User Tag List

First 7891011 Last

Results 81 to 90 of 164

  1. #81
    Courage is immortality Valiant's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    MBTI
    ENTJ
    Enneagram
    8w7 sx/so
    Socionics
    EIE
    Posts
    3,919

    Default

    I think that research is bullshit. If a person is raised without a God, and don't get anything - like SCIENCE - to replace it, ofcourse he or she is going to create things to believe in, in order to explain things that he or she cannot understand.

    On the other hand, if a person is atheist by choice, based on rationality, the chance of being superstitious is probably much smaller. Stupid people will always need gods and superstitions to explain things.

    Mightier than the tread of marching armies is the power of an idea whose time has come

  2. #82
    Banned
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    MBTI
    type
    Posts
    9,100

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by YourLocalJesus View Post
    If a person is raised without a God, and don't get anything - like SCIENCE - to replace it, ofcourse he or she is going to create things to believe in, in order to explain things that he or she cannot understand.

    On the other hand, if a person is atheist by choice, based on rationality, the chance of being superstitious is probably much smaller.
    /thread

  3. #83
    Courage is immortality Valiant's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    MBTI
    ENTJ
    Enneagram
    8w7 sx/so
    Socionics
    EIE
    Posts
    3,919

    Default

    /piece of string

    Mightier than the tread of marching armies is the power of an idea whose time has come

  4. #84
    Member Oleander's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    MBTI
    INFP
    Posts
    86

    Default

    I can just about cope with the idea of 'God' as standing for abstract common conscience, something like Jung's 'collective unconscious' that in the past was symbolised as a personification because that's how they treated abstractions - like nobody today thinks of Justice with her scales and sword as a real super-human Person dispensing Justice but it's possible that once the less educated did.

    That has nothing to do with whether anybody is superstitious or not because if atheists are more superstitious than theists then the definition of 'superstition' has been changed to exclude whatever superstitions the claimant approves of as 'religion'.

    I find it very hard to believe that atheists are more superstitious than Roman Catholic or Orthodox or Hindu or Shinto or even Buddhist peasants capable of seeing visions and saints and spirits in every weird stain. I think whoever came out with this one just excludes their own personal superstition as being 'fact'.

  5. #85
    Sniffles
    Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by YourLocalJesus View Post
    If a person is raised without a God, and don't get anything - like SCIENCE - to replace it, ofcourse he or she is going to create things to believe in, in order to explain things that he or she cannot understand.
    You're confusing science with scientism.

    On the other hand, if a person is atheist by choice, based on rationality, the chance of being superstitious is probably much smaller.
    Yeah well, the evidence suggests otherwise.


    Stupid people will always need gods and superstitions to explain things.
    Why are atheists so obsessed with this notion? Even if this was so, it still wouldn't disprove religious claims. It's a meaningless argument.

  6. #86
    Courage is immortality Valiant's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    MBTI
    ENTJ
    Enneagram
    8w7 sx/so
    Socionics
    EIE
    Posts
    3,919

    Default

    Those are your personal opinions, wich you personally regard as facts. Get your head straight.

    Mightier than the tread of marching armies is the power of an idea whose time has come

  7. #87
    Sniffles
    Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Oleander View Post
    I find it very hard to believe that atheists are more superstitious than Roman Catholic or Orthodox or Hindu or Shinto or even Buddhist peasants capable of seeing visions and saints and spirits in every weird stain.
    I'll admit that many Catholics do claim such encounters, but interestingly enough it's usually more devout Catholics who call bullshit on such incidents, even claiming that such claims do only harm for the faith. I remember having such a discussion with fellow Catholics concerning an incident where people claimed to see a vision of the Virgin Mary in their freezer.

  8. #88
    Sniffles
    Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by YourLocalJesus View Post
    Those are your personal opinions, wich you personally regard as facts. Get your head straight.
    Perhaps you should follow your own advice. There's a clear philosophical difference between scientism and science, and more than a few studies have confirmed the conclusions of this study. If you wish, we can even dive into the history books.

