User Tag List

First 23456 Last

Results 31 to 40 of 138

  1. #31
    Senior Member ThatsWhatHeSaid's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    MBTI
    INTP
    Enneagram
    5w4
    Posts
    7,233

    Default

    Merged.

  2. #32
    veteran attention whore Jeffster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    MBTI
    ESFP
    Enneagram
    7w6 sx
    Socionics
    SEE Fi
    Posts
    6,727

    Default

    ROFLOLLERCOASTER!
    Jeffster Illustrates the Artisan Temperament <---- click here

    "I like the sigs with quotes in them from other forum members." -- Oberon

    The SP Spazz Youtube Channel

  3. #33
    Babylon Candle Venom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    MBTI
    INTJ
    Enneagram
    1w9 sp/sx
    Posts
    2,128

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by IlyaK1986 View Post

    1) Remove our physical presence from outside our borders, except for bases near our true allies (Israel, Japan, Britain). Then we test our most powerful nuclear weapon to send radiation radars through the roof. Currency not backed by trust in the system is worthless. So too is diplomacy without force. Put the fear of getting a nation detonated in a day into the heart of a dictator, and he'll listen to an eloquent president.
    I agree with this sentiment similar to isolationists. However, I really don't think we need to detonate another hydrogen bomb. I sincerely doubt anyone doubts our air, sea, land and general weapons superiority. We do spend close to 4 times who ever is in second on the military budget.

    2) Education. Now. Remove art, music, and poetry from schools. Those can be done on people's own time. Instead, force massive amounts of science, (chemistry, physics, and computer science), math, and history (with special emphasis on wars and financial history). Foreign languages should no longer be mandatory. Replace with more math and science. Remove most literature from the agenda. Instead, teach critical reading skills and grammar only. Shakespeare can be read on people's own time. Replace the new time with more math and science.
    -take it a step further: create a voucher system. The best schools will get the most money, instead of the current system where the better schools simply drive up the land values in surrounding neighborhoods. That extra value should go directly to the schools.

    -i think an elective system from early on would be fine: make everyone take 1 math course, 2 natural science courses, 1 critical reading/writing course, and one more class could be an art/music/elective. To make up for less classes, include more breaks per class period and make them longer.

    3) In order to make this all work, destroy the teachers' unions and make our k-12 teaching positions as competitive as those found in the financial services industry, and raise compensation to boot. Our colleges are the best in the world because of the competitiveness on both sides of the textbook. Time to do the same with k-12. Our k-12 teachers are the most important people in terms of raising our children. They better be damn good.
    Doctors are already not allowed to form unions, I see no reason why teachers can't be barred from unions as well.
    School could be year round, with more 2 to 3 week long breaks. This would give the teachers a more year round job and thus would justify paying them more. With higher pay, more capable individuals would be compelled to teach.

    4) Make sure the culture in our k-12 schools gets a complete overhaul. A nerd is not someone with freckles, suspenders, a bad fashion sense, and a weak body such that you can bully him or her into doing your homework. A nerd is someone that is going to be raking in six figure salaries, and if you're not a nerd, you're going to be a nobody. Or so we should have kids believe.
    I completely agree on the touchy feely bullshit. No one is a real equal. The fact that people should have equal rights does not mean, everyone has equal talents. The idiots of the classroom often hold back those who can handle more, from ever reaching truly challenging material.

    5) Introductory economics and finance better be taught in the early years of high school, and better be mandatory courses. The amount of people that don't know these two fundamental subjects is staggering.
    in reference to the idiots, you would be shocked to know that econ IS taught in ALL public school where I came from! Sadly people usaully leave that class with their ideals or lack there of unchanged. I owe it to the fact that econ at that level is just common sense. I would guess that many people simply cannot grasp "captain obvious" topics like we would hope.

    6) Random standardized national testing. No set dates for benchmark national standardized exams. Just randomly, over the course of the year, throw one, to make sure that teachers and parents are doing their jobs raising the next generation of thinkers. Standardized exams will include American history, both general and financial, mathematics, chemistry, physics, geometry, algebra, calculus, probability, statistics, computer coding, grammar, critical reading/writing, economics, and finance. How much of each will be dependent upon grade level. By senior year of high school, all of this will be mandatory material.
    I agree that having the standardized tests at the end of the year dictates too much of when and what is being taught.

    7) Final separation of church and state. "One nation, indivisible, with liberty, and justice for all." God is an outdated concept, and anyone that chooses to believe in him can do so on their own time. We don't need it indoctrinated into us every time we stand for the pledge to our country.
    agreed. For example, those who argue against Roe vs Wade, need to state NON RELIGIOUS reasons for why they believe roe vs wade should be overturned. If they cant give any reason other than those relying on the supernatural (it has a soul!) then they have no power in the court system.

    8) Expose this belief of diversity/ethnicity difference for what it really is--reverse discrimination. I don't give a damn if you're Indian or Chinese or Japanese or Russian or American or Native American or African American. The color of your skin or the country of your birth shouldn't make a damn difference. Now your accent and command of the English language is a much different story.
    Agreed. I was at target yesterday. Its like we live in fucking mexico. I have no problem with people who want to come work hard for their own american dream, but learn the language dammit!

    I think the best example for why a lot of the reverse discrimination is so ridiculous is the asian population. Asians earn more than white people, in our own damn country. Why? Because hard work is part of their culture! If the rest of the ethnicities can't compete than tough.

    9) Remove the sanctity of religion. It should not be illegal to discriminate upon it, or to ask about it. The religion you believe in and why you believe in it is a conscious choice you make, and is no different than any other value you hold. Anyone should have any right to ask you about it and why you hold the values you do. Just because there's an invisible man or a whole set of them involved makes no difference.
    On the one hand I agree with you. On the other hand though, I'm not sure that I want to live in a society that forces people to think or not think certain things. As much as I desire a rational society, I do not think you can legislate cultural change. Legislation is the wrong way to deal with what I guess you want dealing with.

    10) Tax obesity. Use said tax money to subsidize gym memberships. Tax negative externality, subsidize positive.

    11) Tax dirty energy. Tax subsidize clean energy. Lower corporate taxes for firms operating within America. Levy massive taxes on any firms that outsource jobs or import non-citizens. It'll cause some pain in the very short run, and should, if my economics are correct, produce much better results in the longer terms.
    Agreed. I think we need a new Manhattan project to solve our energy problems. With the price of oil dropping, I worry that we'll will go back to
    not inovating and just consuming more foriegn oil. The market is sometimes too slow to do anything timely about it.

  4. #34
    Magical Firelie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    MBTI
    INTJ
    Enneagram
    5
    Posts
    836

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by IlyaK1986 View Post

    IMO America's agenda going into the next years should be:

    Blahblahblah numbers
    I'm so glad you're not in charge of the country.

  5. #35
    DoubleplusUngoodNonperson
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    MBTI
    Hype
    Posts
    2,078

    Default

    When I see crap like this it makes my pruned and atrophied F function seek a harrier of wrath. I'm sorry people, I know you hate me, but I have to tell you.

    The central moral code of Christ's teachings is that you accept the people around you. This is a moral code as well as a pragmatic code. Cooperation is infinitely more virtuous than conflict.

    The first amendmant is born out of Christ's embracing of those that seek the mathematical property of infinite divergence when embracing God.

    The founding fathers understood that to explore God as you see fit requires a goverment INDEPENDANT of some arbitrary condition. This is what fucked Europe, and this is what the so called religous fanatics of this country wanted to describe: YOU CANNOT TELL ME HOW TO FEEL ABOUT GOD!! Thus, government will have its testicles removed with regards to telling me how to explore God.

    I don't even understand how you could possibly think we are under some competitive rule of law of religion? As if God divies itself out in discrete packets? You can't afford to be this retarded.

  6. #36
    Sniffles
    Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by The_Liquid_Laser View Post
    On one side you have people saying that the US was founded as a Christian nation. On the other side you have people saying that the US was never in any way a Christian nation. Neither side is entirely accurate.

    It's true that several of our most notable founders were deists, e.g. Thomas Jefferson. However it would be ignorant to ignore the obvious influence of Christianity upon our nation's founders. For example the idea of the "separation between Church and State" was originally conceived and practiced by a Baptist minister.

    Ultimately both sides are right, and both sides are misleading.
    Ehhh....you're on the right path. Like it or not, you cannot begin to understand American concepts or American history without reference to the Christian heritage. It was religious zeal that brought the Pilgrims over, and it was their whole legal system was based upon Biblical law.

    This basic notion had carried over even after the founding of the Republic. The basis of our whole legal philosophy is Anglo-Saxon common law, which itself was based upon the notion of the King being a vicar of Christ, and thus ruling the kingdom on the behalf of Christ the eternal King of Kings.

