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  1. #1
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    Default The School of Life's updated ten commandments

    I came across these on the Book of Life's website, an offshoot of the School of Life.

    I don't really have a discussion in mind that I was hoping to start with this. I enjoyed these and wanted to share. I think they are some insightful and well-written virtues of character. #4 and #5 particularly resonated with me.

    An Updated Ten Commandments


    1. The good person is at all times highly aware of their flaws and committed to becoming a better version of themselves. They are not insulted if people point out their need for evolution, even if this is done rather clumsily. They believe in their own moral education.

    2. The good person knows that everyone is deeply damaged and a little mad, starting with (of course) themselves. They are unfrightened by their own strangeness and are committed to informing those around them of it in very good time, and apologising retrospectively when they have failed at this. They understand that part of their duty is to have a ready answer to the legitimate question, ‘And how are you mad?’

    3. The good person is loyal in relationships not because they think their lover is perfect, but because they know that everyone is pretty imperfect and rather hard to live with at close range. They accept that the only people we can ever think of as normal or easy are people we don’t yet know very well.

    4. The good person knows that it is impossible to be wholly understood by anyone and accepts that things are going well if one is very lonely in around only half of the key areas of one’s life.

    5. The good person tries hard never to assume that other people should know what they are thinking of without having been told. They try to resist sulking (behaviour that stems from an incensed belief that others should know why we are upset without us having informed them) – and are committed to teaching others about the contents of their minds.

    6. The good person looks at people who are behaving badly as if they might be small children; that is with patience, charity and an active search for mitigating circumstances. Though our societies stress the insult of being treated as younger than one is, the good person knows it is the greatest privilege for anyone to look beyond the apparently strong yet nasty adult to the worried, anxious and really rather nice child within.

    7. Confronted with a piece of stupidity or evil which they could never be guilty of, the good person doesn’t fall into self-righteousness. They swiftly remember all the many stupid and evil things they have at other points, over different things, been guilty of. They don’t lose sight of how much they overall stand in need of the charity and forgiveness of others.

    8. The good person is committed to searching for the funny side of people who might appear merely desperately irritating. They look at others like characters in a comedy rather than a tragedy. They know that the greatest achievement is to be able to move from seeing someone as an ‘idiot’ to considering them as that most privileged of beings: a ‘loveable idiot.’

    9. The good person is a firm believer in restraint and in not immediately saying certain things that are on their minds. They hold that being fully oneself can entail revealing levels of melodrama and rage that one should spare any human one cares about.

    10. The good person knows that the best protection against impatience and paranoia is a little gently-worn pessimism. They budget for disappointment far ahead of time. They don’t cry constantly only because they have understood that the whole of existence is – in many ways – worthy of tears. Their constant awareness of the possibility of death and catastrophe makes them especially appreciative of small things that happen to go well. They relish flowers, balmy skies and so-called ‘boring days’ when everyone manages to go to bed relatively content.
    Likes Cloudpatrol, Eilonwy, N/A, Video, Poki liked this post

  2. #2
    Senior(ita) Member Cloudpatrol's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ingrid in grids View Post
    I came across these on the Book of Life's website, an offshoot of the School of Life.

    I don't really have a discussion in mind that I was hoping to start with this. I enjoyed these and wanted to share. I think they are some insightful and well-written virtues of character. #4 and #5 particularly resonated with me.

    An Updated Ten Commandments


    1. The good person is at all times highly aware of their flaws and committed to becoming a better version of themselves. They are not insulted if people point out their need for evolution, even if this is done rather clumsily. They believe in their own moral education.

    2. The good person knows that everyone is deeply damaged and a little mad, starting with (of course) themselves. They are unfrightened by their own strangeness and are committed to informing those around them of it in very good time, and apologising retrospectively when they have failed at this. They understand that part of their duty is to have a ready answer to the legitimate question, ‘And how are you mad?’

    3. The good person is loyal in relationships not because they think their lover is perfect, but because they know that everyone is pretty imperfect and rather hard to live with at close range. They accept that the only people we can ever think of as normal or easy are people we don’t yet know very well.

    4. The good person knows that it is impossible to be wholly understood by anyone and accepts that things are going well if one is very lonely in around only half of the key areas of one’s life.

