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  1. #1
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    Default Newsweek says "we are all now socialists"

    Not that I agree with that, since I am vehemently against it, as is a fair portion/majority of the GENERAL PUBLIC.

    We Are All Socialists Now | Newsweek Business | Newsweek.com

    The interview was nearly over. on the Fox News Channel last Wednesday evening, Sean Hannity was coming to the end of a segment with Indiana Congressman Mike Pence, the chair of the House Republican Conference and a vociferous foe of President Obama's nearly $1 trillion stimulus bill. How, Pence had asked rhetorically, was $50 million for the National Endowment for the Arts going to put people back to work in Indiana? How would $20 million for "fish passage barriers" (a provision to pay for the removal of barriers in rivers and streams so that fish could migrate freely) help create jobs? Hannity could not have agreed more. "It is … the European Socialist Act of 2009," the host said, signing off. "We're counting on you to stop it. Thank you, congressman."

    There it was, just before the commercial: the S word, a favorite among conservatives since John McCain began using it during the presidential campaign. (Remember Joe the Plumber? Sadly, so do we.) But it seems strangely beside the point. The U.S. government has already—under a conservative Republican administration—effectively nationalized the banking and mortgage industries. That seems a stronger sign of socialism than $50 million for art. Whether we want to admit it or not—and many, especially Congressman Pence and Hannity, do not—the America of 2009 is moving toward a modern European state.

    We remain a center-right nation in many ways—particularly culturally, and our instinct, once the crisis passes, will be to try to revert to a more free-market style of capitalism—but it was, again, under a conservative GOP administration that we enacted the largest expansion of the welfare state in 30 years: prescription drugs for the elderly. People on the right and the left want government to invest in alternative energies in order to break our addiction to foreign oil. And it is unlikely that even the reddest of states will decline federal money for infrastructural improvements.

    If we fail to acknowledge the reality of the growing role of government in the economy, insisting instead on fighting 21st-century wars with 20th-century terms and tactics, then we are doomed to a fractious and unedifying debate. The sooner we understand where we truly stand, the sooner we can think more clearly about how to use government in today's world.

    As the Obama administration presses the largest fiscal bill in American history, caps the salaries of executives at institutions receiving federal aid at $500,000 and introduces a new plan to rescue the banking industry, the unemployment rate is at its highest in 16 years. The Dow has slumped to 1998 levels, and last year mortgage foreclosures rose 81 percent.

    All of this is unfolding in an economy that can no longer be understood, even in passing, as the Great Society vs. the Gipper. Whether we like it or not—or even whether many people have thought much about it or not—the numbers clearly suggest that we are headed in a more European direction. A decade ago U.S. government spending was 34.3 percent of GDP, compared with 48.2 percent in the euro zone—a roughly 14-point gap, according to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. In 2010 U.S. spending is expected to be 39.9 percent of GDP, compared with 47.1 percent in the euro zone—a gap of less than 8 points. As entitlement spending rises over the next decade, we will become even more French.

    ---------------------------

    This is not to say that berets will be all the rage this spring, or that Obama has promised a croissant in every toaster oven. But the simple fact of the matter is that the political conversation, which shifts from time to time, has shifted anew, and for the foreseeable future Americans will be more engaged with questions about how to manage a mixed economy than about whether we should have one.

    The architect of this new era of big government? History has a sense of humor, for the man who laid the foundations for the world Obama now rules is George W. Bush, who moved to bail out the financial sector last autumn with $700 billion.

    Bush brought the Age of Reagan to a close; now Obama has gone further, reversing Bill Clinton's end of big government. The story, as always, is complicated. Polls show that Americans don't trust government and still don't want big government. They do, however, want what government delivers, like health care and national defense and, now, protections from banking and housing failure. During the roughly three decades since Reagan made big government the enemy and "liberal" an epithet, government did not shrink. It grew. But the economy grew just as fast, so government as a percentage of GDP remained about the same. Much of that economic growth was real, but for the past five years or so, it has borne a suspicious resemblance to Bernie Madoff's stock fund. Americans have been living high on borrowed money (the savings rate dropped from 7.6 percent in 1992 to less than zero in 2005) while financiers built castles in the air.

    Now comes the reckoning. The answer may indeed be more government. In the short run, since neither consumers nor business is likely to do it, the government will have to stimulate the economy. And in the long run, an aging population and global warming and higher energy costs will demand more government taxing and spending. The catch is that more government intrusion in the economy will almost surely limit growth (as it has in Europe, where a big welfare state has caused chronic high unemployment). Growth has always been America's birthright and saving grace.

    The Obama administration is caught in a paradox. It must borrow and spend to fix a crisis created by too much borrowing and spending. Having pumped the economy up with a stimulus, the president will have to cut the growth of entitlement spending by holding down health care and retirement costs and still invest in ways that will produce long-term growth. Obama talks of the need for smart government. To get the balance between America and France right, the new president will need all the smarts he can summon.


  2. #2
    Senior Member Maabus1999's Avatar
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    We are not socialist in a sense. We are Entitleists.

    And that is worse....

  3. #3
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    It's not socialism. It's welfare for the rich.

  4. #4
    Habitual Fi LineStepper JocktheMotie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Not_Me View Post
    It's not socialism. It's welfare for the rich.
    About damn time! Those poor and homeless have had a monopoly on welfare for quite some time now. It's only fair that this completely essential and awesome social service be extended to us as well. Now excuse me while I shine my monocle.



  5. #5
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    Check out this press conference from yesturday. One guy gets up and starts having an Obamagasm, then asks wth Obama can do to give more benefits to Mcdonalds workers like him. Then another woman gets up who is living in her car and is very poor. she tells her story, and then Obama tellers her to go backstage. They gave the woman a freaking house :/. I'm glad she will no longer be living in a car, but damn man. these people go to Obama and the government as if they're our saviors or something. This is very scary shit.

    [youtube="cIVsozvbG_w"]Woman gets free house from Obama[/youtube]

    [youtube="TptsP4ryido"]Mcdonalds Obamagasm[/youtube]

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by JocktheMotie View Post
    About damn time! Those poor and homeless have had a monopoly on welfare for quite some time now. It's only fair that this completely essential and awesome social service be extended to us as well. Now excuse me while I shine my monocle.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by 01011010 View Post
    Quite so, quite so. I have to go over my own top hat with a lint brush.

    A good butler is so difficult to find these days... I've had to have my driver do double-duty on occasion, and he's just no good at brushing hats.

  8. #8
    ^He pronks, too! Magic Poriferan's Avatar
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    I don't believe many academics that study socialism would say our current situation is socialist. It certainly isn't to my understanding.

    This is just what happens when America has to buy-up banks and crap. Americans don't know what to make of it. To any more socialist country, it should appear laughable to call the USA socialist, but Americans are kind of handling it like a drug they've never taken before. They are severely over-reacting while the experienced people laugh at their response to the low dosage.
    Go to sleep, iguana.


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  9. #9
    Queen hunter Virtual ghost's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Magic Poriferan View Post
    I don't believe many academics that study socialism would say our current situation is socialist. It certainly isn't to my understanding.

    This is just what happens when America has to buy-up banks and crap. Americans don't know what to make of it. To any more socialist country, it should appear laughable to call the USA socialist, but Americans are kind of handling it like a drug they've never taken before. They are severely over-reacting while the experienced people laugh at their response to the low dosage.
    That is what I was thinking since I am from country that is more socialistic.

    For some reason I think that the biggest problem here is that Americans
    (in general) are too easy to impress (get excited).

  10. #10
    Senior Member Lateralus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Risen View Post
    Check out this press conference from yesturday. One guy gets up and starts having an Obamagasm, then asks wth Obama can do to give more benefits to Mcdonalds workers like him. Then another woman gets up who is living in her car and is very poor. she tells her story, and then Obama tellers her to go backstage. They gave the woman a freaking house :/. I'm glad she will no longer be living in a car, but damn man. these people go to Obama and the government as if they're our saviors or something. This is very scary shit.
    That house had better given with someone's personal money. Who the hell does he think he is? Oprah?
    "We grow up thinking that beliefs are something to be proud of, but they're really nothing but opinions one refuses to reconsider. Beliefs are easy. The stronger your beliefs are, the less open you are to growth and wisdom, because "strength of belief" is only the intensity with which you resist questioning yourself. As soon as you are proud of a belief, as soon as you think it adds something to who you are, then you've made it a part of your ego."

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