    It should be interesting to note what Associate Justice of the Supreme Court James Wilson had to say in his 1791 lectures on the nature of law, and how this applies to the newly ratified Constitution. It is also documented that George Washington himself attended these lectures.

    Works of James Wilson

    Here's a little excerpt:
    Of law there are different kinds. All, however, may be arranged in two different classes. 1. Divine. 2. Human laws. The descriptive epithets employed denote, that the former have God, the latter, man, for their author.


    The laws of God may be divided into the following species.


    I. That law, the book of which we are neither able nor worthy to open. Of this law, the author and observer is God. He is a law to himself, as well as to all created things. This law we may name the "law eternal."


    II. That law, which is made for angels and the spirits of the just made perfect. This may be called the "law celestial." This law, and the glorious state for which it is adapted, we see, at present, but darkly and as through a glass: but hereafter we shall see even as we are seen; and shall know even as we are known. From the wisdom and the goodness of the adorable Author and Preserver of the universe, we are justified in concluding, that the celestial and perfect state is governed, as all other things are, by his established laws. What those laws are, it is not yet given us to know; but on one truth we may rely with sure and certain confidence ? those laws are wise and good. For another truth we have infallible authority ? those laws are strictly obeyed: "In heaven his will is done."


    III. That law, by which the irrational and inanimate parts of the creation are governed. The great Creator of all things has established general and fixed rules, according to which all the phenomena of the material universe are produced and regulated. These rules are usually denominated laws of nature. The science, which has those laws for its object, is distinguished by the name of natural philosophy. It is sometimes called, the philosophy of body. Of this science, there are numerous branches.


    IV. That law, which God has made for man in his present state; that law, which is communicated to us by reason and conscience, the divine monitors within us, and by the sacred oracles, the divine monitors without us. This law has undergone several subdivisions, and has been known by distinct appellations, according to the different ways in which it has been promulgated, and the different objects which it respects. As promulgated by reason and the moral sense, it has been called natural; as promulgated by the holy scriptures, it has been called revealed law.


    As addressed to men, it has been denominated the law of nature; as addressed to political societies, it has beep denominated the law of nations.


    But it should always be remembered, that this law, natural or revealed, made for men or for nations, flows from the same divine source: it is the law of God.


    Nature, or, to speak more properly, the Author of nature, has done much for us; but it is his gracious appointment and will, that we should also do much for ourselves. What we do, indeed, must be founded on what he has done; and the deficiencies of our laws must be supplied by the perfections of his. Human law must rest its authority, ultimately, upon the authority of that law, which is divine.


    Of that law, the following are maxims ? that no injury should be done ? that a lawful engagement, voluntarily made, should be faithfully fulfilled. We now see the deep and the solid foundations of human law.


    It is of two species. 1. That which a political society makes for itself. This is municipal law. 2. That which two or more political societies make for themselves. This is the voluntary law of nations.


    In all these species of law ? the law eternal ? the law celestial ? the law natural ? the divine law, as it respects men and nations ? the human law, as it also respects men and nations ? man is deeply and intimately concerned. Of all these species of law, therefore, the knowledge must be most important to man.


    Those parts of natural philosophy, which more immediately relate to the human body, are appropriated to the profession of physick.


    The law eternal, the law celestial, and the law divine, as they are disclosed by that revelation, which has brought life and immortality to light, are the more peculiar objects of the profession of divinity.


    The law of nature, the law of nations, and the municipal law form the objects of the profession of law.


    From this short, but plain and, I hope, just statement of things, we perceive a principle of connexion between all the learned professions; but especially between the two last mentioned. Far from being rivals or enemies, religion and law are twin sisters, friends, and mutual assistants. Indeed, these two sciences run into each other. The divine law, as discovered by reason and the moral sense, forms an essential part of both.


    From this statement of things, we also perceive how important and dignified the profession of the law is, when traced to its sources, and viewed in its just extent.


    The immediate objects of our attention are, the law of nature, the law of nations, and the municipal law of the United States, and of the several states which compose the Union. It will not be forgotten, that the constitutions of the United States, and of the individual states, form a capital part of their municipal law. On the two first of these three great heads, I shall be very general. On the last, especially on those parts of it, which comprehend the constitutions and publick law, I shall be more particular and minute.
    So there have it, a man who was a signer of the Declaration of Independence, "second only to Madision as the principal architect of the Constitution" as my link above mentions, an Associate Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court, and a Professor of Law who gave lectures to our first President about the legal origins and premises of our constitution - notes that religion and law are "twin sisters" and run into each other.

