User Tag List

First 45678 Last

Results 51 to 60 of 89

Thread: Food insurance

  1. #51
    Permabanned
    Join Date
    May 2009
    MBTI
    ISFP
    Enneagram
    6w7 sx
    Socionics
    SEE Fi
    Posts
    25,301

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lateralus View Post

    I don't know enough about medicine to know what would be involved in taking care of a chronically ill person, but they should probably pay directly...
    Oh my god you live in la la land.

  2. #52
    Senior Member Lateralus's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    MBTI
    ENTJ
    Enneagram
    3w4
    Posts
    6,276

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ptgatsby View Post
    Ahhh... now I get you. In that case, I do agree. Routine medical 'insurance' makes no sense at all and never has.
    Then why do people (outside of being uninformed) want that type of insurance expanded?
    "We grow up thinking that beliefs are something to be proud of, but they're really nothing but opinions one refuses to reconsider. Beliefs are easy. The stronger your beliefs are, the less open you are to growth and wisdom, because "strength of belief" is only the intensity with which you resist questioning yourself. As soon as you are proud of a belief, as soon as you think it adds something to who you are, then you've made it a part of your ego."

  3. #53
    Oberon
    Guest

    Default

    This thread is a hoot.

    It points out something that people seem to not understand about health care, which is this:

    Health care is provided by health care providers to consumers, i.e. you and me. Health care is paid for by the consumers, always. This payment can come directly or indirectly, through consumers grouped together as a body or on an individual basis, through private channels or public ones, but regardless of the route it takes, money flows from the consumer to the provider.

    Now take that system and add an insurance company to it. How can the insurance company do anything but add overhead to the process? So now take that system and add government to it. Just keeps getting better, doesn't it.

  4. #54
    Oberon
    Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by nozflubber View Post
    That's the capitalist way! (This is already done with Education. Private schools compete with public or they get closed off. It works)
    Yes, but in the case of schools it's very one-sided. Public schools that don't make the grade are almost never shut down for poor performance. It's only the private schools that are at risk.

  5. #55
    Permabanned
    Join Date
    May 2009
    MBTI
    ISFP
    Enneagram
    6w7 sx
    Socionics
    SEE Fi
    Posts
    25,301

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lateralus View Post
    Then why do people (outside of being uninformed) want that type of insurance expanded?
    Because lots of people can't afford healthcare otherwise. You almost have to live in an upper-middle class bubble, or just be someone who has never suffered from things like chronic allergies or mental illness, to not understand that medicine is DAMN expensive for people who have to get prescriptions filled every month. There are services like Planned Parenthood and the health clinic formed because medical care is otherwise so expensive. Some people can't afford to go to the dentist more than once every few years unless they have dental insurance.

    Either you're for insurance, or against it. To say that you only want catastrophic insurance is to admit that you don't know your own platform. And to want to interfere with the free trade of insurance is actually very liberal of you - not libertarian - which confuses me as to why you don't want any sort of government regulation. You're simultaneously arguing a liberal and a libertarian position (two very different positions economically speaking) and your metaphor doesn't work, either. May I remind you for the second time that we already have food insurance - it's called food stamps and WIC, and it works better than any preposterous "private food insurance" ever would.

    Your platform doesn't make any sense.
    \

  6. #56
    Oberon
    Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by marmalade.sunrise View Post
    Your platform doesn't make any sense.
    \
    Health care isn't inherently as expensive as current market conditions seem to indicate. The primary reason for the inflation of the cost of health care is the transition from direct payment for services to indirect payment for services.

    Health care providers discovered they were able to charge insurance companies higher prices than they could charge individual consumers. The insurance companies passed the costs along to the consumers in the form of higher premiums. Premiums were mostly paid by employers rather than individuals, so there was no general uproar.

    Generally speaking, that's why Tylenol at the hospital costs you five bucks per tablet.

