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  1. #21
    Nips away your dignity Fluffywolf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lark View Post
    I think that it is less simple than that, its a little like the question of environment, it shapes people but as they are being shaped by it they are shaping it too.
    Ah yes, but I personally like to think of evolution in a more universal manner.

    So as consciousness is a product of evolution, is therefor also part of evolution. And one must not look at consciousness being able to affect evolution, for it is evolution.

    But that's a tangent for another topic and not a very interesting one at that. I was merely responding to the honey badgers interesting traits of survivability in harsh environments almost showing an immunity to responsibility. Or at the very least show how evolution and making sense of ones actions, does not require consciousness. Which is quite interesting when discussing evolution, but less so when discussing responsibility.

    I suppose responsibility is merely one tool for advancement. One of many.
    ~Self-depricating Megalomaniacal Superwolf

  2. #22
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    When you make a commitment, you are responsible to honor that that commitment.
    When you run someone over, you are responsible for his death.
    When you're the best player on a basketball team, you're responsible to make the game winning shot.

    You're right. It comes in many forms. It's a broad term.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Craft View Post
    What's your personal take on it? I can never get a decent grasp of this concept. Responsible to what? Responsible to whom? Isn't that a relative thing? Isn't that dependent on what you personally care about? "This is your responsibility." It always seems connected to a social group, and it's always often about the more influential members of that group. It seems like socially agreed roles. But then, there's that line from Spiderman, "With great power, comes great responsibility", being a superhero is not a socially agreed role.
    I think responsibility is linked to generosity. It is best and ideal when it's taken on (reached for), rather than have it put upon (received/caught/inherited). In this light, it's also possible that responsibility is a belief. I think the superhero role aligns with this.

    The mundane, less idealistic manifestation of responsibility is probably more socially agreed, even if it's implicit > explicit. Btw: who do you mean by "influential members"? Those with wealth and status, or did you mean (voted-in) heads of state?

    Quote Originally Posted by Craft View Post
    What is it exactly?
    I suspect it might be an impulse.

    N.B. Didn't read the thread. Just the OP's OP.

  4. #24
    movin melodies kiddykat's Avatar
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    What's your personal take on it? I can never get a decent grasp of this concept. Responsible to what? Responsible to whom? Isn't that a relative thing? Isn't that dependent on what you personally care about? "This is your responsibility." It always seems connected to a social group, and it's always often about the more influential members of that group. It seems like socially agreed roles. But then, there's that line from Spiderman, "With great power, comes great responsibility", being a superhero is not a socially agreed role. What is it exactly?
    Self-responsibility is the act of recognizing and knowing the role one plays in creating the life he or she wants, but exists within context to the situation.

    If a kid were born into child prostitution and wants out, he/she may feel a sense of self-responsibility to fight each day, but he/she cannot do it alone without the help or support of friends and family or strangers since they are at the mercy of pimps.

    Self-responsibility works like social responsibility, in which what you are responsible for, also effects and influences others. The system doesn't work only within itself. Self-responsibility requires an integration of the environment and the world around you.

    Ayn Rand was self-responsible, for helping create a society of psychopaths.

    Ghandi was self-responsible, for helping people out of societal oppression and segregation.

  5. #25
    Senior Member Frosty's Avatar
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    Responsibility seems like a concept that is generally pushed as one thing, while it is generally forgotten that everyone pretty much inhabits their own personal world within the one that people generally place emphasis on.

    How being responsible is generally seen to mean is performing the traditional 'duties' that are expected of you in a way that is sustainable to others in the outside world. But while all is fine if you are able to perform up to measures of society, if you are not responsible to youself than you worlds will change from being two strong overlapping and interconnected circles to a mess of erratically mismangled shapes that beat against each other causing turmoil that deranges both what you experience and how you experience it.

    You have to be responsible mentally, doesn't matter how you choose to be responsible with your mental health, but it is a priority that people just seem to forget when they think of being responsible.

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