    5. The good person tries hard never to assume that other people should know what they are thinking of without having been told. They try to resist sulking (behaviour that stems from an incensed belief that others should know why we are upset without us having informed them) – and are committed to teaching others about the contents of their minds.

    6. The good person looks at people who are behaving badly as if they might be small children; that is with patience, charity and an active search for mitigating circumstances. Though our societies stress the insult of being treated as younger than one is, the good person knows it is the greatest privilege for anyone to look beyond the apparently strong yet nasty adult to the worried, anxious and really rather nice child within.

    7. Confronted with a piece of stupidity or evil which they could never be guilty of, the good person doesn’t fall into self-righteousness. They swiftly remember all the many stupid and evil things they have at other points, over different things, been guilty of. They don’t lose sight of how much they overall stand in need of the charity and forgiveness of others.

    8. The good person is committed to searching for the funny side of people who might appear merely desperately irritating. They look at others like characters in a comedy rather than a tragedy. They know that the greatest achievement is to be able to move from seeing someone as an ‘idiot’ to considering them as that most privileged of beings: a ‘loveable idiot.’

    9. The good person is a firm believer in restraint and in not immediately saying certain things that are on their minds. They hold that being fully oneself can entail revealing levels of melodrama and rage that one should spare any human one cares about.

    10. The good person knows that the best protection against impatience and paranoia is a little gently-worn pessimism. They budget for disappointment far ahead of time. They don’t cry constantly only because they have understood that the whole of existence is – in many ways – worthy of tears. Their constant awareness of the possibility of death and catastrophe makes them especially appreciative of small things that happen to go well. They relish flowers, balmy skies and so-called ‘boring days’ when everyone manages to go to bed relatively content.
    I "liked" this but in truth: I LOVE it. The focus on reasonable, personal accountability is GRAND.

    Thanks for posting.
    Likes meowington, Haven liked this post

  3. #3
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    I disagree, aswel as other Christians. Are you going to steal the name ten commandments? Why not 9 or 11. Haha, thats when the twin towers fell.

    Theres a guy here who created a new martial art, he called it HAVA. He has a black belt in jiu-jutsu. I told him you can't just create new systems, don't you have trust in the old masters? Likewise you, i am sure you can find all good stuff in religion generally (i'm muslim). Pay homaga and give honor where it belongs.

    People just have no respect.

  4. #4
    Bummer geedoenfj's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mustafa View Post
    I disagree, aswel as other Christians. Are you going to steal the name ten commandments? Why not 9 or 11. Haha, thats when the twin towers fell.

    Theres a guy here who created a new martial art, he called it HAVA. He has a black belt in jiu-jutsu. I told him you can't just create new systems, don't you have trust in the old masters? Likewise you, i am sure you can find all good stuff in religion generally (i'm muslim). Pay homaga and give honor where it belongs.

    People just have no respect.
    Sure this shows a lot of respect!!
    Work for a cause not for Applause
    Live to express not to Impress



    6w7 > 1w2 > 4w3


  5. #5
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    Thanks @geedoenfj

  6. #6
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    Very nice. These are still quite in fact difficult to follow but any noble person would follow these as far as I know.
    F O R E V E R


    When it matters, everyone's the same.




  7. #7

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    I'd recommend things like this to anyone who has been able to actually profess and keep the original ten.
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  8. #8
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    Nice (trully)

    My only criticism is that this is pretty unrealistic to expect from most people.
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Virtual ghost View Post
    Nice (trully)

    My only criticism is that this is pretty unrealistic to expect from most people.
    I agree. They are virtues, not a checklist.
    Likes N/A, geedoenfj liked this post

  10. #10
    Senior(ita) Member Cloudpatrol's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ingrid in grids View Post
    I agree. They are virtues, not a checklist.
    @Virtual ghost @Forever

    I'm always surprised by blowback to these kinds of things. Modern society is so focused on comfort and things being easy.

    Lots of things that are worthy in life take huge amounts of effort. It's easier to eat chocolate cake and sleep in than it is to have moderation and wake up early to work out? But, the benefits can be worth the sacrifice.

    Yeah, it's easy to be frustrated, judging, self-righteous, to not hold one's tongue...but is it THAT difficult to take a breath and be mindfully reasonable?

    It is impossible to keep such lists perfectly but I wonder what things would look like - if more people aspired to integrate such things - more fully into their person?
    Likes Poki, geedoenfj liked this post

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