    There are GPs out there who are going back to a cash model for family medicine. At sixty bucks an office visit and four dollars at the Wal-Mart pharmacy, people are finding that they can actually afford routine health care.

  7. #57
    Permabanned
    Join Date
    May 2009
    MBTI
    ISFP
    Enneagram
    6w7 sx
    Socionics
    SEE Fi
    Posts
    25,301

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by oberon View Post
    Health care isn't inherently as expensive as current market conditions seem to indicate. The primary reason for the inflation of the cost of health care is the transition from direct payment for services to indirect payment for services.

    Health care providers discovered they were able to charge insurance companies higher prices than they could charge individual consumers. The insurance companies passed the costs along to the consumers in the form of higher premiums. Premiums were mostly paid by employers rather than individuals, so there was no general uproar.

    Generally speaking, that's why Tylenol at the hospital costs you five bucks per tablet.

    There are GPs out there who are going back to a cash model for family medicine. At sixty bucks an office visit and four dollars at the Wal-Mart pharmacy, people are finding that they can actually afford routine health care.
    Many meds aren't available on the Wal Mart 4 bucks plan. I know, because one of the medicines I take is not. However, I am fortunately on a certain plan that only costs me $15 a month specifically for my particular on-going, chronic health need. My other regular maintenance needs are met by health care at the student center on campus.

    You still have to think in terms of all kinds of health problems, not just regular doctor's office visits.

    I'm not arguing that ending insurance wouldn't lower costs of health care (although how much it would actually lower it is debatable). It's just that doing so does not fit the ideal of "free enterprise" and would involve government intervention, which is part of what he's arguing against. That's what doesn't make any sense.

  8. #58
    Oberon
    Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by marmalade.sunrise View Post
    You still have to think in terms of all kinds of health problems, not just regular doctor's office visits.
    Well you see, that's what insurance is actually for. Event-related coverage.

  9. #59
    Permabanned
    Join Date
    May 2009
    MBTI
    ISFP
    Enneagram
    6w7 sx
    Socionics
    SEE Fi
    Posts
    25,301

    Default

    Event related coverage? Ok. But my point is what about people with arthritis, lupus, anxiety disorder, or clinical depression? Those don't count as either regular doctor's office visits or "events" particularly where psychiatric is concerned. And what about people with cancer and AIDS? Those treatments are expensive.

  10. #60
    Senior Member Lateralus's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    MBTI
    ENTJ
    Enneagram
    3w4
    Posts
    6,276

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by oberon View Post
    Well you see, that's what insurance is actually for. Event-related coverage.
    I'm surprised that some people in this thread don't understand the difference between catastrophic medical insurance (you're injured playing a sport and require surgery) and routine medical insurance (prenatal care, prescription drug plans, etc). One distributes risk, which is the purpose of insurance. The other doesn't. It only adds to the cost.
    "We grow up thinking that beliefs are something to be proud of, but they're really nothing but opinions one refuses to reconsider. Beliefs are easy. The stronger your beliefs are, the less open you are to growth and wisdom, because "strength of belief" is only the intensity with which you resist questioning yourself. As soon as you are proud of a belief, as soon as you think it adds something to who you are, then you've made it a part of your ego."

Similar Threads

  1. Avoiding Chinese food nearly impossible.
    By Athenian200 in forum Politics, History, and Current Events
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: 06-09-2011, 08:10 PM
  2. [SP] Improviser-Artisan-SP (Food For Thought)
    By "?" in forum The SP Arthouse (ESFP, ISFP, ESTP, ISTP)
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 06-09-2011, 10:51 AM
  3. Holiday Food
    By Randomnity in forum Home, Garden and Nature
    Replies: 27
    Last Post: 01-05-2010, 10:08 PM
  4. Interesting Food and Health Blog
    By reason in forum Health and Fitness
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 02-06-2008, 12:19 AM
  5. Pot Pies: Food of the Gods?
    By Ivy in forum Home, Garden and Nature
    Replies: 43
    Last Post: 08-13-2007, 12:11 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO