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  1. #1
    Senior Member Mal12345's Avatar
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    Default "Many Lives, Many Masters" (BUUK REVEEW)

    In the office, pondering Catherine's latest revelations, I wondered what our Founding Fathers would have thought about the proposition that all humans are not created equal. People are born with talents, abilities, and powers accrued from other lifetimes. "But eventually we will reach a point where we will all be equal." I suspected that this point was many, many lifetimes distant.

    So writes Brian L. Weiss, Master and Author of the book "Many Lives, Many Masters," who has past-life regressed his psychiatric patients and has come to believe he "knows stuff now." https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brian_Weiss

    Imagine if you will, a psychiatrist with no philosophical training whatsoever, who thinks he has outsmarted the Founding Fathers by life-regressing one of his patients.

    Dr. Weiss, the Founding Fathers did not say we are all born with equal talents and abilities. The Founding Fathers did say that we are all born with equal rights, that is, the rights to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. Even if that only applied to European white males at the time, it is still what they said. And it was a political statement, not a psychological or physiological statement as you believe it to be. We all know that some people are born with disabilities while others are born with outstanding capabilities. That's not the point. The point the Founding Fathers made is that all should be treated as equal under the law no matter what their talents or lack of same.

    I don't, however, plan on giving his book a scathing review. I think the entire life-regression/progression topic is very interesting, and the good doctor is obviously very well-read in the pursuit of technical knowledge (minus the entire field of abstract conceptual thinking, obviously). Some people like to examine car engines, other people like to examine people's minds. But it's all the same on a certain level, because neither interest is particularly abstract in nature.

    A Buddhist once said that from great doubt comes great enlightenment (satori). Dr. Weiss states in his book that he started out as a doubter, a skeptic. He was eventually persuaded into becoming a believer through the accidental past-life regression of one of his psychiatric patients via hypnosis. A Sensor (and probable ISTJ in his case) achieves enlightenment through experiment and experience; but an Intuitive (such as myself) already has it. So the book is interesting from the viewpoint of someone such as myself who already knows in observing someone who has or had no clue as to the sort of spiritual morass he is getting himself into.

    If you are interested in past-life regression stories, this is the book for you. If you don't care about the topic, then you're not ready for it. If you're into books of a more conceptual or abstract nature, then this author did not write his book for you.

    As for me, I'll continue reading this until I eventually get bored.
    "If you try to build something that is idiot-proof, the universe will build a better idiot."
    I'm an extrovert trapped within an introverted soul.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Mal12345's Avatar
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    This is interesting:

    "But life is endless, so we never die; we were never really born. We just pass through different phases. There is no end. Humans have many dimensions. But time is not as we see time, but rather in lessons that are learned."

    So speaketh a Master.

    Or is it a human from the 5th dimension as in the movie Interstellar?

    Time is a human concept, not a thing. Or it is a form of perception as with Kant, but it is still not a thing (yet real). Knowledge comes from seeing that every thing is only a phase of existence, and that reality is not a thing but a concept for us, a way of forming understanding out of our perceptions. But it is only one way.
    "If you try to build something that is idiot-proof, the universe will build a better idiot."
    I'm an extrovert trapped within an introverted soul.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Mal12345's Avatar
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    @Legion

    ". . . Wisdom is achieved very slowly. This is because intellectual knowledge, easily acquired, must be transformed into 'emotional,' or subconscious, knowledge. Once transformed, the imprint is permanent. Behavioral practice is the necessary catalyst of this reaction. Without action, the concept will wither and fade. Theoretical knowledge without practical application is not enough."

    As I finish reading this book (a short read of a few hours), I find myself reminded of all the things I already know. But that's okay. I'll simply pass it on to others in the form of reminders of things they didn't know they already knew.
    "If you try to build something that is idiot-proof, the universe will build a better idiot."
    I'm an extrovert trapped within an introverted soul.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Mal12345's Avatar
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    Here's a rather horrifying spiritual prediction from this book, which I'll paraphrase.

    The human race, because of all of its problems, will eventually destroy itself - sooner than you think. But nature itself will carry on - at least, the plants will.
    "If you try to build something that is idiot-proof, the universe will build a better idiot."
    I'm an extrovert trapped within an introverted soul.
    Likes Legion liked this post

  5. #5
    Senior Member Mal12345's Avatar
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    Here's a sweet story about a past-life regression:

    She stayed for all the sessions and at their end approached me with her report. It was so important that I asked her to share it with the group. During the week, she had experienced several regressions, all covering the same life, which took place near Jerusalem at the time of Jesus. She was a poor male peasant, a powerful man with huge arms and shoulders, but spiritually sensitive and fond of birds and animals. He lived in a wooden house by the side of the road with his wife and daughter, bothering no one. One day, the peasant found a mourning dove that had broken its wing, and knelt to care for it. A Roman soldier, marching with an elite corps of the palace guard, was annoyed by this man blocking his path, and kicked him savagely in the back, breaking several vertebrae. Others of the corps set fire to his house, killing his wife and child. The peasant's bitterness and hatred of the Romans burned bright within him. From that moment on, he trusted no one. His back never healed.
    In despair, broken physically and emotionally, he moved close to the main temple within the walls of Jerusalem where he lived in a lean-to, existing on the vegetables he was able to grow. He was unable to work, getting around only by leaning on a sturdy walking stick and his one animal, a donkey. People thought he was senile, but he was merely old and broken. News of a rabbi who was becoming famous as a healer caught his attention, and he traveled a great distance to hear a sermon by this man—it was the Sermon on the Mount—expecting not to be healed or comforted in any way, but curious all the same. The rabbi's followers were appalled at the sight of the peasant and shooed him away. He hid behind a bush and was able to meet Yeshi's eyes.* "It was like looking into bottomless pits filled with endless compassion," Victoria told me.
    Yeshua said to the peasant, "Do not go far," and he obeyed for the rest of the day.
    The encounter brought the peasant not healing but hope. He went back to his lean-to, inspired by the rabbi's sermon, which he found "ringing and true."
    (Victoria called him Yeshi, the diminutive of Yeshua, the rabbi's Aramaic name. Jesus, the name we know him by, is Greek. Victoria had never heard the name Yeshi until she encountered it in her regression.)
    When the rabbi was about to return to Jerusalem, the peasant became stricken with anxiety. He knew Yeshua was in a dangerous situation, having heard rumors of what the hated Romans had planned for him. He tried to reach the rabbi to warn him, but he was too late. The next time they communicated, Yeshua was struggling under the weight of a huge wooden beam on his way to being crucified. He was, the peasant knew, extremely dehydrated. Amazed at his own courage, he reached out to Yeshua with a cloth soaked in water to wet his mouth, but Yeshua had already passed by. The peasant felt terrible, but then Yeshua looked back at him, again with infinite compassion in his eyes despite his physical struggle, dehydration, and fatigue. Though Yeshua did not speak, the peasant became aware of his words that etched themselves telepathically in his mind: "It's all right. This was meant to be." Yeshua walked on. The peasant followed him to Calvary, to the crucifixion.
    Victoria's next memory was of herself as the peasant standing alone in the pouring rain, sobbing, minutes after Yeshua's death on the cross. Yeshua was the only one he trusted since his family was killed, and now the rabbi, too, was dead. Suddenly he felt what Victoria described as "electricity" at the top of his head. It shot down his spine, and he became aware that his back was straight; he was no longer hunchbacked or crippled. He was strong again.
    "If you try to build something that is idiot-proof, the universe will build a better idiot."
    I'm an extrovert trapped within an introverted soul.

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