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  1. #51
    Junior Member Wistful Muffin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GarrotTheThief View Post
    I hear Dickens had an insane IQ and we used to read him a lot but even though he is great at writing I find his characters so horribly clitche as to be entirely unreal compared to let's say someone like Hermen Hesse who probably was not as good with details but more soulful.
    I haven't read any Hermann Hesse so I can't quite compare the writing styles.
    Apparently Dickens' IQ was 180.
    "To conceal anything from those to whom I am attached, is not in my nature. I can never close my lips where I have opened my heart."

    -Charles Dickens

  2. #52
    The Green Jolly Robin H.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wistful Muffin View Post
    I haven't read any Hermann Hesse so I can't quite compare the writing styles.
    Apparently Dickens' IQ was 180.
    Yeah really a high IQ and nearly perfrectly crafted language - just really somewhat stereotypical 1 dimensional characters he must have been a hermit because compared to Hermen Hesse his characters are like Dorthy from the Wizard of oz. I don't know the exact word for it but it's kind of like walking through a really complicated maze that's built like a city if that makes sense. You know it's not a city but the design is magnificent.

    Reading someone like Hermen Hesse though, or a similar author, appeals more to the soul.
    "i shut the door and in the morning
    it was open
    -the end"




    Olemn slammed his hammer and from the sparks on the metal of his anvil came the spheres of the heavens.

    Sayrah blew life into the spheres and they moved. From her wheel she weaved the names of people in to mystery.
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  3. #53
    not to be trusted miss fortune's Avatar
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    bradbury, borges and gaiman for the feel of what they write... something like a cool fall night in the hot tub with a good book

    pratchett and wodehouse for something more lighthearted

    and some of the best nights I've had were spent with decameron, 1001 nights and canterbury tales

    as for poetry, I've usually enjoyed a variety of things ranging from ballad of a white horse to the love song of j alfred prufrock

    yes... reading is fun
    “Oh, we're always alright. You remember that. We happen to other people.” -Terry Pratchett
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  4. #54
    Junior Member Wistful Muffin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GarrotTheThief View Post
    Yeah really a high IQ and nearly perfrectly crafted language - just really somewhat stereotypical 1 dimensional characters he must have been a hermit because compared to Hermen Hesse his characters are like Dorthy from the Wizard of oz. I don't know the exact word for it but it's kind of like walking through a really complicated maze that's built like a city if that makes sense. You know it's not a city but the design is magnificent.

    Reading someone like Hermen Hesse though, or a similar author, appeals more to the soul.
    I'll definitely look into his writing then
    Should be interesting.
    Is there anything by him in particular you'd recommend?
    "To conceal anything from those to whom I am attached, is not in my nature. I can never close my lips where I have opened my heart."

    -Charles Dickens
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  5. #55
    The Green Jolly Robin H.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wistful Muffin View Post
    I'll definitely look into his writing then
    Should be interesting.
    Is there anything by him in particular you'd recommend?
    Damien...I forget how it is spelled...and Narcissus and Goldmund, but Damien left a strong impression on me. You'll notice that many tropes in movies we watch today come directly from Hesse. We could even say that much of our modern art is based on Hesse, a sleeper foundation, but in truth Hesse is re appropriating much from a previous era. But he does a good job of building on where Faust left off with Mephistopheles, and modernizing it...his writings are considered vogue by some, but they are just really good experiences overall.
    "i shut the door and in the morning
    it was open
    -the end"




    Olemn slammed his hammer and from the sparks on the metal of his anvil came the spheres of the heavens.

    Sayrah blew life into the spheres and they moved. From her wheel she weaved the names of people in to mystery.
    Likes Wistful Muffin liked this post

  6. #56
    Senior Member Nicodemus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GarrotTheThief View Post
    Narcissus and Goldmund
    This one might be especially interesting to people here because Hesse drew on Jung's theories in developing the two main characters.

