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  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by kyuuei View Post
    ^ I understand the sentiments.. but he won't get through to people that way. As smart as he is, he must understand that. If the goal is getting through to people to help them, things would be done in a more effective pattern (as obviously the current shock method isn't working.).. To give up his position of authority and credibility to back up his cause wouldn't be the smartest decision made by someone who's actions are motivated to help others.

    This seems a bit self absorbed and self righteous, the way his actions are. Too over the top, without any consideration for the people around him, for me to take his actions as the sound judgement of a nutritionist interested in my health.
    He shouldn't have used crude words for body parts. I agree that it was a bit much. What methods do you think would be most effective for reaching the average person?

    A nutritionist doesn't have extensive knowledge of biochemistry. A doctor should be a nutritionist. Disease is solely caused by damage to cells. That occurs via two routes. One is toxic overload/foreign bodies, and the other is deficiency. Deficiency occurs when an individual doesn't get the correct amount of nutrients in their diet. Toxic overload occurs through the pollution of air, water, personal hygiene/home/work products, and processed food. America is a nation of overfed and malnourished (nutrient deficient) people. The combination of deficiency in diet and toxic overload is what's killing everyone. Doctors attempt to cure disease. It only makes sense that they tackle the root of the problem.

    I think most people are under the impression that fat/sugar resulting in weight gain is the main issue. Alone, it really isn't. Every human body needs those elements to be at their healthiest. The crux is that the body is unable to metabolize the chemicals that come with eating junk food.

    Aspartame for example, eventually becomes formaldehyde inside the body. People that consume a large amount of this chemical are literally poisoning themselves over time. Numerous chemicals that cause disease are approved by the FDA all the time. Those chemicals go into many processed foods that people believe to be benign. It is most definitely killing people every single day.

    I wouldn't say shock value is bad per se, because many people truly aren't aware of what is in the food and beverages they consume on a daily basis. Equating junk food with being obese, as opposed to the straw that breaks the camel's back in an environment where people already absorb pollution on every level, is more important than obesity alone. I believe a doctor is the best person to convey that message.

  2. #32
    Allergic to Mornings ergophobe's Avatar
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    Default Wish doctor was my boss

    So, a health professional whose job it is to educate people about better health practices decides to take on a major cause of disease in the United States. Even better, he decides it may be a good idea to set examples in his own department by discouraging unhealthy eating. What's wrong with that?

    I don't understand the basis for his resignation besides the donut lobby he seemingly angered with his sign.

    I also don't think there's anything wrong with using thunder thighs or love handles in his signs -- anyone with a sense of humor should be able to get the real message without being offended. He wasn't targeting an individual, he was targeting a societal problem. Why the suggested tiptoeing?

    Most people who are working on fighting the disease of obesity would likely thank him for his help. Do you know how hard it is to find healthy snacks in a regular machine? I'll take issue with just substituting with peanuts (he gets low points for originality) -- there are plenty other options, but the effort is to be lauded.

    Charity starts at home. If a health education professional decides to make his department an example of good health, I suggest we use it as a model across the country, and not fire someone who is actually not afraid to address the issue.

  3. #33
    Strongly Ambivalent Ivy's Avatar
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    This is very true, ergophobe. I've found it more expensive and time-consuming to eat healthily than just grab any old thing. I can't count on a healthy snack being available wherever I go. Much of what I eat needs refrigeration.

    This is an extremely pervasive problem in the Western (with apologies to Samuel de Mazarin wherever he is) world. Even our infrastructure is becoming geared to a sedentary lifestyle. Sprawl makes walking or biking everywhere unrealistic for many of us, and many apartment complexes have rules against children playing outside without an adult right there beside them, which means less outdoor play, which means more indoor sitting around.

