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View Poll Results: Vegetarians?

Voters
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  • E, Vegetarian

    4 7.41%
  • I, Vegetarian

    13 24.07%
  • S, Vegetarian

    1 1.85%
  • N, Vegetarian

    15 27.78%
  • T, Vegetarian

    9 16.67%
  • F, Vegetarian

    8 14.81%
  • J, Vegetarian

    4 7.41%
  • P, Vegetarian

    12 22.22%
  • E, No vegetarian

    10 18.52%
  • I, No vegetarian

    23 42.59%
  • S, No vegetarian

    8 14.81%
  • N, No vegetarian

    23 42.59%
  • T, No vegetarian

    21 38.89%
  • F, No Vegetarian

    12 22.22%
  • J, No Vegetarian

    13 24.07%
  • P, No Vegetarian

    21 38.89%
Multiple Choice Poll.
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Results 51 to 60 of 88

  1. #51
    Perfect Gentleman! =D d@v3's Avatar
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    I couldn't be one even if I tried.
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  2. #52
    Order Now! pure_mercury's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MDP2525 View Post
    Sorry. This reeks of pretentiousness to me. Enjoying delicious food has nothing to do with intelligence and refinement.

    I would disagree wholeheartedly. Things like food are quotidian for the majority of people, but putting effort into learning about food, learning to cook well, patronizing fine dining establishments (or even casual restaurants that make particularly good food) is a sign of appreciating quality whilst also enjoying yourself. I don't see how that's "pretentious."
    Who wants to try a bottle of merc's "Extroversion Olive Oil?"

  3. #53
    (☞゚∀゚)☞ The Decline's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pure_mercury View Post
    If you mention vegetarianism, you don't think it's normal for someone to talk about their own omnivorism? That seems odd to me.
    No, in the context I provided above, they brought up my vegetarianism, and then they talked about their own omnivorism. I wasn't offended, I just don't like being forced to bring up my vegetarianism and all of my values, aside from the simple and necessary "hey guys I can't eat meat just so you know" during social food situations. If I could make an analogy, it's as if you've told a friend that you can't hang out with them on Sunday morning because you attend church, and they proceed to indulge themselves in a discussion about yours and their own differing religious beliefs.
    "Stop it, you fuck. Give him some butter."
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  4. #54
    Senior Member chasingAJ's Avatar
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    I had to quit being a vegetarian for health reasons.

    I'm carbohydrate sensitive, if I don't balance carbs and protein well then I am starving all day, dizzy, headaches... even when my calories are high enough. I tried with soy protein but I found that the phytoestrogen in soy caused major problems with my hormones/reproductive system. I was a vegetarian because I wanted to be healthier but I have found that not eating anything processed is more effective for feeling healthier. My best friend is the opposite. If she eats as much protein as I do she feels sluggish and ill. I think that each person has a different body and that we should fuel our bodies based on the biofeedback they give us. If you feel better eating vegetarian, it's the right way for you. I just don't. My ideal diet is seafood, chicken, beef (ground beef is not beef in my world), fresh cheeses and all the fruits/veggies I can get my hands on. The occasional brown rice, pasta or fresh bread is good too.

  5. #55
    Senior Member lowtech redneck's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by metaphours View Post
    Considering your username, I'm not surprised you gave that answer.
    Quote Originally Posted by metaphours View Post
    ^ You're so right. I hate it when people (celebrities do this a lot) just indulge in vegetarianism as a form of Elitism.
    You were saying?

  6. #56
    Rainy Day Woman MDP2525's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pure_mercury View Post
    I would disagree wholeheartedly. Things like food are quotidian for the majority of people, but putting effort into learning about food, learning to cook well, patronizing fine dining establishments (or even casual restaurants that make particularly good food) is a sign of appreciating quality whilst also enjoying yourself. I don't see how that's "pretentious."
    You said enjoying delicious food is a sign of intelligence and refinement. I hate when people say this about food. Food is sensory. It is hedonistic. It's an adventure. Let's not place a diploma in its hand and make it do calculus.

