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  1. #11
    Senior Member Maabus1999's Avatar
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    Lindsay Lohan doesn't even know her own sexuality according to her, so this doesn't surprise me.

    Maybe we should just change all race definitions to something more positive like:

    Awesome
    Badass
    Hanging
    Wicked

    So you could say "yeah you see that badass guy standing next to those two wicked guys?

    If anyone comes up with less corny adjectives then me feel free to use them!

  2. #12
    Per Ardua Metamorphosis's Avatar
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    What really gets me is that a remark by Lindsey Lohan over something so trivial sparked a debate in a university.

    Colored or Person of Color...who cares?

    The latter is far too long to seriously use in any conversation.
    "You will always be fond of me. I represent to you all the sins you never had the courage to commit."

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  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by kyuuei View Post
    What I DO think is ignorant is refering to black people as African Americans.. I get slightly irked at the fact that people sometimes even whisper the word "black" like it's a bad thing to refer to them at all in conversation, yet have no problem openly proclaiming that all black people must come from Africa, instead of the many countries and continents where the majority are black.

    It's simply their insecurity about what term is preferred by the people around them. My mother grew up during a time when Black wasn't considered a polite term (at least that is what she claimed) and she always used Colored and she told me as a child it was rude to use the word Black or to mention the skin tone difference in any other way than Colored.

    My older brothers and sisters grew up in a time when people in the media were using African American and it seemed that was considered the polite term to use. Then by the time I was in High School, Black was the word of choice, but one didn't always know if the older Blacks one encountered felt that way, in light of what one had been previously taught. For the most part it's just Whites being unsure, they don't mean harm by it.

    In my early working life in Texas, I actually would wait and listen for what term a Black co-worker would use and then use that term when around them. Within the last three years I got into a debate with my in-laws who believe that it's rude to use the term Black in a professional setting and that one must always use African American to be polite. They are sincere in wanting to be polite, just misinformed. They would probably welcome the Blacks they know giving them a heads-up because they sure didn't believe me!

  4. #14
    Sniffles
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    I honestly do no see the problem there, especially since it's still common to use the term "people of color" in discourse.

    If she stated "It's our first nigger president", "our first jigaboo president" and so forth, you might have a point here.

    I also don't see how it's a sign of covert racism, since she's actually expressing joy over having a "coloured president". A person with actual prejudices towards Blacks would probably not do such a thing - despite the fact many White Supremacists did support Obama in the election.

    This seems to be a classic example of something I've been meditating upon with my Ni, namely that people today are overly sensitive about any remote signs of racism largely because they have no idea what racism really is. That of course being a major legacy of the Post-Civil Rights era, when institutionalised racism was abolished and overt racial bigotry was barred from mainstream discourse. Thus, we now have to delve deeper into peoples' subconscious to supposedly expose their racist inclinations.

    A parallel to this kind of mentality is what existed in the Soviet Union, when Stalin declared that as the bourgeoise are exterminated physically as a class, the class struggle intensifies and becomes more brutal. This is especially true since the bourgeoise have become a more dangerous covert enemy in terms of abstract ideas and attitudes; thus for the good of society it's necessary to target these covert subconscious attitudes head on via indoctrination to expose these inclinations in people, and if necessary through arbitrary means.

    The parallels here are very disturbing, even if in our case the confrontation with these subconscious threats to society will not necessarily lead one to being thrown in a prison camp or executed. Nevertheless, one can still have their reputation and even livelihood destroyed.

    However, it's getting pretty late and I'm not in the best of moods to meditate upon this issue further. Plus, I don't wish to drift this thread off its more immediate topic concern Lohan's remarks.

    Anyways, my two cents on the larger issue.

  5. #15
    Emperor/Dictator kyuuei's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by heart View Post
    It's simply their insecurity about what term is preferred by the people around them. My mother grew up during a time when Black wasn't considered a polite term (at least that is what she claimed) and she always used Colored and she told me as a child it was rude to use the word Black or to mention the skin tone difference in any other way than Colored.

