User Tag List

View Poll Results: What Religion Do You Practice/Not Practice and Why?

Voters
131. You may not vote on this poll
  • I'm an atheist

    36 27.48%
  • I'm agnostic

    25 19.08%
  • Buddhism

    6 4.58%
  • Hinduism

    1 0.76%
  • Islam

    2 1.53%
  • Christianity

    39 29.77%
  • Other

    22 16.79%
First 38464748495058 Last

Results 471 to 480 of 590

  1. #471
    & Badger, Ratty and Toad Mole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    18,543

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 21lux View Post
    An interesting interpretation. I suppose you could say that there are times when the concept of religion does make me angry--not so much because of the ideology itself, but because of the people wielding it as a sword and shield to try and force it down others' throats. I can't recall any situation where someone got up close and personal with me and tried to force me to share their beliefs, however, so most of my belief in this regard stems from observation. As a child, my father was not religious, but my mother and grandmother were. However my mother rarely ever took me and my sister to church regularly (dad would never join) because she is quite lazy. I'm actually grateful for this. I don't mind if people want to be religious as long as they keep their religion away from me, but a part of me can't help but feel that religion is, in essence, brainwashing. I feel like I dodged a bullet by not becoming "indoctrinated" at a young age. I wouldn't say that I have a problem with god or even religion itself so much as some of the people practicing that religion and how most parents go about socializing children to believe what they believe and raise them in a religion rather than let the child discover what they believe for themselves.

    Perhaps this is where my fascination with autobiographies about women escaping the FLDS comes from.
    Religion can be very broad and can refer to anything we worship. And we worship all kinds of things, even established religions.

    And looking at the history of humanity, it would appear we have in instinct to worship. This would be a result of Natural Selection, and helped us to survive and reproduce.

    And your fascination with women escaping the Mormons perhaps illustrates the psychological power of established religions.

    Just as here we are fascinated by the psychological power of astrology and mbti.

    And we face the same problem as women and the Mormons, and that is, how to escape. How can we escape Mormonism, and how can we escape the much older astrology, and how can we escape the new guy on the block, mbti?

  2. #472
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    1,628

    Default

    I do not need religion. I worship my own gods of Logic and Reason. The words of Carl Sagan and Neil Degrasse Tyson are my holy scriptures. I dream of a world where males will no longer be oppressed by the evil fembots, where Doritos and Mountain Dew are our sole source of sustenance, where the only wars will be fought in World of Warcraft instead of over oil and outdated moral values.


    Today I make my stand.
    Today I spread my enlightenment.
    Likes Hive liked this post

  3. #473
    Senior Member Survive & Stay Free's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    MBTI
    ESTJ
    Enneagram
    9 so/sx
    Posts
    21,675

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Coriolis View Post
    Christianity has portrayed God as male for all intents and purposes. So, both male and female believers have been worshipping something essentially male.
    I think that's been a historical error which has been dispensed with.

  4. #474
    Analytical Dreamer Coriolis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    MBTI
    INTJ
    Enneagram
    5w6 sp/sx
    Posts
    17,586

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lark View Post
    I think that's been a historical error which has been dispensed with.
    How so? As a substitute church organist, I have the chance to see many denominations of Christianity. I have yet to find one that portrays God as other than male. What am I missing?
    I've been called a criminal, a terrorist, and a threat to the known universe. But everything you were told is a lie. The truth is, they've taken our freedom, our home, and our future. The time has come for all humanity to take a stand...

  5. #475
    Senior Member Survive & Stay Free's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    MBTI
    ESTJ
    Enneagram
    9 so/sx
    Posts
    21,675

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Coriolis View Post
    How so? As a substitute church organist, I have the chance to see many denominations of Christianity. I have yet to find one that portrays God as other than male. What am I missing?
    In my own experience the RCC does not "portray" God at all, you are hard pushed to find any of the traditional, father, son and the holy ghost iconography, definitely not in any of the modern churches and not for some time even if you go back historically, I visited Rome and Paris and went to the grandest RCC churches I could find and while there are depictions of Jesus, Mary, much more often saints, martyrs and the authors of the gospels, there isnt anything like God. There was one Church in Rome that I remember talking to my dad about iconography which we both suspected had a masonic appearence, it was the all seeing eye in the pyramid sort of thing, similar to that on the US dollar note and similar to that created by the eye between the sexton and the compass in masonry.

    The masculine was used to describe God when I was growing up and they did talk about the father, son and the holy ghost but I can honestly say there not a hint of patriarchy about it, unless you consider Don McLain's American Pie to be patriarchal too, or Johnny Cash, and I know there are people who do consider both to be but its not what I'd consider a mainstream audience of people, and I think the world is better for that to be honest.

    However, this is something which has been changing, I mean seriously changing, in recent years, when I was in Dublin, which was more than ten years ago, possibly fifthteen years ago the Jesuits, who are one of the main orders within the RCC, had already begun to use prayers and liturgy which were revisionist to remove all references to God as male or anything resembling an anthropomorphising projection what so ever. Its not something I'm on message with personally because I think a lot of what results is ugly and unrefined, insights into how limited language can be are great, also insights into how historically this was about the invisibility of women and the feminine are great too but I'm not sure that the legacy of those insights should be the eradication of the historical record and phrasing.

