User Tag List

First 12

Results 11 to 15 of 15

  1. #11
    Senior Member Opivy1980's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    MBTI
    INTJ
    Posts
    138

    Default

    Do social conservatives seriously think they are on the winning side? Social conservatism has never won a major battle in the US that hasn't been overturned. Prohibition being the biggest socially conservative win...for a decade and then it was realized that legislating morality is a concept that is impossible and stupid. As far a the religious nut jobs that seem to think the average American wants or cares about what they say, you stay in the South and we'll continue to advance the rest of the country and throw you some scraps. When you're ready to stop your crusade, feel free to look us up.
    Question everything especially yourself.

    Opivy1980

  2. #12
    Senior Member sdalek's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    MBTI
    ISFJ
    Posts
    298

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Wolf View Post
    So, where did you come from to get all the benefits of the US while hating our culture?
    Well, first off, I am a US citizen; Born here. My dad is a Vietnam vet; Served with the 101st airborne. My mother is German and I was raised on German values. And we didn't come here hating the American culture, all the Americans we ever met until we moved here were GI's, black/white/hispanic, didn't make any difference, nice as hell, open-minded, and accepting and that's what we thought ALL Americans were like; Not at all like the people we met at first when we came over here. In the long run, most everyone, except alot of the kids that I met in grade- and high-school (from my perspective), was OK. There was a certain degree of culture shock, especially how openly hostile and pushy religion was at the time and to an extent it is now and how selfish and uncaring some of the people could be. Not like the GI's like I mentioned before. I still see that to a large extent today and the only thing I can relate that to is the average American's failure to be exposed to a larger view of the world, unlike that of most Europeans who have to deal with other nations and other mind-sets, and an "above the law" and elitist opinion a lot of people seem to have today. In a nutshell, it's not the culture, it's some of the people, and as they always say, it's the bad experiences with things that tend to crowd out the better experiences.

  3. #13
    Senior Member darlets's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    357

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jennifer View Post
    BTW, do you have any actual data (or conditions of the data) for this?
    Yes, yes I do. (I think I assumed, incorrectly, it was a well known fact) To be the fair the second part I bolded isn't the boarder scientific community.

    "A study in today's edition of the prestigious science journal "Nature" reveals that members of the scientific community are "more likely than ever to reject God and immortality," discloses Britain's Daily Telegraph.

    That claim is based on another study which repeats a historic survey first made in 1916 by Dr. James Leuba of Bryn Mawr University. It revealed that over eight decades ago, only about 40% of the scientists surveyed expressed belief in any supreme being. Leuba predicted that advances in education and technology would further erode faith in religious claims.

    In 1997, Edward Larson of the University of Georgia decided to revisit Leuba's study and evaluate the prediction that religious belief was disappearing, at least in the scientific community. Author of the book "Summer for the God's" and a professor of science law and history, Larson said that Leuba's original survey raised "good questions."

    "They provoke responses and give much more insight into how people think than the vague Gallup poll question, 'Do you believe in God?'" he told a writer from Research Reporter.

    Larson closely followed Leuba's methodology, repeating the same questions and attempting to find a representative sample which met the original survey profile. "I had no idea how it would turn out," Larson said.

    60% responded, a figure considered high for any surveys. Of those, 40% expressed belief in a deity, while nearly 45% did not. Larson's survey also discovered that physicists were less likely to have such faith, while mathematicians were significantly more likely to believe in a supreme being, as defined by Leuba.

    "NATURE" SURVEY -- LESS AND LESS BELIEF

    The follow-up study reported in "Nature" reveals that the rate of belief is lower than eight decades ago. The latest survey involved 517 members of the National Academy of Sciences; half replied. When queried about belief in "personal god," only 7% responded in the affirmative, while 72.2% expressed "personal disbelief," and 20.8% expressed "doubt or agnosticism." Belief in the concept of human immortality, i.e. life after death declined from the 35.2% measured in 1914 to just 7.9%. 76.7% reject the "human immortality" tenet, compared with 25.4% in 1914, and 23.2% claimed "doubt or agnosticism" on the question, compared with 43.7% in Leuba's original measurement. Again, though, the highest rate of belief in a god was found among mathematicians (14.3%), while the lowest was found among those in the life sciences fields -- only 5.5%."
    "The time you enjoy wasting is not wasted time."
    Bertrand Russell

    http://rayofsolar.blogspot.com/
    http://zeropointseven.blogspot.com/

  4. #14
    Senior Member darlets's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    357

    Default

    Of course, it's a global conspiracy.