  7. #57
    The Green Jolly Robin H.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicodemus View Post
    This one might be especially interesting to people here because Hesse drew on Jung's theories in developing the two main characters.
    You've read it then? I just finished it last night. The last paragraph gave me chills in the same way that a good movie or prolific writing would.

    Do you think goldmun was a sensor intuitive feeler and narcissus a thinker sensor intuitive?

    That's why I think Hesse becomes vogue. Reading it is like a frantic rush through a room looking for an elixir one has lost and needs direly in the next few moments. His final words are like a hammer. He is never too intellectual nor sentimental. He is always in that sweet spot. His literature is like blues music before the electric guitar.
    "i shut the door and in the morning
    it was open
    -the end"




    Olemn slammed his hammer and from the sparks on the metal of his anvil came the spheres of the heavens.

    Sayrah blew life into the spheres and they moved. From her wheel she weaved the names of people in to mystery.

  8. #58
    Senior Member Nicodemus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GarrotTheThief View Post
    You've read it then? I just finished it last night. The last paragraph gave me chills in the same way that a good movie or prolific writing would.
    Yes, I read it, but I already forgot most of it again. I found the homoerotic elements touching, but most of the Jungian stuff and all the aesthetotheological musings are not my cup of tea, which is probably why the whole thing left me rather unimpressed and without strong memories. It struck me as a bit naive, too, as if it had been written by a young adult.

    A former teacher once recommended I read Beneath the Wheel. I never finished that; it bored me. That, however, is the extent of my Hesse experience. I have not been tempted to allot him much time since out last get-together.

    Quote Originally Posted by GarrotTheThief View Post
    Do you think goldmun was a sensor intuitive feeler and narcissus a thinker sensor intuitive?
    I think the roles, as far as thinking and sensing are concerned, are clear. More important than their particular types are their differences, their complementary dispositions. Goldmund is obsessed with his mother, Narcissus with god, male and female. One seeks earthly experience, the other metaphysical understanding. Archetypes, bla, bla, bla.

    Quote Originally Posted by GarrotTheThief View Post
    That's why I think Hesse becomes vogue. Reading it is like a frantic rush through a room looking for an elixir one has lost and needs direly in the next few moments. His final words are like a hammer. He is never too intellectual nor sentimental. He is always in that sweet spot. His literature is like blues music before the electric guitar.
    As far as I know, what made Hesse popular in the States (in the 60s!) were Steppenwolf and Siddhartha.

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  9. #59
    The Green Jolly Robin H.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicodemus View Post
    Yes, I read it, but I already forgot most of it again. I found the homoerotic elements touching, but most of the Jungian stuff and all the aesthetotheological musings are not my cup of tea, which is probably why the whole thing left me rather unimpressed and without strong memories. It struck me as a bit naive, too, as if it had been written by a young adult.

    A former teacher once recommended I read Beneath the Wheel. I never finished that; it bored me. That, however, is the extent of my Hesse experience. I have not been tempted to allot him much time since out last get-together.


    I think the roles, as far as thinking and sensing are concerned, are clear. More important than their particular types are their differences, their complementary dispositions. Goldmund is obsessed with his mother, Narcissus with god, male and female. One seeks earthly experience, the other metaphysical understanding. Archetypes, bla, bla, bla.


    As far as I know, what made Hesse popular in the States (in the 60s!) were Steppenwolf and Siddhartha.

    Thank you for that! I always grow when I hear another's point of view. Sometimes I get obsessed with something like a song or a book and when I hear a more neutral point of view it brings me down to earth.
    "i shut the door and in the morning
    it was open
    -the end"




    Olemn slammed his hammer and from the sparks on the metal of his anvil came the spheres of the heavens.

    Sayrah blew life into the spheres and they moved. From her wheel she weaved the names of people in to mystery.
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  10. #60
    Senior Member Nicodemus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GarrotTheThief View Post
    Thank you for that! I always grow when I hear another's point of view. Sometimes I get obsessed with something like a song or a book and when I hear a more neutral point of view it brings me down to earth.
    It is possible he is more intoxicating in English. Just not very likely.
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