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View Poll Results: What do you think of exercising 'eye for an eye' retribution?

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45. You may not vote on this poll
  • 'Eye for an eye' is as ancient as it is just.

    19 42.22%
  • I'm with Gandhi on this; 'an eye for an eye will make the whole world blind!"

    20 44.44%
  • Well... <insert commentary via post>

    6 13.33%
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  1. #51
    I'm a star. Kangirl's Avatar
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    I object to the death penalty and object to this for the same reason - it's barbaric and it's not something a healthy society should be dishing out. So, yes, I strongly oppose the blinding of this man. (a large part of my opposition to punishments like this is that a)they're irreversible and b)the justice system, of any country, is never 100% right - I cannot accept the risk of punishing the innocent)

    However, I completely understand the feelings of the woman this happened to, and feel that she deserves compassion, as does her position. How would you feel if this had happened to you? Your sister?

    Also re: retribution - this is human, I don't see why she's being derided for it. Retribution, whether people feel comfortable admitting it or not, often plays a part in the death penalty in the US.

    Do I think retribution should be a part of the legal system? No. Do I understand that wishing for it is entirely natural and human? Yes.

    In my perfect world, this man would spend the rest of his life in a non-too-comfortable prison. Violent crimes are, imo, not punished harshly enough (although I'm mostly talking about the west here, not the middle east!).
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  2. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by kyuuei View Post
    See, I'm not arguing based on what I believe and what I would do. Merely if this is a right decision for her. She's not in America, and she's not me. She's a blind Iranian woman in Iran.

    In the United States it's all or nothing. We don't take parts. Slap on the ass or all your life, there seems to be little compromise. If it's not a fine, it's lots of jail... and if it's not both of those, it's death.

    A harsh punishment is a harsh punishment.. Some people think that the death penalty is harsh and unjust. But the fact remains that is within the law, and it is our right to call for it as a means of justice. I think taking the eyes, with the point's I've made, is a fit decision.. not one made by a deranged angry woman.
    I don't think anyone is denying its legality in Iran. I think the points people are making against the decision are that because it is legal does not make it moral and does not make it effective at achieving any of the woman's desires.

    Evidence shows it won't prevent crimes, the same way evidence shows spanking children doesn't prevent misbehaving. In all probability there will simply be two blind people instead of one.

    It's a common view that the man is in jail only because he is a high risk. This view states that if there was proof he would not commit another crime in his life, he would not be imprisoned. This is what the human right's activists are arguing for, I think. Hence why they see the punishment as unnecessary and as bad as the original crime.

    The idea I was questioning was that it is possible to follow "an eye for an eye" correctly, which no one seems to have picked up on.

  3. #53
    Emperor/Dictator kyuuei's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kangirl View Post
    I object to the death penalty and object to this for the same reason - it's barbaric and it's not something a healthy society should be dishing out. So, yes, I strongly oppose the blinding of this man. (a large part of my opposition to punishments like this is that a)they're irreversible and b)the justice system, of any country, is never 100% right - I cannot accept the risk of punishing the innocent)

    However, I completely understand the feelings of the woman this happened to, and feel that she deserves compassion, as does her position. How would you feel if this had happened to you? Your sister?

    Also re: retribution - this is human, I don't see why she's being derided for it. Retribution, whether people feel comfortable admitting it or not, often plays a part in the death penalty in the US.

    Do I think retribution should be a part of the legal system? No. Do I understand that wishing for it is entirely natural and human? Yes.

    In my perfect world, this man would spend the rest of his life in a non-too-comfortable prison. Violent crimes are, imo, not punished harshly enough (although I'm mostly talking about the west here, not the middle east!).
    Precisely why I think this is invalid. This is A. Not a healthy society in any sense of the word. B. This man is 100% guilty, there's no room for error as to whether he did this or not. She identified him, and he confessed. C. retribution is hardly all that plays into this. You've been blinded by a man who is scorned by you when you've done hardly anything to him. He's just spent three years in prison, and risked losing his eyes to your initial decision which you revoke out of compassion. Then he has to give YOU hundreds of dollars to repay things that he created. He's not sound of mind or body. Do you want to risk walking around, blind, on the streets with an angry person like that out on them as well, fully healthy and capable of following you down a dark alleyway one night? .. I certainly don't.
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  4. #54
    Emperor/Dictator kyuuei's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by erm View Post
    I don't think anyone is denying its legality in Iran. I think the points people are making against the decision are that because it is legal does not make it moral and does not make it effective at achieving any of the woman's desires.

