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  1. #11
    Strongly Ambivalent Ivy's Avatar
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    My parents bought us a set of Great Books when I was 10 or so and when my mom homeschooled me her basic plan was "go read those books." I did, but I had no matrix in which to place them, so I don't think I got as much from the experience as I could have. So I would probably recommend what BW says- start with something broad and specialize as you go.
    The one who buggers a fire burns his penis
    -anonymous graffiti in the basilica at Pompeii

  2. #12
    Minister of Propagandhi ajblaise's Avatar
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    There are a lot of texts and audio on philosophy over at archive.org. A lot of Kant material.

  3. #13
    Tenured roisterer SolitaryWalker's Avatar
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    Those are not works of philosophy, they are works of philosophical literature. The definition of philosophy is an attempt to build a comprehensive view of the world based on logically valid arguments that are founded on premises that could be established based on observations that could be derived from our experiences. (Not faith).

    Those books do not meet the standard of rigor.
    "Do not argue with an idiot. They drag you down to their level and beat you with experience." -- Mark Twain

    “No man but a blockhead ever wrote, except for money.”---Samuel Johnson

    My blog: www.randommeanderings123.blogspot.com/

  4. #14
    Senior Member reason's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlueWing View Post
    Those are not works of philosophy, they are works of philosophical literature. The definition of philosophy is an attempt to build a comprehensive view of the world based on logically valid arguments that are founded on premises that could be established based on observations that could be derived from our experiences. (Not faith).
    No, it's really not.
    A criticism that can be brought against everything ought not to be brought against anything.

  5. #15
    Tenured roisterer SolitaryWalker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by reason View Post
    No, it's really not.
    What is the definition of philosophy?
    "Do not argue with an idiot. They drag you down to their level and beat you with experience." -- Mark Twain

    “No man but a blockhead ever wrote, except for money.”---Samuel Johnson

    My blog: www.randommeanderings123.blogspot.com/

  6. #16
    ByMySword
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    Well, religious books are a good place to start.

    The Bible and The Koran

    And then there are some I read in college.

    The Philosophical Journey by William F. Lawhead

    The one above is a general overview of many different philosophies, so that would be a perfect beginning one to start with. Its great. Also:

    The Art of War by Sun Tzu

    The Prince by Machiavelli (Machiavelli also has a different book called The Art of War as well)

    The Basic Political Writings by Rousseau

    Discourse on Method and Meditations on First Philosophy by Descartes

    The Geneology of Morals and Ecce Homo by Nietzche


    Edit: And I almost forgot:

    Grounding for the Metaphysics of Morals by Kant

  7. #17
    desert pelican Owl's Avatar
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    I'm currently reading A Critical History of Western Philosophy, edited by D.J O'Connor. As the title suggests, this text is more critical than historical, but the authors give a good objective anaysis of whomever they are critiquing before they rip them apart. Thus far, the breadth and depth of this book, combined with its readability, is remarkable. I highly recommend it.

    If you're more interested in understanding the discussions occuring in today's English speaking acadamies, then I'd recommend 100 Years of Philosophy, by John Passmore. This text is historical, not critical, and does a good job of tracing the problems that vexed the precursors of today's (mostly) analytical philosophers, and why and how these philosophers responded to the philosophical challenges of their day--setting up the problems and questions being dealt with now. Mr. Passmore also wrote an expansion covering "contemporary" philosophers, e.g. Carnap, Quine, Kripke, Dummett, etc., whose legacies are just starting to be felt.

    Philosophical Foundation: A Critical Analysis of Basic Belief, by Surrendra Gangadean. This book is a critical examination of the assumptions in just about any popular worldview you can imagine. It's a great intro to both philosophy and religion. Everyone should read this book.


    Finally, The Clarity of God's Existence: the Ethics of Belief after the Enlightenment, by Owen Anderson. This is a must read for all theists, particularly Christian theists. However, this book isn't just for theists: "The audience for this is anyone who is interested in questions about religious belief in the modern world, says the author, who has received a grant from the Harvard Pluralism Project to study the religious diversity of the greater Phoenix area. Are authors like Harris, Dawkins and Hitchens correct in challenging the validity of ones belief in God? Do they successfully show that there is an excuse for unbelief, or even that there is no excuse for belief? My book looks at the many ways the need for clarity has been avoided, and how excuses have built up. I then suggest ways this might be addressed. For this reason, it should be of interest to both the believer and the non-believer."

  8. #18
    Senior Member animenagai's Avatar
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    i think i agree more with BW on this one. i guess you can call 'thus spoke zarathustra' or the bible philosophy if you really wanted to, but honestly, if you talked to a philosophy lecturer/student what they're reading in terms of philosophy, it would not be that. when philosophy becomes preaching, it becomes uninteresting. topics such as religion are fine, but if we're using philosophy, we should be using strong arguments to argue toward religion. modern philosophy us more than just 'this is my opinion' or 'these are the scriptures', it is a very methodical and clinical approach to life's biggest questions. you ever start saying shit like "that's what my grandma told me" or "because the bible said so" during a formal philosophy meeting and you're guaranteed to get torn to pieces.

  9. #19
    Once Was Synarch's Avatar
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    I tend toward the less systematic streams of philosophy. Seems more relevant to life.

    Meditations - Marcus Aurelius.

    I am also a fan of moral wisdom a la Balthasar Gracian and La Rochefoucauld. Concise and instantly applicable, though unlikely to be something regarded as philosophy in the academic sense.

  10. #20
    & Badger, Ratty and Toad Mole's Avatar
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    Default Hannah Arendt and Martin Heidegger (continued)

    Quote Originally Posted by Victor View Post
    No wonder Hannah fell in love with Martin.
    And although Martin was a NAZI and Hannah was a Jew, Hannah never repudiated Martin, even after the war.

    It's inexplicable.

    It's as though evil and love slept in the same bed.

    Who would not want to be loved like that?

    And who could possibly love such evil?

    The love of philosophy is understanding, but the love of Martin passes all understanding.

    Numbness is all that remains.

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