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  1. #1
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    Default Oklahoma Abortion Law: Details To Be Publicly Posted Online

    A new Oklahoma law requires physicians to disclose detailed information on women's abortions to the State's Department Of Health, which will then post the collected data on a public website. The controversial measure comes into effect on November 1 and will cost $281,285 to implement, $256,285 each subsequent year to maintain.

    Oklahoma women undergoing abortion procedures will be legally forced to reveal:

    1) Date of abortion
    2) County in which abortion is performed
    3) Age of mother
    4) Marital status of mother
    5) Race of mother
    6) Years of education of mother
    7) State or foreign country of residence of mother
    8) Total number of previous pregnancies of the mother

    Proponents of the legislation claim that women should not be concerned over their privacy since no names or "personal information" will be reported. This defense is questionable. Feminists For Choice argues, "In reviewing the actual text of the law, the first 8 questions that will be asked and reported could easily be used to identify any member of a smaller community."

    The Center For Reproductive Rights, former state Rep. Wanda Jo Stapleton (D-Okla.), and Okla. resident Lora Joyce David have filed a lawsuit to prevent this contentious abortion bill from going into effect, on the grounds that it violates the state's constitution.

    Oklahoma Abortion Law: Details To Be Publicly Posted Online
    Does this violate HIPAA?

  2. #2
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    No, I dont think it violates HIPPA. For it to violate it, I think they would have to release names as well. It seems similar to collection of hiv/aids patients stats for public health research.

  3. #3
    Habitual Fi LineStepper JocktheMotie's Avatar
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    While I'm not against the collection and maintenance of statistical data in such cases, there doesn't really seem to be a good reason it needs to be public.



  4. #4
    Strongly Ambivalent Ivy's Avatar
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    Do they release detailed HIV/AIDS patient stats online for public consumption?
    The one who buggers a fire burns his penis
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    On a mission Usehername's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JocktheMotie View Post
    While I'm not against the collection and maintenance of statistical data in such cases, there doesn't really seem to be a good reason it needs to be public.
    x2. Statistics are necessary to appropriately allocate resources according to needs, but making it public seems like a sly pro-life move. Unless I'm missing something.
    *You don't have a soul. You are a Soul. You have a body.
    *Faith is the art of holding on to things your reason once accepted, despite your changing moods.
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  6. #6
    Minister of Propagandhi ajblaise's Avatar
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    If it's true that this information could be used to track down someone in a small town who had an abortion, I can't see any public health info argument outweighing the privacy issue. It seems like a backhanded way to discourage abortion.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ivy View Post
    Do they release detailed HIV/AIDS patient stats online for public consumption?
    Yeah, they do HIV/AIDS, Sexually Transmitted Disease (STD), and Tuberculosis Data and Statistics You can look hiv/aids in almost any area of the country and see how many people have been diagnosed including age, gender and race.

    If I had to pick a side I would be considered pro-choice, but I would rather prevent the need for an abortion in the first place. If it includes collecting information I think it is ok, as long as names aren't included.

  8. #8
    Strongly Ambivalent Ivy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tewt View Post
    Yeah, they do HIV/AIDS, Sexually Transmitted Disease (STD), and Tuberculosis Data and Statistics You can look hiv/aids in almost any area of the country and see how many people have been diagnosed including age, gender and race.

    If I had to pick a side I would be considered pro-choice, but I would rather prevent the need for an abortion in the first place. If it includes collecting information I think it is ok, as long as names aren't included.
    That's not even remotely close to comparable. If this goes through, each abortion is going to have a papertrail online in the form of an "individual abortion report," which is many pages long and includes pretty much everything but the mother's name, address, and phone number.
    The one who buggers a fire burns his penis
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  9. #9
    Strongly Ambivalent Ivy's Avatar
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    I think this is unconstitutional. The US Census is not allowed to release any of the individual information it collects (not limited to name/address/etc) for 80 years after it is collected.

    Personally identifiable information - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    The following are often used for the express purpose of distinguishing individual identity, and thus are clearly PII under the OMB definition:
    • Full name (if not common)
    • National identification number
    • IP address (in some cases)
    • Vehicle registration plate number
    • Driver's license number
    • Face, fingerprints, or handwriting
    • Credit card numbers
    • Digital identity
    • Birthday
    • Birth Place

    The following are less often used to distinguish individual identity, because they are traits shared by many people. However, they are potentially PII, because there is the potential that they may be combined with other personal information to identify an individual.
    • First or last name, if common
    • Country, state, or city of residence
    • Age, especially if non-specific
    • Gender or race
    • Name of the school they attend or workplace
    • Grades, salary, or job position
    • Criminal record

    When a person wishes to remain anonymous, descriptions of them will often employ several of the above, such as "a 34-year-old white man who works at Target". Note that information can still be private, in the sense that a person may not wish for it to become publicly known, without being personally identifiable. Moreover, sometimes multiple pieces of information, none sufficient by itself to uniquely identify an individual, may uniquely identify a person when combined; this is one reason that multiple pieces of evidence are usually presented at criminal trials. It has been shown that 87% of the population in the United States is likely to be uniquely identified by only gender, date of birth and ZIP code.
    The one who buggers a fire burns his penis
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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ivy View Post
    That's not even remotely close to comparable. If this goes through, each abortion is going to have a papertrail online in the form of an "individual abortion report," which is many pages long and includes pretty much everything but the mother's name, address, and phone number.
    I think if it is posted publically in individual form, then yes it can be identifiable and wrong and would violate HIPPA. The way I read the article in the original post I didn't see that individual reports would be posted, but the information from reports collected and then reported statistically. (this is the first time I am hearing about and just going off the one article though) So yeah, depending on how the information released would affect my opinion.

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