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  1. #11
    Senior Member Accept's Avatar
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    The rise appears to be closely related to a rise in the civilian suicide rates, and even the Army, with the highest per 100,000 rate, is slightly lower than civil rate once the statistics are age adjusted. The adjustment is necessary as the civilian rate includes age groups far less likely to commit suicide, those groups not being well represented in the military (the military has a low average age when compared to the rest of society.) The percentages are too close to indicate the military is much safer or at greater risk.

    Civilian rates have gone up and down over the years. The Army rates haven't been tracked as long, but appear to match the recent trend upward.

    If there's a tragedy for the military, it is how the estimates suggest 65-70% of suicides are relationship related. The "Dear John" problem seems to be taking a heavier toll on soldiers than in the past. It's difficult to prepare a soldier for the possibility since they assume it won't happen to them, right up to the time when it finally does, at which point they aren't prepared to cope with the loss, and unlike their civilian counterpart, aren't there to argue the point face-to-face - aside from the fact that it's their absence which is often the cause of the breakup.

    I'm basing this on the young male soldier as the stats for females seems a bit harder to check patterns - women are far more likely to attempt suicide, yet men are more likely to succeed as they tend to use instantly fatal methods.
    “Naked to unknown forces, fortune evades mere understanding. The trial of effort.
    The dream of change. Such a place might Hell be to thought and action.”
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  2. #12
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    This could be some of the reasons.


    First you are on the another side of the world fighting a war is and you can't see the end of it. You are sent there mostly because someone feelt like it.
    If are doing this because you love your country and you family you can't be happy. Since your country is falling apart and family you plan to support with you work is not doing so well because of the economy thing.
    Plus the rest of the world sees you as a war criminal of some sort.


    As a US Soldier you are losing all battles right now.

  3. #13
    Senior Member Anja's Avatar
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    Thanks for the thoughts. Please keep them coming.

    I haven't taken time to research whether suicide rates were kept during WWII but the people who went to fight were in for the duration of four years.

    They were not well-equipped in many cases, suffered Dear John letters, and all the hazards, perhaps more, than our present day soldiers. Certainly much less communication with home than soldiers now have.

    It would be interesting to know whether there are WWII suicide stats. I'll go have a look.

    I'm wondering if the present generation has been less socially conditioned for the circumstances of war than previous ones were.
    "No ray of sunshine is ever lost, but the green which it awakes into existence needs time to sprout, and it is not always granted to the sower to see the harvest. All work that is worth anything is done in faith." - Albert Schweitzer

  4. #14
    Senior Member Anja's Avatar
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    Well. I'm not finding any definitive statistics on suicide rates during WWII. But I did see one mention that suicide rates in the US went down during the war. Today they are on the rise.

    Actually I'm seeing very little relevant info out there.
    "No ray of sunshine is ever lost, but the green which it awakes into existence needs time to sprout, and it is not always granted to the sower to see the harvest. All work that is worth anything is done in faith." - Albert Schweitzer

  5. #15
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    they've always been high, nothing new really

    Oh and it's not 'cuz military life is rough, it's most often due to them getting out. Highest suicide rates are ex-commissioned officers who couldn't get in the civilian world what they had in the military

  6. #16
    Senior Member Anja's Avatar
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    I had hoped to see more comments here, but I have a few thought on a paradox I think I see in present society.

    I think, while violence is rampant in current media, our actual awareness of violence in our lives has become muted. Perhaps the media has had the effect of conditioning us to a casual attitude of death and dying.

    This is a whole 'nother thread all by itself but I have a thought about the sense of unreality the current society has of violence.

    I'm wondering if many who joined the military had their economic advancement in mind at a disadvantage to an awareness of what they were actually agreeing to do.

    We shelter our children from death today. Peope don't die in their homes as a rule but are shuttled off to a stark and sterile hospital environment to die out of sight and out of mind.

    What death they see are the unrealistic presentations of gore and violence on the screen. It doesn't apply to their daily lives and is often viewed as amusement.

    I doubt that any soldier who enters war has a full understanding of the real-life horror he is going to witness.

    Have we lost our resillience to the harsher facts of life?
    "No ray of sunshine is ever lost, but the green which it awakes into existence needs time to sprout, and it is not always granted to the sower to see the harvest. All work that is worth anything is done in faith." - Albert Schweitzer

  7. #17
    Senior Member dga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Halla74 View Post
    It's sad really. These men and women have been through 2,3, maybe even more tours of duty. They have not seen their families. They are stressed to the brink of losing it. My Dad spent 33 years in the U.S. Army, he went to Vietnam for 1 year, and he has said that how our modern Army is expected to serve is not appropriate. Let's see the greedy, bloodsucking CEOs and board members of Blackwater, Halliburton, Wackenhut, CAIC, and KBA serve even a single hour in harm's way.
    Isn't blackwater essentially just a booking agency for mercenaries? it's subcontractors know what they are doing as it won't accept anyone that hasn't already had similar experience (as told to me by a former marine that served in iraq)

  8. #18
    Senior Member Anja's Avatar
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    My deal is that I wasn't aware of war-time suicides increasing during duty during the VietNam War or WWII. Is this something new or were we just more sheltered from one more ugly fact of war?
    "No ray of sunshine is ever lost, but the green which it awakes into existence needs time to sprout, and it is not always granted to the sower to see the harvest. All work that is worth anything is done in faith." - Albert Schweitzer

  9. #19
    Senior Member dga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anja View Post
    My deal is that I wasn't aware of war-time suicides increasing during duty during the VietNam War or WWII. Is this something new or were we just more sheltered from one more ugly fact of war?
    The american public is definitely more sheltered. During ww2, pennies were even switched to steel because copper was needed so badly for the war effort. Bush told everyone to go shopping when bombing iraq. Dan Rather in vietnam was an iconic point in media history. The public sees nothign now that has not gone through the filter of the military.

    Meanwhile, showing a woman's nipple during the superbowl for a couple seconds is a million dollar scandal. Simulated violence on television or in the cinema is considered normal, but simulated sex is considered harmful.

  10. #20
    Senior Member Nonsensical's Avatar
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    I think it's sad, Anja, it really is. A lot of troops are extremely unhappy at war- which obviously no one cares about or is doing anything, and I think it's very depressing that the government doesn't and won't do anything..

    The troops have left families, loved ones, friends, and companions because of their loe for it or love for their country. Afterall, it's not the troops doing bad things, it's the people ordering them around, so in theory, the troops aren't the ones doing anything wrong, but are braving the troubles that the assholes back in the US who are sitting safely behind their desks are too afraid to do. I also hate the liberals who are against the troops, because it's not the troops we should be mad at, it's the government..well...the government we just recently lost. Hopefully Obama will shed our old ways, and more troops can make it back to their loved ones.

    I'm really sorry to hear about this..it really makes you realize how easy off we have things back home..when thousands of people not so different from ourselves are out there in the world, standing up to things we can never imagine..
    Is it that by its indefiniteness it shadows forth the heartless voids and immensities of the universe, and thus stabs us from behind with the thought of annihilation, when beholding the white depths of the milky way?

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