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  1. #11
    Intriguing.... Quinlan's Avatar
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    High fat, high carb food is cheap, abundant and convenient. Time to spend exercising and feeding kids is scarce outside of work. Simple really.

    Funny to see the intuitives here pointing the finger at the individual parents, rather than seeing it as a macro (economic and social) issue.
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  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Qre:us View Post
    One of the first challenges in combating obesity is prevention (obviously). And, with that comes accurate assessment of risk-factors (a huge one being Type II diabetes), and, changes that's within the federal and state governments' mandates to be targetted with a driven focus. Such as school lunch programs, eradicating soft drinks/chips from vending machine for primary aged kids, and a whole host of primary prevention that seems to be lagging behind while the waistband expands.
    What happens when the kids don't have that at home? I'm reaching here, but I assume obese children come from an overweight household to begin with.

  3. #13
    Was E.laur Laurie's Avatar
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    The kids I see aren't that overweight. My daughter is 4 years old and in preschool. I can't think of one of the 25 kids that is obese or even overweight.

    I think it's crap.

  4. #14
    ^He pronks, too! Magic Poriferan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Quinlan View Post
    High fat, high carb food is cheap, abundant and convenient. Time to spend exercising and feeding kids is scarce outside of work. Simple really.

    Funny to see the intuitives here pointing the finger at the individual parents, rather than seeing it as a macro (economic and social) issue.
    While you are right about that, I did have very poor, busy parents, and was never once close to obese. So society pushes people in that direction, but parents do have a fair amount of control and therefore responsibility in this situation.
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  5. #15
    Senior Member professor goodstain's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 01011010 View Post
    What happens when the kids don't have that at home? I'm reaching here, but I assume obese children come from an overweight household to begin with.
    That goes without saying. A sensor said it best. Find a way to make the good stuff more convenient and abundant. That would help both the parent and kid. Next thing you know-you'll see diabetes kit vending machines.
    everyone uses every function about evenly. take NE for example. if there are those who don't use it much, then why are there such massive amounts of people constantly flowing through Wallmart with 20 items or less?

  6. #16
    Senior Member Qre:us's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 01011010 View Post
    What happens when the kids don't have that at home? I'm reaching here, but I assume obese children come from an overweight household to begin with.
    Usually, at the level of public policy, what can be accessed or reached, should be targeted with vehemence if we're talking of primary prevention. Private arenas, like homes, will have a variety/host of factors that will make it not easy to target, and obviously, not easy to apply a policy level intervention. Thus, the most common sense place would be to reach these kids, in masses. And, schools/daycares provide a good opportunity if we assume, that on average, they spend, around 6-8hrs of their lives/day there. That's a huge start, at the level of public policy (and I don't know how sure this is, but, I have been hearing about cutbacks to PE classes/programs - which is another doom).

    Will the effect be nullified by what is practiced at home? Very well may be, but, perhaps, an education campaigns for parents could be a start. There will never be a 1-stop solution to such complex socio-economic health problems. We will have some kids falling through the cracks (and unfortunately, most of these will be from low SES).......

    The only thing we can do is start to target the most obvious areas, that's most likely to reach the masses - and again, schools and daycares, and prenatal care for mothers (along with education about nutrition, and accessibility to nutritional food at affordable prices) would be one of the easiest start at the public policy level. As, governments can't (yet)enter private homes to start mandates.

  7. #17
    I'm a star. Kangirl's Avatar
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    This appears, from my experience, an unpopular and often disagreed with opinion, but I don't believe there is an 'obesity crisis'. To be more specific, I think the health risks of obesity have been wildly exaggerated.

    Now, would I rather have a non-obese child? Yes. But only because of the social pressures on the obese and the assumed physical limits being obese places on a person, not because I think obesity is some ticket to terrible lifetime health.

    I just don't have a problem with obese people. Do I think it looks attractive? No. But I also don't think it's any of my business what someone else eats/weighs, nor do I think it's the government's business.
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  8. #18
    Senior Member Qre:us's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elaur View Post
    The kids I see aren't that overweight. My daughter is 4 years old and in preschool. I can't think of one of the 25 kids that is obese or even overweight.

    I think it's crap.
    This is why there's epidemiology, so that such anecdotal crap can be trashed in the bin.

  9. #19
    Was E.laur Laurie's Avatar
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    Oh, don't get me wrong, I see the overweight adults. And I see it more at the elementary schools. But I haven't seen it in the preschool aged children.

  10. #20
    Senior Member ptgatsby's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nightning View Post
    It makes very little sense when you can have ~20% of the kids be over the 95th percentile.
    That really makes me wonder about the article or the research...

    However, I'm pretty sure they mean that the government has their own measurements based on previous sampling... which is then used as a baseline. So, they are considered obese when they are over the BMI of the baseline's top 5%.

    Which is a serious shift, but arbitrary historical standards, questionable models and poor measuring systems (BMI, bleh) are pretty discouraging to see. Having said that, it's still apples to apples. The trend is pretty clear.

    Sedatory life styles? Kids sitting in front of the computer or playing video games rather than playing sports etc outside? And parents are too busy making a living to spend quality time with their kids?
    Hey, I'll have you know that I went for a walk with my mom yesterday, TYVM!

    Jokes aside, do you think the 20-40 generation is much better, really? I think kids get more exercise than their parents. It's the diet, mostly, IMO. That's more taught.

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