  9. #89
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    MBTI
    ENTJ
    Posts
    481

    Default

    I believe in astrology more than I do God.

    That said:

    Wow, religious people are calling ANYONE else superstitious!?

    Wow...well, I can't say it better than this guy did:

    YouTube - George Carlin - Religion is Bullshit - HQ
    I am an ENTJ. I hate political correctness but love smart people ^_^

  10. #90
    Sniffles
    Guest

    Default

    As for the nature of superstitions, the Catholic Encyclopedia gives a good basic outline:
    There are four species of superstitions:
    • improper worship of the true God (indebitus veri Dei cultus);
    • idolatry;
    • divination;
    • vain observances, which include magic and occult arts.


    This division is based upon the various ways in which religion may be vitiated by excess. Worship becomes indebitus cultus when incongruous, meaningless, improper elements are added to the proper and approved performance; it becomes idolatrous when it is offered to creatures set up as divinities or endowed with divine attributes. Divination consists in the attempt to extract from creatures, by means of religious rites, a knowledge of future events or of things known to God alone. Under the head of vain observances come all those beliefs and practices which, at least by implication, attribute supernatural or preternatural powers for good or for evil to causes evidently incapable of producing the expected effects. The number and variety of superstitions appear from the following list of those most in vogue at different periods of history:
    • astrology, the reading of the future and of man's destiny from the stars;
    • aeromancy, divinations by means of the air and winds;
    • amulets, things worn as a remedy or preservative against evils or mischief, such as diseases or witchcraft;
    • chiromancy, or palmistry, divination by the lines of the hand;
    • capnomancy, by the ascent or motion of smoke;
    • catroptomancy, by mirrors;
    • alomancy, by salt;
    • cartomancy, by playing cards;
    • anthropomancy, by inspection of human viscera;
    • belomancy, by the shuffling of arrows (Ezekiel 21:21);
    • geomancy, by points, lines or figures traced on the ground;
    • hydromancy, by water;
    • idolatry, the worship of idols;
    • Sabianism, the worship of the sun, moon, and stars;
    • Zoolatry, Anthropolatry, and Fetishism, the worship of animals, man, and things without sense;
    • Devil-worship;
    • the worship of abstract notions personified, e.g. Victory, Peace, Fame, Concord, which had temples and a priesthood for the performance of their cult;
    • necromancy, the evocation of the dead, as old as history and perpetuated in contemporary Spiritism;
    • oneiromancy, the interpretation of dreams;
    • philtres, potions, or charms intended to excite love;
    • omens or prognostics of future events;
    • witchcraft and magic in all their ramifications;
    • lucky and unlucky days, numbers, persons, things, actions;
    • the evil eye, spells, incantations, ordeals, etc.


    CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Superstition
    I like how they cite Cicero's distinction: "Superstition is the baseless fear of the gods, religion the pious worship."

    Then they note St. Thomas Aquinas' distintion that "Superstition sins by excess of religion, and this differs from the vice of irreligion, which sins by defect. The theological virtue of religion stands midway between the two."

    If one take the more Thomist perspective, it becomes clear how religion can be a guard against superstition while irreligion would not. Without religion, the barrier between the two extremes comes down.

Similar Threads

  1. Which function more likely to land you in the Psych Ward: Ne or Ni?
    By mysavior in forum Myers-Briggs and Jungian Cognitive Functions
    Replies: 31
    Last Post: 01-04-2011, 12:56 PM
  2. sucky song=more likely to die in a game?
    By prplchknz in forum The Bonfire
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 06-20-2009, 06:25 AM
  3. What type is most likely to fall in love?
    By Mole in forum Myers-Briggs and Jungian Cognitive Functions
    Replies: 45
    Last Post: 06-30-2008, 12:14 PM
  4. I need something to believe in
    By ygolo in forum General Psychology
    Replies: 48
    Last Post: 02-15-2008, 10:50 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO