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View Poll Results: Which support system for your post privatised school?

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  • Charity

    3 8.82%
  • Corporate

    10 29.41%
  • Religious

    7 20.59%
  • I don't know/I love government control of education

    14 41.18%
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Results 41 to 50 of 157

  1. #41
    Order Now! pure_mercury's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jasz View Post
    i don't see a lot of difference between charity/corporate/religious support. they are all special interest groups with agendas.
    So are public school unions.
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  2. #42
    Oberon
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    Quote Originally Posted by ajblaise View Post
    Without public funding the burden remains on the parents, corporate and charity schools don't exist and probably never could on a large scale.
    How is it that public funding makes corporate education... i.e. for-profit private schools... possible? Just FYI, that's the business model the first schools followed, the one under which Plato was taught. Once upon a time, ALL schools were private schools.

    And from the middle ages up to today in the west, there is a long and distinguished history of charity schools, for example orphanage schools operated by the Catholic church, and the ones run by George Müller in 19th-century England. Such schools provide quality education to people who need it today, now, this morning, without public funding.

  3. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by murkrow View Post
    Kids don't get socialized if they are home schooled, also it's a big burden on the parents.
    I don't think everyone should be home schooled. But it definitely seems to work out for some people (I've known lots of homeschoolers) The lack of socialization idea is a myth and a cliche and it doesn't have to be a big burden if one of the parents stays at home and they actually want to do it.

    I think school should be completely privatized. But like Lee said, that doesn't have to mean just one form or the other.
    I don't wanna!

  4. #44
    Oberon
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    Quote Originally Posted by murkrow View Post
    Kids don't get socialized if they are home schooled...
    My wife and I were concerned about our kids missing the socialization offered by public school too. So, once a week we shove our kids into the bathroom, rough them up, steal their lunch money, curse at them, and offer them drugs, and that pretty much takes care of it.

    Between ballet camp, church activities, homeschool association functions, overnighters, trips to the mall and play dates, I'm not sure how much more of this sheltered isolation I can stand.

  5. #45
    Senior Member Enyo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by oberon View Post
    My wife and I were concerned about our kids missing the socialization offered by public school too. So, once a week we shove our kids into the bathroom, rough them up, steal their lunch money, curse at them, and offer them drugs, and that pretty much takes care of it.

    Between ballet camp, church activities, homeschool association functions, overnighters, trips to the mall and play dates, I'm not sure how much more of this sheltered isolation I can stand.
    You know, except for the cursing and drugs, it doesn't sound like my public school experience.

    I actually contemplated homeschooling my ENTP child (or at least, he seems to be, based on the test and profile that I took online) but we make each other nuts. Plus, I wouldn't get him the socialization that he needs.

    So he went back to Florida, where there's a better education system than in BC, and the climate and culture are more to his liking. Had he stayed in BC much longer, though, he would have been homeschooled. He wasn't academically challenged, so he was bored and disruptive. Homogenized education doesn't work for gifted children; he can't handle being taught to the lowest common denominator.

    I'd have preferred a Jesuit school for him over anything, but there's no Jesuit school for hours of where I live in BC, and my family in Florida isn't willing to ferry him a couple of hours to a good Jesuit school.

    At least he attends an A school by Florida testing standards.
    "If you can't be a good example, you'll just have to serve as a horrible warning." Catherine Aird

  6. #46
    Glowy Goopy Goodness The_Liquid_Laser's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by oberon View Post
    In many districts, that fraction is getting no education now.
    Yeah those are the districts I'd be worried about. Without public education you should expect 90%+ to go without education in the poorest areas.
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  7. #47
    Senior Member reason's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The_Liquid_Laser View Post
    Yeah those are the districts I'd be worried about. Without public education you should expect 90%+ to go without education in the poorest areas.
    Why should anyone expect that? The school attendence rates hardly change when governments abolish private education and establish a monopoly, even when the government makes attendence mandatory. From my recollection of what I have heard and read on the issue, education is not something which is underconsumed, even by the poor. Moreover, privately run schools tend to produce better results with far lower costs, which helps make education more affordable, not less.
    A criticism that can be brought against everything ought not to be brought against anything.

  8. #48
    Minister of Propagandhi ajblaise's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by murkrow View Post
    Why not?

    Without the burden of taxation the population would have much more free capitol to invest in charities they feel ideological connections to.

    Corporations certainly have enough money, especially since it would guarantee them a well trained workforce.
    I don't think ending education taxation would free up enough money to educate the whole nation, even if 100% of the money saved went to charities. Charity education sounds like something we should be using to help starving African kids.

    And with corporations, why would they want to spend all that money education kids from ages 5 to 18 just to get employees? They already get employees without spending millions on the potential workforce.

    Most jobs only require a week for or so of on-the-job training, not 13 years.

  9. #49
    Minister of Propagandhi ajblaise's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by reason View Post
    Why should anyone expect that? The school attendence rates hardly change when governments abolish private education and establish a monopoly, even when the government makes attendence mandatory. From my recollection of what I have heard and read on the issue, education is not something which is underconsumed, even by the poor. Moreover, privately run schools tend to produce better results with far lower costs, which helps make education more affordable, not less.
    Poor and lower-middle class families can't afford $13,000 per kid to go to school. It's as simple as that, of course attendance rates would drop.

  10. #50
    Branded with Satan murkrow's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ajblaise View Post
    I don't think ending education taxation would free up enough money to educate the whole nation, even if 100% of the money saved went to charities. Charity education sounds like something we should be using to help starving African kids.

    And with corporations, why would they want to spend all that money education kids from ages 5 to 18 just to get employees? They already get employees without spending millions on the potential workforce.

    Most jobs only require a week for or so of on-the-job training, not 13 years.
    Were there no publicly funded schools the business world would have no choice but to create their own.

    I have no problem moving the burden from the workers to the corporations.
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