    In fine dining establishments people are paying for the quality of the atmosphere just as much as the food. I'm not saying the food isn't fantastic. It is. But I can enjoy a perfectly cooked fillet just as much as a Steak-N-Shake burger at 3 a.m. I may appreciate the fillet more but only because I don't have it as often. Doesn't make either one better or more refined than the other and it doesn't make me more or less intelligent that I can savor both. Anthony Bourdain said it better than I could:

    "Meals make the society, hold the fabric together in lots of ways that were charming and interesting and intoxicating to me. The perfect meal, or the best meals, occur in a context that frequently has very little to do with the food itself."
    ~luck favors the ready~


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  7. #57
    Order Now! pure_mercury's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Decline View Post
    No, in the context I provided above, they brought up my vegetarianism, and then they talked about their own omnivorism. I wasn't offended, I just don't like being forced to bring up my vegetarianism and all of my values, aside from the simple and necessary "hey guys I can't eat meat just so you know" during social food situations. If I could make an analogy, it's as if you've told a friend that you can't hang out with them on Sunday morning because you attend church, and they proceed to indulge themselves in a discussion about yours and their own differing religious beliefs.

    I guess I wouldn't feel self-conscious about discussing my religious beliefs or lack thereof, so it wouldn't bother me. I don't mind listening to other people's beliefs, either. Topics like these are interesting to me.
    Who wants to try a bottle of merc's "Extroversion Olive Oil?"

  8. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by MDP2525 View Post
    You said enjoying delicious food is a sign of intelligence and refinement. I hate when people say this about food. Food is sensory. It is hedonistic. It's an adventure. Let's not place a diploma in its hand and make it do calculus.

    In fine dining establishments people are paying for the quality of the atmosphere just as much as the food. I'm not saying the food isn't fantastic. It is. But I can enjoy a perfectly cooked fillet just as much as a Steak-N-Shake burger at 3 a.m. I may appreciate the fillet more but only because I don't have it as often. Doesn't make either one better or more refined than the other and it doesn't make me more or less intelligent that I can savor both. Anthony Bourdain said it better than I could:

    "Meals make the society, hold the fabric together in lots of ways that were charming and interesting and intoxicating to me. The perfect meal, or the best meals, occur in a context that frequently has very little to do with the food itself."
    I agree.

    Also, I'd like to point out that his original statement appears to imply that only carnivorous meals are fine food, when in fact a vegetarian diet can actually be much more varied and exotic, depending on the person.

  9. #59
    Rainy Day Woman MDP2525's Avatar
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    It can. Feel free to change my fillet/Steak-N-Shake burger example to grilled eggplant flatbread with red pepper with goat cheese/Chick-fil-a salad.
    ~luck favors the ready~


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  10. #60
    Order Now! pure_mercury's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MDP2525 View Post
    You said enjoying delicious food is a sign of intelligence and refinement. I hate when people say this about food. Food is sensory. It is hedonistic. It's an adventure. Let's not place a diploma in its hand and make it do calculus.
    Food is not just those things. No form of art is. There are sensual and intellectual aspects of food, paintings, music, film, anything creative. Appreciating things on an intellectual level does not equate to neglecting the visceral thrill of them. False dichotomy.


    In fine dining establishments people are paying for the quality of the atmosphere just as much as the food. I'm not saying the food isn't fantastic. It is. But I can enjoy a perfectly cooked fillet just as much as a Steak-N-Shake burger at 3 a.m. I may appreciate the fillet more but only because I don't have it as often. Doesn't make either one better or more refined than the other and it doesn't make me more or less intelligent that I can savor both. Anthony Bourdain said it better than I could:

    "Meals make the society, hold the fabric together in lots of ways that were charming and interesting and intoxicating to me. The perfect meal, or the best meals, occur in a context that frequently has very little to do with the food itself."
    I disagree about the fine dining establishments, too. The food, along with the company of your dining companions, is always the most important aspect of the dining experience. White truffle risotto from Le Cirque would still taste delicious in my apartment. Nice decor and excellent service are enhancements, but they can't make bad food into good food. People who pay through the nose to eat in the "hot" new place and don't care about the food aren't real food fans. I am not a food snob. The most enjoyable meal I've had since I moved to L.A. was probably the one outside of Palm Springs at some Mexican place in a strip mall. It just happened to be a particularly good authentic Mexican place, and my buddy and I ate and drank to our stomachs' content. They did a great job there. Was it the same as lunch at Le Bec-Fin or a sushi feast at Blowfish? No, but it was still great. It's always going to be about the food first for me.
    Who wants to try a bottle of merc's "Extroversion Olive Oil?"

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