    I read a blog called calorielab, which is the most objective diet-type blog I've found to date. Sometimes it's disheartening to keep up with the research on obesity--the doctor isn't wrong, not by a long shot. Unless you take him overly literally on the death thing. I don't think he intended his carry-away message to be that eating a donut will mean you die immediately. It's a lifestyle that consists of junk foods in an inflated proportion to whole foods that is killing us, myself included as a trying-to-be-reformed fatty. On that count he's entirely right. I just think offending the people you're trying to reach isn't probably the best way to go about it.

    I highly recommend the book Eat to Live by Dr. Joel Fuhrman. It really changed my outlook on food. Since I read it a few years ago I've been trying to achieve what he recommends, though I find it near-impossible to do alone. It's easier for me when modified/assisted by The Shangri-La Diet by Seth Roberts, to control hunger and cravings.
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  4. #34
    Oberon
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    Quote Originally Posted by dga View Post
    yea, anyone that took issue is probably punching their mouth with yet another brick to build their house of fat.

    if you jiggle like jello, put down the fucking donut
    If I jiggle like jello, it's none of your fucking business.

  5. #35
    Strongly Ambivalent Ivy's Avatar
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    Isn't it the business of the head of a county health department to keep tabs on the collective health of the community he's charged with serving? It doesn't sound like he singled anyone out, which would be humiliating.
    The one who buggers a fire burns his penis
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  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ivy View Post
    Isn't it the business of the head of a county health department to keep tabs on the collective health of the community he's charged with serving? It doesn't sound like he singled anyone out, which would be humiliating.
    Sure. My beef was with dga, not the doctor. It occurred to me that I managed to single myself out, but I was unable to ascertain whether I did so because of my love of donuts or my love of independence. Go figure.

    EDIT: It was probably the independence. I really don't like donuts that much.

  7. #37
    Strongly Ambivalent Ivy's Avatar
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    I find donuts to be easier to resist than some other forms of junk.

    I was just poking around for more info about this and I came across a statistic that alarmed me: on average, Americans get 93% of their daily calories from non-vegetable sources. The healthiest societies with the lowest rates of cancer have that ratio flipped around the other way, and get most or all of their daily calories from vegetable sources.
    The one who buggers a fire burns his penis
    -anonymous graffiti in the basilica at Pompeii

  8. #38
    Oberon
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ivy View Post
    I find donuts to be easier to resist than some other forms of junk.

    I was just poking around for more info about this and I came across a statistic that alarmed me: on average, Americans get 93% of their daily calories from non-vegetable sources. The healthiest societies with the lowest rates of cancer have that ratio flipped around the other way, and get most or all of their daily calories from vegetable sources.
    I strongly doubt that your statistic is valid. These days, sugars, starches and fats form the bulk of the American calorie count, and almost all of these any more come from vegetable sources.

    Now we all know that high-fructose corn syrup isn't a vegetable, but it surely does come from a vegetable source.

  9. #39
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    You're kind of missing the point there, Oberon. I wouldn't necessarily be touting that most of the calories I get from vegetables is due to high fructose corn syrup.
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  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blank View Post
    You're kind of missing the point there, Oberon. I wouldn't necessarily be touting that most of the calories I get from vegetables is due to high fructose corn syrup.
    You have utterly lost me, Blank.

    My point is that there are two potential sources for food calories, those being "animal" and "vegetable." If 93 percent of a person's calories are coming from non-vegetable sources, that means that the vast bulk of a person's calories are coming from animal sources, i.e. meat, animal fat, and dairy.

    I don't believe that's anywhere close to being true, because such a diet is prohibitively expensive here in the states. Consquently, that leads me to wonder how Ivy's source parsed their data. What do they mean by vegetable and non-vegetable, after all? Technically, a large order of fries is 100-percent vegetable-sourced food.

    I'm thinking that Ivy's source actually means dietary vegetables when they refer to vegetable sources, which would mean broccoli, beans, salads, green leafies, beets, and so on. That I can probably buy, as those sources are low in calories to begin with.

    What I really couldn't understand is how a person could eat so much in the way of table vegetables as to get over 90 percent of his calories from such sources, as Ivy reported sometimes happens in other societies. That's a lotta d@mn carrots.

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