    Atheism - CreationWiki, the encyclopedia of creation science

    "The scientific community, above any other subgroup of the population, has become overwhelmingly atheistic. According to a 1998 report in Nature, a recent survey finds that, "among the top natural scientists, disbelief is greater than ever; almost total". Interestingly, the biologists in the National Academy of Sciences were found to possess the lowest rate of belief of all the science disciplines, with only 5.5% believing in God.[5] This decline in belief in biologists strongly indicates the nature of the cause, and the ability of the teaching of evolutionary biology to turn people away from a belief in God.

    ...
    Education in these naturalistic philosophies, and the pervasive teaching of evolution is almost certainly the principal influence affecting the rise of atheism in our scientific community. Evolution may be better called evolutionism as it is considered a religion by many. Evolution is the champion theory of secular humanism, and a scientific community now totally under the control of an atheistic majority. Evolution is being used in an attempt to explain the origin and evolution of life on earth without a supernatural creation. These theories are being taught as a matter of fact in science classes today, and such teaching will affect the way people view the world. If they are left unchallenged, this inundation will cause belief in God as the source of life to diminish, and evolution ultimately has the power to convince people there is no God. "

    and back in reality
    Ken Miller On Apes and Humans

    Ken Miller On Whales
    "The time you enjoy wasting is not wasted time."
    Bertrand Russell

    http://rayofsolar.blogspot.com/
    http://zeropointseven.blogspot.com/

  5. #15
    Glowy Goopy Goodness The_Liquid_Laser's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    MBTI
    ENTP
    Posts
    3,377

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by darlets View Post
    Yes, yes I do. (I think I assumed, incorrectly, it was a well known fact) To be the fair the second part I bolded isn't the boarder scientific community.

    "A study in today's edition of the prestigious science journal "Nature" reveals that members of the scientific community are "more likely than ever to reject God and immortality," discloses Britain's Daily Telegraph.

    That claim is based on another study which repeats a historic survey first made in 1916 by Dr. James Leuba of Bryn Mawr University. It revealed that over eight decades ago, only about 40% of the scientists surveyed expressed belief in any supreme being. Leuba predicted that advances in education and technology would further erode faith in religious claims.

    In 1997, Edward Larson of the University of Georgia decided to revisit Leuba's study and evaluate the prediction that religious belief was disappearing, at least in the scientific community. Author of the book "Summer for the God's" and a professor of science law and history, Larson said that Leuba's original survey raised "good questions."

    "They provoke responses and give much more insight into how people think than the vague Gallup poll question, 'Do you believe in God?'" he told a writer from Research Reporter.

    Larson closely followed Leuba's methodology, repeating the same questions and attempting to find a representative sample which met the original survey profile. "I had no idea how it would turn out," Larson said.

    60% responded, a figure considered high for any surveys. Of those, 40% expressed belief in a deity, while nearly 45% did not. Larson's survey also discovered that physicists were less likely to have such faith, while mathematicians were significantly more likely to believe in a supreme being, as defined by Leuba.

    "NATURE" SURVEY -- LESS AND LESS BELIEF

    The follow-up study reported in "Nature" reveals that the rate of belief is lower than eight decades ago. The latest survey involved 517 members of the National Academy of Sciences; half replied. When queried about belief in "personal god," only 7% responded in the affirmative, while 72.2% expressed "personal disbelief," and 20.8% expressed "doubt or agnosticism." Belief in the concept of human immortality, i.e. life after death declined from the 35.2% measured in 1914 to just 7.9%. 76.7% reject the "human immortality" tenet, compared with 25.4% in 1914, and 23.2% claimed "doubt or agnosticism" on the question, compared with 43.7% in Leuba's original measurement. Again, though, the highest rate of belief in a god was found among mathematicians (14.3%), while the lowest was found among those in the life sciences fields -- only 5.5%."
    It shouldn't be surprising that scientists are unlikely to believe in God. Science is the exact opposite of faith by definition. Faith is the belief in that which cannot be directly observed. Science is the belief in that which can be directly observed. It's basically taking all of the "faith deficient" people and putting them together in one category.

    Also among scientists it shouldn't be surprising that mathematicians are the most likely to believe in God. Pure mathematics is not based on the natural world, so it doesn't necessarily require that you believe what you directly observe.
    My wife and I made a game to teach kids about nutrition. Please try our game and vote for us to win. (Voting period: July 14 - August 14)
    http://www.revoltingvegetables.com

Similar Threads

  1. Problem of Religious bigotry
    By SolitaryWalker in forum Philosophy and Spirituality
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 01-26-2013, 03:57 PM
  2. Religious Testimonies & Authenticity
    By Totenkindly in forum Philosophy and Spirituality
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: 07-06-2011, 12:37 PM
  3. Religious Ambiguity.
    By Makaub in forum The Bonfire
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 02-04-2008, 01:19 AM
  4. How religious are you?
    By Economica in forum The Bonfire
    Replies: 53
    Last Post: 08-19-2007, 01:01 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO