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  1. #111
    Intriguing.... Quinlan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 01011010 View Post
    You think obese people don't know they can walk a bit more, or just exercise in general?
    No, I mean why the obsession with fat, rather than fitness and overall health?
    Act your age not your enneagram number.

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  2. #112
    your resident asshole
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ivy View Post
    I agree, DisneyGeek. We had to seek out a school for our daughter that didn't have kids sitting at desks for hours at a time and had a sacrosanct hour-long recess period in the middle of the day.

    Incidentally, I'm more worried about handing down the emotional baggage I've built up over years of being overweight and ending up with an anorexic kid than handing down bad eating habits and ending up with a fat kid.
    At my brother's elementary school, they used to have 2 recesses a day that were about a half-hour long. Now, they just have one recess and the second one if the students behave well enough and the teacher decides to let them. Does the school think this is helping my overweight little brother get more exercise?

    Heh, just needed a mini-rant there. =P

  3. #113
    Strongly Ambivalent Ivy's Avatar
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    That always floors me. Let's punish antsy little kids by making them sit for even longer! That will... make them... less.. antsy..?
    The one who buggers a fire burns his penis
    -anonymous graffiti in the basilica at Pompeii

  4. #114
    your resident asshole
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    Hahaha.

  5. #115
    your resident asshole
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    Quote Originally Posted by Quinlan View Post
    No, I mean why the obsession with fat, rather than fitness and overall health?
    Because he enjoys negativity? =/

  6. #116
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    Quote Originally Posted by heart View Post
    Why do you assume that obese people don't exercise? The 250 pound woman that I know was active, walking, dancing, housework, traveled. She's not too active now, she's into her eighties, but for thirty years she was as active as I am, at times more so.
    The majority doesn't. Period.


    Quote Originally Posted by Haphazard View Post
    I come from a very fat family. They still do things about it, but nonetheless, we're still very fat.

    I think there's a difference between just being fat and being fat enough for financial support the way you're talking. My family works very hard, and they don't receive benefits like that. Is this about being obese, or being a drain on society? They're two different things.
    My answer was in regards to a comment stating, obese people aren't nice to look at, but they cause no direct problems to other people. The truth is many of them draw disability with no other health issues. That seems like supporting addictions, which is a waste of tax money.

    As for obesity itself, I don't care what adults choose to do with their own bodies. As long as they aren't asking society to support them, or push unhealthy habits on children that depend on them for survival.

    Genetics can definitely play a role in being overweight. Medically obese is another story. There are exceptions, but very rarely. I've completed two genetics internships. I feel certain that's the truth.


    Quote Originally Posted by DisneyGeek View Post
    Obesity is the problem. Diet and fitness is the solution. Now, would you rather rant negatively about something or approach it in a helpful way?
    Quote Originally Posted by Quinlan View Post
    No, I mean why the obsession with fat, rather than fitness and overall health?
    Many of them make excuses about not being able to exercise, or afford better food. It's not like eating less and working out is a secret privy to only a few individuals. If they don't make use of the options available to them, it's their own fault.

  7. #117
    heart on fire
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    Quote Originally Posted by 01011010 View Post
    The truth is many of them draw disability with no other health issues. That seems like supporting addictions, which is a waste of tax money.
    Proof? Disablity is HARD to obtain.

  8. #118
    your resident asshole
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    Quote Originally Posted by 01011010 View Post
    Many of them make excuses about not being able to exercise, or afford better food. It's not like eating less and working out is a secret privy to only a few individuals. If they don't make use of the options available to them, it's their own fault.
    Since when does many imply all? All you're doing is stereotyping.


    And again, how is this a solution to the problem?

  9. #119
    Intriguing.... Quinlan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 01011010 View Post
    The majority doesn't. Period.
    How do you measure that?

    Many of them make excuses about not being able to exercise, or afford better food. It's not like eating less and working out is a secret privy to only a few individuals. If they don't make use of the options available to them, it's their own fault.
    But a skinny person can make the same excuses and be an equally unhealthy burden on society, but lucky for them they don't receive the same abuse and angst that obese people do, in fact they get praised for their ability to keep weight off and still maintain that lifestyle.

    Perhaps you see thinner people as more aesthetically pleasing and therefore are more accepting of them?
    Act your age not your enneagram number.

    Quinlan's Creations

  10. #120
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    Quote Originally Posted by heart View Post
    Proof? Disablity is HARD to obtain.
    Quote Originally Posted by DisneyGeek View Post
    Since when does many imply all? All you're doing is stereotyping.
    Quote Originally Posted by Quinlan View Post
    How do you measure that?
    Empirical evidence.



    The Reality


    • Unhealthy diet and physical inactivity can contribute to or aggravate many chronic diseases and conditions, including type 2 diabetes, hypertension, heart disease, stroke, and some cancers.
    • During the past 20 years, obesity rates among adults have risen significantly in the United States. In 2005–2006, data from the National Center for Health Statistics show that 34% of U.S. adults 20 years of age and older—over 72 million people—are obese.
    • In 2005, few adults met the Healthy People 2010 objectives for fruit and vegetable consumption; only 33% consumed fruit two or more times per day and even fewer (27%) consumed vegetables three or more times per day.
    • Despite the proven benefits of physical activity, less than half of American adults in 2007 engaged in enough physical activity to provide health benefits.
    • More than a quarter of children born in 2004 were never breastfed.
    • The percentage of young people who are obese has approximately tripled since 1980. In 2003–2006, 16.3% of children and adolescents aged 2–19 years had a body mass index greater than or equal to the 95th percentile for age and sex on the CDC growth charts.
    • Over one third (34%) of adolescents in grades 9–12 had a soft drink (not diet) at least one time per day during the previous 7 days.
    • In 2007, 65% of young people in grades 9–12 did not get the recommended amount of physical activity; 35% watched television for 3 or more hours on the average school day.

    The Cost of Obesity and Chronic Diseases


    • Among children and adolescents, annual hospital costs related to obesity were $127 million during 1997–1999 up from $35 million during 1979–1981.
    • In 2000, the total cost of obesity in the United States was estimated to be $117 billion—$61 billion for direct medical costs and $56 billion for indirect costs.
    • In 1996, $31 billion of treatment costs (in year 2000 dollars) for cardiovascular disease among adults was related to overweight and obesity.
    Chronic Disease - Preventing Obesity and Chronic Diseases Through Good Nutrition and Physical Activity



    Social Security Disability
    If you are obese, you may be entitled to disability payments from the Social Security Administration (SSA). According to the SSA, $77 million are paid monthly to approximately 137,000 persons who met obesity requirements for disability under criteria used prior to May 15, 2000, when a new policy was issued. Most of the people who qualified for benefits under the old policy claimed to have muscle or skeletal complications.
    American Obesity Association - Disability Due to Obesity

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