    Evidence shows it won't prevent crimes, the same way evidence shows spanking children doesn't prevent misbehaving. In all probability there will simply be two blind people instead of one.

    It's a common view that the man is in jail only because he is a high risk. This view states that if there was proof he would not commit another crime in his life, he would not be imprisoned. This is what the human right's activists are arguing for, I think. Hence why they see the punishment as unnecessary and as bad as the original crime.

    The argument I was making (the idea I was questioning) was that it is impossible to follow "an eye for an eye" correctly, which no one seems to have picked up on.
    I understand the points made. I wouldn't make this decision if I were the girl.. I would take the money, pay off debts, and skip town for a place cozier and safer-feeling. But I won't be one to speculate on her motivations for why, maybe retribution IS her motivation. If this is the case, than she will feel better. There ARE people that genuinely feel relieved at revenge. I know, personally, I've had situations where sexual attempts have been unwelcomed.. I've punched them, and moved on. No lingering emotions, I called it even with two unpleasent experiences.

    There's plenty of people against the decision, I offer reasons defending it. There's two sides to every story. Evidence shows that spanking your kid doesn't stop misbehaving. I give you proof it does: I am alive today. I've told this story before how I was a dumbass and thought playing near the sinkhole was cool.. Till I fell in one day and nearly died as a result. I didn't understand any of this. I did understand when I went over there, my ass got beat for it, and I didn't want to feel that pain so I avoided it.

    There's two sides to every coin, and for every person that says something doesn't work, there will be another saying it absolutely does. In the end though, the question is "Do you think this is right?" and for her, in her circumstances.. having seen the way it is over there. Yes. I do.

    And yes Anja I find myself quite passionate about it even though I'm arguing against the decision I myself would make.
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  5. #55
    Senior Member Lookin4theBestNU's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by erm
    The idea I was questioning was that it is possible to follow "an eye for an eye" correctly, which no one seems to have picked up on.
    No, it's not perfect eye for an eye. She didn't ask for him to have his face burned and mutilated along with the blindness she received. I think in this case close enough is good enough.
    "At points of clarity, I realize that my life on earth is meaningless, and that I am merely a pawn in a bigger game. A game I cannot possibly understand or have control of. Thankfully, before depression sets in, I drift back into my cloudy, bewildered daily routine." **Joel Patrick Warneke**

  6. #56
    pathwise dependent FDG's Avatar
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    I think it's crazy. I accept it if it's istantaenous: somebody tries to hurt/kill/steal from somebody else, and the victim or somebody that is around hurts badly/kills the other guy. But done in a conscious way, it's crazy. It would have been "okay" if just right after the fact the woman striked the guy to the eyes making him blind.
    ENTj 7-3-8 sx/sp

  7. #57
    unscannable Tigerlily's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FDG View Post
    I think it's crazy. I accept it if it's istantaenous: somebody tries to hurt/kill/steal from somebody else, and the victim or somebody that is around hurts badly/kills the other guy. But done in a conscious way, it's crazy. It would have been "okay" if just right after the fact the woman striked the guy to the eyes making him blind.
    so is her appearance now. it's bat shit crazy.
    Time is a delicate mistress.

  8. #58
    Senior Member Lateralus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FDG View Post
    I think it's crazy. I accept it if it's istantaenous: somebody tries to hurt/kill/steal from somebody else, and the victim or somebody that is around hurts badly/kills the other guy. But done in a conscious way, it's crazy. It would have been "okay" if just right after the fact the woman striked the guy to the eyes making him blind.
    Define crazy, because I'm thinking we have wildly different definitions for the term based on your post.
    "We grow up thinking that beliefs are something to be proud of, but they're really nothing but opinions one refuses to reconsider. Beliefs are easy. The stronger your beliefs are, the less open you are to growth and wisdom, because "strength of belief" is only the intensity with which you resist questioning yourself. As soon as you are proud of a belief, as soon as you think it adds something to who you are, then you've made it a part of your ego."

  9. #59
    pathwise dependent FDG's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lateralus View Post
    Define crazy, because I'm thinking we have wildly different definitions for the term based on your post.
    Oh c'mon, how do you "define" crazy? Even worse, not as a technical illness, but as a qualifier as I used it in my sentence?
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  10. #60
    pathwise dependent FDG's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jen View Post
    so is her appearance now. it's bat shit crazy.
    What do you mean?
    ENTj 7-3-8 sx/sp

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