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View Poll Results: Does philosphy often matter to real world actions?

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  • Yes, often

    11 78.57%
  • Usually not

    3 21.43%
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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by AffirmitiveAnxiety View Post
    I suppose I was thinking of the idea that everyone is, at some level, a philsopher.
    Most of us are anti-philosophers.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by ygolo View Post
    Other than a declaration by you that being rejected and marginalized is a requirement for being a philosopher, what basis do we have for such dichotomies?
    We perceive by making distinctions. And the more distinctions, the more we see. So the distinction philosopher/ideologue is like a torch beam on a dark night.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by ygolo View Post
    That was a masterful removal of context.
    Almost always we take context for granted. Philosophy looks at context, and speaks the language of context. And as we change the contexts, we change the meaning of the text.

    Naturally this is disorientating and confusing. However confusion is a sign learning is taking place.

  4. #24
    Entertaining Cracker five sounds's Avatar
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    one of my main goals in life is to be firm in what i believe and to make my actions consistent with it. so my personal answer to this question is: as often as possible.
    You hem me in -- behind and before;
    you have laid your hand upon me.
    Such knowledge is too wonderful for me,
    too lofty for me to attain.

  5. #25
    Emperor/Dictator kyuuei's Avatar
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    Philosophy is potentially everything.

    There are limits. For example, lack of self-awareness, denial, inability to change, and other natural factors can impede things.

    But take, for example, random made up Sociopath Joe. Joe's his last name. Sociopath Joe does not actively think on the world. He does not have an opinion on what should be right or wrong. He doesn't care about other people, or their feelings, or how his actions influence those around him. If he wants to stab that lady for wearing a pink hat because he decides to hate pink that day, then that's just what will happen and he won't lose a wink of sleep over it. He doesn't have a philosophy in his heart or mind, and chaos leads the way, so he's eating bagel bites out of his bathtub while watching porn on his phone that he stole from some 16 year old boy that lives next door using the boy's mom's credit card.

    But most of us are NOT Sociopath Joe. Most of us have principles that guide us. Things we grew up with, that we decided ourselves, that we experienced. We have a philosophy--whether we put it into clear words and terms or not. Most of us have taken a situation in our lives--like when we see someone called a bad name in school--and studied it, and tried to work a way into a solution. That solution is different for everyone: calling the name caller out, giving support to the person being called a bad name, resolving not to do it ourselves, resolving that the guy getting his name called deserves it, helping the name caller out, etc. But we all saw a potential problem or experienced it, studied it, and usually we come up with some sort of philosophy as a result.

    Most philosophies are flimsy and don't get much credit and honor. Like, "I think eating right is healthy and best. But I don't always do it." Even when we really like an idea and solution, and study it often, we're less likely to make it a strict disciplined principle.

    But for some, philosophies are a way of life, and we strive hard to find principles that define us--or that we want to define us--and find ways to beat those into every action we take. Like Honor, and leadership, confidence, kindness, and selfless service. These are hard to define, and require constantly meditating on them, analyzing actions in the past, rehashing events and working the problems in our head like math equations, trying to re-engineer the situation until we have answers that will satisfy for the next time the issue comes up.

    I'm at that stage in my life where I'm putting my philosophies into words, reconciling with the past when I was in denial and lacked the self awareness I currently possess, and translating those words into actions. It's an interesting experience, and I don't have all the words yet. But I will soon I believe.
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  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by five sounds View Post
    one of my main goals in life is to be firm in what i believe and to make my actions consistent with it.
    In order to learn we need to examine what we believe. And concommitently we need to disengage our actions from our beliefs.

    Consider: the first mistake of amateur propagandists is to believe our own propaganda. Amateur poets want our love poetry to come true. Ideologues want our ideology to come true, and you want to make your actions consistent with your beliefs.

    How can I protect you from yourself?

    When I come home at night, I find I am alone with the most dangerous person in the world: myself.

  7. #27
    Senior Member BlackDog's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mole View Post
    Quite so.

    And the followers of King Arthur are following in the footsteps of the good people of Athens who put our first philosopher, Socrates, to death.

    And this is our tragedy, as the best of Western culture stems from Socrates.
    This must surely be a misconception. Socrates tried to bring about the end of civilization by advocating for a dictatorship of philosophers along the lines of Brave New World. Fortunately he and his disciple Plato were prevented from gaining power.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by LION4!5 View Post
    This must surely be a misconception. Socrates tried to bring about the end of civilization by advocating for a dictatorship of philosophers along the lines of Brave New World. Fortunately he and his disciple Plato were prevented from gaining power.
    God forbid that I should contradict the Lion King, but I believe it was Plato's Republic that talked about philosopher kings; on the other hand Socrates did not seek power, rather he taught us how to think.
    Likes BlackDog liked this post

  9. #29
    Senior Member BlackDog's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mole View Post
    God forbid that I should contradict the Lion King, but I believe it was Plato's Republic that talked about philosopher kings; on the other hand Socrates did not seek power, rather he taught us how to think.
    But using the slippery slope argument I can demonstrate that the corruption of Socrates' methods of thinking led to the ultimate corruption of Plato.

    Using a valid argument, I can demonstrate that Plato and Socrates' philosophies cannot be distinguished because Plato doctored all of the publications. Because Socrates never wrote anything down.

    Using an ad hominem argument, I can demonstrate that Socrates married an underage girl when he was an old man just to have kids.

    These three prove my point irrefutably.

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by LION4!5 View Post
    But using the slippery slope argument I can demonstrate that the corruption of Socrates' methods of thinking led to the ultimate corruption of Plato.

    Using a valid argument, I can demonstrate that Plato and Socrates' philosophies cannot be distinguished because Plato doctored all of the publications. Because Socrates never wrote anything down.

    Using an ad hominem argument, I can demonstrate that Socrates married an underage girl when he was an old man just to have kids.

    These three prove my point irrefutably.
    I admit you are very difficult to refute.
    Likes BlackDog liked this post

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