    My older brothers and sisters grew up in a time when people in the media were using African American and it seemed that was considered the polite term to use. Then by the time I was in High School, Black was the word of choice, but one didn't always know if the older Blacks one encountered felt that way, in light of what one had been previously taught. For the most part it's just Whites being unsure, they don't mean harm by it.

    In my early working life in Texas, I actually would wait and listen for what term a Black co-worker would use and then use that term when around them. Within the last three years I got into a debate with my in-laws who believe that it's rude to use the term Black in a professional setting and that one must always use African American to be polite. They are sincere in wanting to be polite, just misinformed. They would probably welcome the Blacks they know giving them a heads-up because they sure didn't believe me!
    They ought to take a vote then and post it publically what they want to be called so that no one is insecure about anything. I understand it entirely.. I just can't think of something like African American to be polite, personally. It just irks me.. It doesn't enrage me. I'll laugh the day someone refers to me as caucasian.. I've never heard it outside of "List Ethnicity here: []White (Not Hispanic)"
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  6. #16
    Per Ardua Metamorphosis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Usehername View Post
    somewhere along the line had show her this word represents this group of people (underground and quiet racism). Think about it--we have to learn our words from somewhere.
    I think this is worthless. The "appropriate" word choice has changed over the past generations as someone already pointed out, so it may not have come from any closet racist. I would venture a guess that most black people probably wouldn't even be offended by this (although I'm not black, obviously).

    And on the African American comment...I know multiple people from Africa (one being my roommate) and they are generally all surprised by our calling black people African American.
    "You will always be fond of me. I represent to you all the sins you never had the courage to commit."

    Reason is, and ought only to be the slave of the passions, and can never pretend to any other office
    than to serve and obey them. - David Hume

  7. #17
    Minister of Propagandhi ajblaise's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peguy View Post
    I honestly do no see the problem there, especially since it's still common to use the term "people of color" in discourse.
    For some reason, "people of color" is a lot more of a generally accepted phrase then "colored person", perhaps because "people of color" can describe all non-white people, it's not just about black people necessarily. That language can conjure up time periods where blacks were a lot more discriminated against than they are now. I can understand why people might take offense to the phrase.

  8. #18
    insert random title here Randomnity's Avatar
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    I didn't realize it was a slur, I just thought it was old-fashioned, from the time when "black" was the rude term and "coloured" the proper one.

    I've really never heard anyone use the term before in real life...not sure why she would, or why anyone would think she intended offense by it.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Randomnity View Post
    I've really never heard anyone use the term before in real life...not sure why she would, or why anyone would think she intended offense by it.
    A distracting news item is needed for a slow news day?

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by ajblaise View Post
    That language can conjure up time periods where blacks were a lot more discriminated against than they are now. I can understand why people might take offense to the phrase.
    That's somewhat the point I was trying to make above; we're not living in those times - which defeats any real point in being that sensitive about it. \

    We seem to be more sensitive about racism today than we were back when racism was more a major issue facing this country - back when Blacks had to worry about cross burnings or lynching far more than simply being called the N word, "coloured", or "nappy headed hoes".

    I don't know about the rest of you, but I myself consider this a far worse example of racial bigotry than Lohan's remarks:
    Dying man heckled by racist yobs
    Apr 7 2006

    A GOOD Samaritan has spoken of his disgust after a dying man was heckled by yobs.

    Travis Marshall, 42, tried in vain to save an elderly driver who had a heart attack at the wheel and careered into a bus.

    But as the victim took his last breath, sick youths in tracksuits and hoods clashed with police and yelled: "He is just a white man."

    Mr Marshall, who performed emergency CPR on the man in St James's Road, Bermondsey, last Friday, said: "It was sickening. Here you had a dying man, people trying to save him and police trying to clear the scene.

    "Then there were these black youths and all they wanted to do was fight the cops. They were saying, 'You think I am scared of you because of your uniform'.....

    icSouthlondon - Dying man heckled by racist yobs

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