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View Poll Results: What Religion Do You Practice/Not Practice and Why?

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  • I'm an atheist

    36 27.48%
  • I'm agnostic

    25 19.08%
  • Buddhism

    6 4.58%
  • Hinduism

    1 0.76%
  • Islam

    2 1.53%
  • Christianity

    39 29.77%
  • Other

    22 16.79%
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Results 251 to 260 of 590

  1. #251
    Senior Member Survive & Stay Free's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coriolis View Post
    Is it better for scientists to be the subject of ridicule rather than suspicion?

    Science is nothing more than a methodical approach to understanding the natural world, intended to allow repeatible prediction of or influence over future events. Though modern formulations of the "scientific method" are - well - modern, humans have been doing this one way or another since we have existed. It is part of human nature.
    I'm not sure about your question, I dont believe superstition is a good thing, I actually see religion as an alternative to superstition though so we may differ on that point, it depends on your view of religion I guess.

    As to whether or not scientists be subject to ridicule, I dont think that would be helpful to anyone, why do you suggest that? And why is it matter that you either have superstition or ridiculous science? That sounds like the choice of no choice really.

    I think that science does indeed comprise methodology but it also involves a philosophy, ie that things can be knowable in the first place, that there is something to know, that there is a reason to know, that there is objective truth and it is knowable and then a lot of myriad things which follow from all that as first principles.

    Maybe that is human nature and maybe it isnt, there is an argument to be made that a lot of cognition and consciousness is compensatory, ie that drives being obstructed or channelled differently by external events, ie war, famine, contest, defeat, victory etc. resulted the growth of cultural explanation, story telling and narrative. If everyone had been able to live without any challenges compelling growth then we would still be idyllic herd animals of a lesser nature than we are today, its one other literary or not literal interpretation of the Genesis story as leaving this paradisical early state, perhaps a "fool's paradise" but a paradise all the same.

  2. #252
    Member Eska's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lark View Post
    Why would the product of human experience, interpretation and understanding be anything other than a precisely that?

    A human, all too human product.

    Science doesnt possess the sort of internal consistency that you are suggesting religion should, certainly not over historical time and science does not possess anything like the time line of religion which has existed from very beginnings of human consciousness, in fact playing an important role as a driver in the development of human consciousness itself.

    Any history of science which is not going to be merely a set of simplistic or reductive observations about research methodology, ie testable, falsifiable hypothesis as theorising, is going to include things such as phrenology, mesmerism, animal magneticism etc.

    Part of this is the myopic and blinkered contrasting of good science or good atheism versus bad religion which is unfair at the very, very best but I also think it is a consequence of vogues and fashions in thinking, virtually any and all suspicions of science has disappeared from contemporary society. Mad science or mad scientists are in the popular imagination the endearing and quirky Sheldon Cooper type and not some terrible Dr Mengele or human caterpillar type.
    I think you quoted the wrong user.

    If not, I don't know what you're referring to or/and what your point is.

  3. #253
    Analytical Dreamer Coriolis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lark View Post
    I'm not sure about your question, I dont believe superstition is a good thing, I actually see religion as an alternative to superstition though so we may differ on that point, it depends on your view of religion I guess.

    As to whether or not scientists be subject to ridicule, I dont think that would be helpful to anyone, why do you suggest that? And why is it matter that you either have superstition or ridiculous science? That sounds like the choice of no choice really.

    I think that science does indeed comprise methodology but it also involves a philosophy, ie that things can be knowable in the first place, that there is something to know, that there is a reason to know, that there is objective truth and it is knowable and then a lot of myriad things which follow from all that as first principles.

    Maybe that is human nature and maybe it isnt, there is an argument to be made that a lot of cognition and consciousness is compensatory, ie that drives being obstructed or channelled differently by external events, ie war, famine, contest, defeat, victory etc. resulted the growth of cultural explanation, story telling and narrative. If everyone had been able to live without any challenges compelling growth then we would still be idyllic herd animals of a lesser nature than we are today, its one other literary or not literal interpretation of the Genesis story as leaving this paradisical early state, perhaps a "fool's paradise" but a paradise all the same.
    Would the highlighted have been a better situation for humanity?

    I don't know why you are mentioning superstition. Science has always stood in opposition to superstition. Religion may claim to be an alternative, but it has no more predictive value in the natural world than supersitition does. Superstitions sometimes did turn out to have a basis in actual cause and effect relationships. In these cases they were really rudimentary empiricism rather than true superstition.

    As for ridicule, you contrasted suspicion of scientists with their prominent role in a modern sitcom. Such caricatured portrayals do nothing to improve public understanding of who scientists are and what we really do.
    I've been called a criminal, a terrorist, and a threat to the known universe. But everything you were told is a lie. The truth is, they've taken our freedom, our home, and our future. The time has come for all humanity to take a stand...