    Perhaps it should also be noted that our system of government was based upon that of the Presbyterian Church.

    Not only that, perhaps I should mention that notions of "seperation of Church and state" go back farther than the Wars of Religion. In fact they descend directly from Christ's dictate to render unto Caesar's what is Caesar's, and render unto God what is God's.

    This concept was a key element of Medieval legal philosophy, in order to help maintain the integrity of the Church from intereference from monarchs.

    St. Thomas Aquinas in the 13th century noted that since faith is a matter of free will, the state has no business forcing non-believers to become Christian, for doing so violates their free will before God.

    The very notion of "Checks and balances" was a Medieval concept as well, where the power of the King was always checked by that of the Church, the aristocracy, local communes and assemblies. Even in the case of Medieval Russia, the power of a Prince was checked by local assemblies called Veches.

    I know during Medieval times in the Tyrol region, the locals protested and won the right from the Emperor not to be taxed without approval from their local assemblies, thus predating the American revolutionary slogan "No taxation without representation" by hundreds of years.

    Speaking of Aquinas, the Neo-Thomist Jacques Maritain noted about the remarkable similarities between the US Constitution and how the Founders framed it with the constitutions of Medieval orders like the Franciscans and Dominicans.

    I've barely even begun to scratch the surface of this issue.

  7. #37
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    MBTI
    ENTJ
    Posts
    481

    Default

    And all of those ideas are outdated. This nation was founded on the separation of church and state. Religion can be practiced on someone's own time.
    I am an ENTJ. I hate political correctness but love smart people ^_^

  8. #38
    Senior Member Eileen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    MBTI
    INFJ
    Enneagram
    6?
    Posts
    2,191

    Default

    I think that it is most fair to say that separation of church and state is a fundamental value of the USA, but that culture and government doesn't exist or form in a vacuum and would obviously have a variety of influences, including religion. That our government may have developed features that resemble religious structures does not negate the importance of religion and government remaining separate.
    INFJ

    "I can never be what I ought to be until you are what you ought to be. You can never be what you ought to be until I am what I ought to be. This is the interrelated structure of reality." -Martin Luther King, Jr.

  9. #39
    Sniffles
    Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by IlyaK1986 View Post
    And all of those ideas are outdated.
    "An imbecile habit has arisen in modern controversy of saying that such and such a creed can be held in one age but cannot be held in another. Some dogma, we are told, was credible in the twelfth century, but is not credible in the twentieth. You might as well say that a certain philosophy can be believed on Mondays, but cannot be believed on Tuesdays...What a man believes depends upon his philosophy, not upon the clock or the century."
    --GK Chesterton, Orthodoxy, pg 278

    Yeah I don't know about you, but I judge truth upon the merits of its arguments, not what the calendar states.

    This nation was founded on the separation of church and state.
    Which is itself a religious concept. Plus as the second principal author of the Constitution just stated, religion and law are "twin sisters".

    Plus, it should be mentioned that the seperation of "Church and state" only applies to Congress - ie the Federal government. At the time of ratification, and for some later, many states had official churches established.

    The notion that the government is to be completely neutral in regards to religion didn't exist within American legal philosophy untill 1947.

  10. #40
    veteran attention whore Jeffster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    MBTI
    ESFP
    Enneagram
    7w6 sx
    Socionics
    SEE Fi
    Posts
    6,727

    Default

    I've grown to hate that phrase "separation of church and state" because it's used to justify ridiculous ideas like that all religious symbols should be removed from public property, and other idiotic notions like that.
    Jeffster Illustrates the Artisan Temperament <---- click here

    "I like the sigs with quotes in them from other forum members." -- Oberon

    The SP Spazz Youtube Channel

Similar Threads

  1. Canadian banks with branches commonly found in the USA?
    By Usehername in forum Home, Garden and Nature
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 08-29-2012, 04:19 PM
  2. Love the New Fact Verifying Culture of the USA
    By nomadic in forum Politics, History, and Current Events
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 10-03-2008, 01:14 PM
  3. When the house was standing...
    By Makaub in forum Arts & Entertainment
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 01-27-2008, 07:11 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO