value. Obvious examples would be drugs like opium. Even though the demand is great, we restrict their consumption because we recognize that our society would be harmed in the long run.

    The same value judgment can be applied to people like Paris Hilton. She might make a lot of money, but if everyone were to emulate her, the competitiveness of our nation would be negatively impacted.

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