  4. #254
    Junior Member kingkelb's Avatar
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    I'm an atheist, though I went to a Christian school and have many friends of other faiths so I think I know enough about religion to discuss it. I realise that other people are religious but I will not silence my lack of belief out of 'respect' for their belief.

    Marx said it well that religion is the 'sigh of the oppressed creature' -people look to religion for hope that even if their life is shit now, maybe if they follow a load of rules now, after they die it will be better. So many religious beliefs and theories have been proven incorrect by modern technology. Creationists fighting to keep teaching about evolution out of schools are lying and impeding progress. Hopefully one day everyone will be educated well in the true facts of the universe and religion will die out. Every surge of scientific discovery is suppressed by religion and it has contributed to many problems facing the world today- sexism, homophobia etc. Plus the amount of religiously-justified wars and attacks.

    Although it can help some with moral guidance, people should decide for themselves instead of blindly following rules (which has never helped anything) If the only thing stopping someone from raping is the idea of hell, rather than not wanting to hurt someone in that way, is that good? ...

  5. #255
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    Quote Originally Posted by kingkelb View Post
    I'm an atheist, though I went to a Christian school and have many friends of other faiths so I think I know enough about religion to discuss it. I realise that other people are religious but I will not silence my lack of belief out of 'respect' for their belief.

    Marx said it well that religion is the 'sigh of the oppressed creature' -people look to religion for hope that even if their life is shit now, maybe if they follow a load of rules now, after they die it will be better. So many religious beliefs and theories have been proven incorrect by modern technology. Creationists fighting to keep teaching about evolution out of schools are lying and impeding progress. Hopefully one day everyone will be educated well in the true facts of the universe and religion will die out. Every surge of scientific discovery is suppressed by religion and it has contributed to many problems facing the world today- sexism, homophobia etc. Plus the amount of religiously-justified wars and attacks.

    Although it can help some with moral guidance, people should decide for themselves instead of blindly following rules (which has never helped anything) If the only thing stopping someone from raping is the idea of hell, rather than not wanting to hurt someone in that way, is that good? ...
    Certainly mystical experience within a religion is a real experience.

    And almost all religions have a mystical tradition.

    The question is can we disentangle mystical experience from religion? And the answer is yes. And a start has been made with the book Spirituality Without Religion by Sam Harris.

    We have such a rich history of mystical experience going back tens of thousands of years and codified by religion.

    And we have a long history of religious mystics to draw from. There is no need for us to invent the wheel all the time, many great mystics have trod the path before us, and left us help and advice and a map for the mystical journey.

    So perhaps we should be grateful to religion for preserving and codifying mystical experience, and now we can take mystical experience into our own hands.

    Just as the monks in their scriptoriums preserved and codified the riches of Ancient Greece for us to enjoy and develop today, so religion had preserved and codified mystical experience for us to enjoy and develop in today's world.

  6. #256
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    “I have grown tired of the articulate utterances of men and things. The Mystical in Art, the Mystical in Life, the Mystical in Nature this is what I am looking for. It is absolutely necessary for me to find it somewhere.” Oscar Wilde
    Likes Qlip, Mole liked this post

  7. #257
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    Quote Originally Posted by Evee View Post
    “I have grown tired of the articulate utterances of men and things. The Mystical in Art, the Mystical in Life, the Mystical in Nature this is what I am looking for. It is absolutely necessary for me to find it somewhere.” Oscar Wilde
    I like the mystical chapter in, The Wind in the Willows. To read it just click on The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame: Ch. The Piper at the Gates of Dawn

  8. #258
    Senior Member riva's Avatar
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    Where there is suffering (poverty, oppression, destruction, unjust, corruption etc) religions thrives.

    Where there is bliss (abundance, joy and security) philosophy/science thrives.

    This is why there are more religious people in under developed areas of the world; where as well to do areas tend to be less religious. I am not saying that the less religious places are atheist but they seldom care about religious obligations and adherence or even prayer.

    I think statistics will prove my point.
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  9. #259
    Senior Member riva's Avatar
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    @Coriolis, @Evee, @Fluffywolf, @kyuuei, @msg_v2

    Please tell me what other gods you worship. Don't bore me by saying that you are an agnostic. Please accept my apologies if you have already mentioned this and I have missed it.
    .

  10. #260
    Nips away your dignity Fluffywolf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by riva View Post
    @Coriolis, @Evee, @Fluffywolf, @kyuuei, @msg_v2

    Please tell me what other gods you worship. Don't bore me by saying that you are an agnostic. Please accept my apologies if you have already mentioned this and I have missed it.
    Processing personal value for the idea of theistic or non theistic beliefs...

    ...Processing complete.

    Output: 0

    (Though the term is technically an oxymoron, I would best be described as an apatheist as I've stated numerous times on the forum.)
    ~Self-depricating Megalomaniacal Superwolf

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