  6. #476
    Analytical Dreamer Coriolis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    MBTI
    INTJ
    Enneagram
    5w6 sp/sx
    Posts
    17,586

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lark View Post
    In my own experience the RCC does not "portray" God at all, you are hard pushed to find any of the traditional, father, son and the holy ghost iconography, definitely not in any of the modern churches and not for some time even if you go back historically, I visited Rome and Paris and went to the grandest RCC churches I could find and while there are depictions of Jesus, Mary, much more often saints, martyrs and the authors of the gospels, there isnt anything like God. There was one Church in Rome that I remember talking to my dad about iconography which we both suspected had a masonic appearence, it was the all seeing eye in the pyramid sort of thing, similar to that on the US dollar note and similar to that created by the eye between the sexton and the compass in masonry.

    The masculine was used to describe God when I was growing up and they did talk about the father, son and the holy ghost but I can honestly say there not a hint of patriarchy about it, unless you consider Don McLain's American Pie to be patriarchal too, or Johnny Cash, and I know there are people who do consider both to be but its not what I'd consider a mainstream audience of people, and I think the world is better for that to be honest.

    However, this is something which has been changing, I mean seriously changing, in recent years, when I was in Dublin, which was more than ten years ago, possibly fifthteen years ago the Jesuits, who are one of the main orders within the RCC, had already begun to use prayers and liturgy which were revisionist to remove all references to God as male or anything resembling an anthropomorphising projection what so ever. Its not something I'm on message with personally because I think a lot of what results is ugly and unrefined, insights into how limited language can be are great, also insights into how historically this was about the invisibility of women and the feminine are great too but I'm not sure that the legacy of those insights should be the eradication of the historical record and phrasing.
    Our experiences then are different. I was raised in the Catholic Church. Yes, our church also had statues and pictures of Mary and the saints, male and female, but it was emphasized that these individuals, however holy, were not God. Only the trinity was God. One part was firmly described as the Father - undeniably masculine, as was the Son in the flesh-and-blood person of Jesus. This left only the Holy Spirit for any possible association with the feminine. On rare occasion this association was made, also with the idea of wisdom (Sophia) from the OT, but mostly the Holy Spirit was referred to as masculine as well.

    All the acknowledgments of theologians at the academic level that God transcends gender as well as other human distinctions cannot make up for the day-to-day reality of having God consistently described with male terminology. And the situation is only worse in most Protestant denominations. At least we had Mary, and the lingering, almost instinctive sense, however directly contradicted by the Church, that she really is deific as well.
    I've been called a criminal, a terrorist, and a threat to the known universe. But everything you were told is a lie. The truth is, they've taken our freedom, our home, and our future. The time has come for all humanity to take a stand...

  7. #477
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    228

    Default

    Christian.

    I once encountered some Hare Krishna followers who gave me a pamphlet to read. Some time later I tried to find the pamphlet. I tried and tried, but it was nowhere to be found. While searching in a closet, I found a Bible I hadn't even realized was there. I decided I might as well try reading that. After reading the Beatitudes especially, I came to the conclusion that although I had been an atheist, I believed God was real. And I believed what Jesus was saying in those Beatitudes was real and true. Then I started putting the belief into action. Not long after that someone close to a college campus was witnessing to people. He said he was a Christian. I looked at him and said I was a Christian, too. I never felt like that before. All of these things happened years ago and I've never wavered in my beliefs, although I've certainly faced many obstacles in life just like many people do, no matter what they believe. Still, God can give a peace that passes all understanding.

    At first I think I was a quite selfish Christian. But when I finally realized the importance of the statement "it is more blessed to give than to receive," that's when the big transformations started taking place in my life.

  8. #478
    Senior Member Survive & Stay Free's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    MBTI
    ESTJ
    Enneagram
    9 so/sx
    Posts
    21,675

    Default

    Lately I've been wondering if its actually possible for individuals to practice the same religion.
    Likes Poki liked this post

  9. #479
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    MBTI
    STP
    Posts
    10,501

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lark View Post
    Lately I've been wondering if its actually possible for individuals to practice the same religion.
    Nah, we are to opinionated to all practice the same religion.
    Im out, its been fun

  10. #480
    Senior Member Survive & Stay Free's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    MBTI
    ESTJ
    Enneagram
    9 so/sx
    Posts
    21,675

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Poki View Post
    Nah, we are to opinionated to all practice the same religion.
    I think that whether or not a religion is accomodating of personal idiosyncracies or not there isnt any hive mind and it would be a bad thing is such a thing could exist.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 33
    Last Post: 05-04-2016, 05:39 AM
  2. Replies: 99
    Last Post: 04-05-2016, 08:17 AM
  3. What magazines do you subscribe to and why?
    By fidelia in forum The Bonfire
    Replies: 40
    Last Post: 07-15-2010, 01:01 PM
  4. [ENTP] ENTPs, how often do you cry, [if ever] and why?
    By Spry in forum The NT Rationale (ENTP, INTP, ENTJ, INTJ)
    Replies: 142
    Last Post: 09-03-2009, 11:06 AM
  5. What direction do you see the USA going in, and where would you like it to go?
    By Risen in forum Politics, History, and Current Events
    Replies: 74
    Last Post: 10-31-2008, 01:09 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO