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  1. #241
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ivy View Post
    It absolutely is. Mine were both on the small side but a friend of mine (who, by the way, is a 100-lb vegetarian) apparently put out melted butter. Her babies got BIG in the first six or eight months when they were on 100% breastmilk, but leaned out when they started crawling and are now totally normal sized elementary-aged children. That's a very common pattern for breastfed babies. They don't ALL do that, but many do, so just because juggernaut's kids didn't grow in that pattern doesn't make it abnormal or the result of a bad diet. The macronutrient ratio of breastmilk is pretty much static-- it doesn't change based on the mother's diet unless she is severely undernourished.
    Did you happen to look at the pic in question? That wasn't a "chunky" baby. That was an obese tot. None of my boys were skinny as babies, two of the three were actually over 25 lbs by their first bdays (which is at or over the 90th percentile). The "baby" in that picture would clearly be incapable of performing the most basic physical activities appropriate for his age. Nobody is expecting a baby to be skinny, and I would find it quite alarming if he was, but rotund to the point that it causes what should be an able-bodied toddler to be compromised in his ability to do normal things isn't healthy.

  2. #242
    Strongly Ambivalent Ivy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by juggernaut View Post
    Did you happen to look at the pic in question? That wasn't a "chunky" baby. That was an obese tot. None of my boys were skinny as babies, two of the three were actually over 25 lbs by their first bdays (which is at or over the 90th percentile). The "baby" in that picture would clearly be incapable of performing the most basic physical activities appropriate for his age. Nobody is expecting a baby to be skinny, and I would find it quite alarming if he was, but rotund to the point that it causes what should be an able-bodied toddler to be compromised in his ability to do normal things isn't healthy.
    Perhaps not, but it's not because of his mother's diet. Breast milk macronutrient composition is fairly constant regardless of the mother's diet unless she is significantly undernourished, but the converse doesn't happen. Overnourished mothers don't produce over-fatty breastmilk.

    [edit: I was imprecise; the macronutrient composition is fairly constant including the differences between foremilk & hindmilk, and those between newborn milk & mature milk. The differences are pretty constant as well.]
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  3. #243
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    I didn't say it was his mother's breast milk, someone else claimed that it could be a chunky breastfed baby. I simply responded by saying that if it was, then the mother needed to check her diet (slight sarcasm was the intention). I've never seen a solely breastfed baby in that condition. Breastfed babies are often chubbier as babies, but by the time they're the age of that little boy they've generally begun to slim down a bit...as you very astutely pointed out.

    You can see for yourself, my son was hardly skinny (check out the thighs).


  4. #244
    Strongly Ambivalent Ivy's Avatar
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    I've never seen one that was THAT big, but I've seen breastfed babies who were 25+lbs at 6 months. Amazingly enough they managed to grow into normal-sized children.
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    Strongly Ambivalent Ivy's Avatar
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    By the way, that baby in that photo was 8 months old when he made the news in 2007. I haven't been able to find any updates about him so it's entirely possible that he DID lean out a bit as he started eating solids and moving more, as often happens.
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  6. #246
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    I think the one in the pic (my youngest) was close to 25 lbs at 6 mos., but he started walking at nine and his weight gain leveled off almost immediately. I don't think it hurt that he has two older brothers in my house and four older siblings in his dads' (he has two dads) that he's been trying to chase down since he was born. That basically brings us back to the beginning of the discussion. Taking care of our children with proper diet and encouraging them to be active so they have the opportunity to grow into healthy adults is our responsibility.

  7. #247
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ivy View Post
    By the way, that baby in that photo was 8 months old when he made the news in 2007. I haven't been able to find any updates about him so it's entirely possible that he DID lean out a bit as he started eating solids and moving more, as often happens.
    Then there is definitely something wrong. My guess is that was/is NOT a solely breastfed baby. If he was, then there may well be some sort of metabolic issue going on.

  8. #248
    Strongly Ambivalent Ivy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by juggernaut View Post
    Then there is definitely something wrong. My guess is that was/is NOT a solely breastfed baby. If he was, then there may well be some sort of metabolic issue going on.
    For that baby, I agree. The news stories said that he was always hungry and nursed as often as 20 times a day, although so did mine and they were never even half that big until they were well over a year old. (We were even told to "push butter" on our son-- I pushed avocados instead.) So I'd say probably something weird and metabolic is going on with that baby.

    And as has been mentioned, you never know what's going on in reality. Back when I was doing peer counseling with nursing moms I was always dismayed to hear that they were giving 5 month old babies french fries and stuff like that. And that's just what they would admit to.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ivy View Post
    And as has been mentioned, you never know what's going on in reality. Back when I was doing peer counseling with nursing moms I was always dismayed to hear that they were giving 5 month old babies french fries and stuff like that. And that's just what they would admit to.
    Good lord! That is pretty terrible.
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  10. #250
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    Quote Originally Posted by 01011010 View Post
    Some individuals want proof that the majority of obese people don't really eat healthy, and forgo regular exercise. Apparently, obese people became that way solely due to metabolism. Excess consumption and lack of activity had nothing to do with it. The obese eat healthy and within a normal range. Exercise frequently and consistently. Yet, they still can't lose weight.

    Dear Nightning, how can that be?
    Proof that majority of obese people don't eat a balanced diet nor exercise is not necessary. The whole issue of weight is an effect and not the cause of disease.

    I forgotten who pointed out large body size means the heart has to work harder... you know what's the fastest way of decreasing cardiac load? Give them a diuretic. Pee all the water out. You'll lose weight. Does that mean your risk for heart failure goes down? Only temporary. What's more effective is to train the remaining heart cells to handle the load and to prevent the arteries from clogging up further. So very mild exercise such as walking and diet control. On top of that you take drugs to prevent overactivation of the sympathetic drive. Weight simply isn't a major factor. It's a side effect often associated with poor diet and lack of exercise (besides the genetic predisposition of a selected group).

    It's like saying because you're bald... you're old. Does baldness cause aging? Clearly not... That is what I meant... Not that most obese people don't exercise or choose a poor diet.

    As to genetic predisposition. Everybody has a setpoint for their weight. Mine just so happens to be very low. Which means I can stuff myself and not exercise and still be "under weight". Correspondingly you get people with high setpoints. So their weight hovers around that value no matter how much they exercise or watch their caloric intake. That said, your weight is suppose to be near that setpoint. This is the weight your body feels right. For people who are far away from their setpoint though... that poses serious health problems. Essentially it means your body cannot maintain homeostasis... you're completely out of whack.
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