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Thread: Zombies and Sin

  1. #11
    @.~*virinaĉo*~.@ Totenkindly's Avatar
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    As an interesting similar question, a friend and I have discussed over the years how one might reconcile being a vampire if one was a Christian. What would be an ethical course of action for the vampire in question?

    (And if you look at all the vampire mythology and symbolism, it's kind of "anti-Christ" -- it's all a backwards twist on Christian virtues, communion, the meaning of blood, etc.)
    "Hey Capa -- We're only stardust." ~ "Sunshine"

    “Pleasure to me is wonder—the unexplored, the unexpected, the thing that is hidden and the changeless thing that lurks behind superficial mutability. To trace the remote in the immediate; the eternal in the ephemeral; the past in the present; the infinite in the finite; these are to me the springs of delight and beauty.” ~ H.P. Lovecraft

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jennifer View Post
    As an interesting similar question, a friend and I have discussed over the years how one might reconcile being a vampire if one was a Christian. What would be an ethical course of action for the vampire in question?

    (And if you look at all the vampire mythology and symbolism, it's kind of "anti-Christ" -- it's all a backwards twist on Christian virtues, communion, the meaning of blood, etc.)
    Very interesting and quite paradoxical too. When I think about a Christian vampire, the first thing comes to mind is the alkaline metals, they combust with water, so will vampires and churches, bibles, crucifixes, holy water and stakes. ^^
    "sidere mens eadem mutato"

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    @.~*virinaĉo*~.@ Totenkindly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Avalon View Post
    Very interesting and quite paradoxical too. When I think about a Christian vampire, the first thing comes to mind is the alkaline metals, they combust with water, so will vampires and churches, bibles, crucifixes, holy water and stakes. ^^
    Well, we were thinking more about the moral dilemma of being turned into a vampire if you are a Christian.

    What is the appropriate moral response?
    To live, you must suck the blood of the living, preying on the innocent.
    If you don't, you'll die.

    Is suicide a morally justifiable alternative to an existence as a creature bound by instincts and rules that would drive it to consume others to promote its own longevity?
    "Hey Capa -- We're only stardust." ~ "Sunshine"

    “Pleasure to me is wonder—the unexplored, the unexpected, the thing that is hidden and the changeless thing that lurks behind superficial mutability. To trace the remote in the immediate; the eternal in the ephemeral; the past in the present; the infinite in the finite; these are to me the springs of delight and beauty.” ~ H.P. Lovecraft

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    Member Avalon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jennifer View Post
    Well, we were thinking more about the moral dilemma of being turned into a vampire if you are a Christian.

    What is the appropriate moral response?
    To live, you must suck the blood of the living, preying on the innocent.
    If you don't, you'll die.

    Is suicide a morally justifiable alternative to an existence as a creature bound by instincts and rules that would drive it to consume others to promote its own longevity?
    Perhaps the thirst for blood might override such a vampire's morality and it might feed. It's the same way when a person's existence is threatened, they become unstable and panicky and will do anything in that state of mind to promote their own longevity. But perhaps a dedicated Christian vampire will do the right thing and chose its own destruction, because of its inability to exist as a monster which endangers human.
    "sidere mens eadem mutato"

  5. #15
    Ginkgo
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    In most works of fiction, it seems like zombies lose their self-awareness. They operate purely on instinct. I don't think it would count as a "sin" to kill them, though it would feel a bit foul. If I lived in a zombie apocalypse, I would eventually become enthusiastic about the prospect of purging the world of undead so that humanity may once again claim its place in the world. However, if all human beings turned into zombies postmortem even when not bitten... the circumstances would be bleaker, and I could sympathize with the idea that zombies retain some of their humanity in the scenario. I'm not sure why. My best guess is that since they would be indomitable products of irreversible fate, more respect would be due.

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    The Torah says, "If a man comes to kill you, rise early and kill him first"
    That's fucking metal. \m/

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    78% me Eruca's Avatar
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    I agree with Ginkgo that even in cases of infection rather than more (mystical) reanimation, zombies appear to be living on pure instinct and do not posses consciousness. It would seem no small step to say a zombie might have the intelligence of, say, a dog, while being considerably more aggressive and dangerous if even only in potential. We would put rapid dogs down, and unfortunately (to put any emotive notions such a comparison might evoke aside) zombies would be very similar. There is no such thing as a human essence save for what is essential, and what is essential is merely what cannot be changed without a great change in object (paragidm shift, so to speak). Of course, zombies wouldnt need to merely not be human or to be considered as not human, they would also need to not be considered people; as we can imagine a universe in which another species had evolved or been created by god to have consciousness similar, but not identical, to our own. Consciousnesses is an essential trait we demand of people to be considered people, then. Therefore zombies lose human, people, rights.

    Of course, all this goes out the window if we are to take a the strong view that any creature capable of suffering (for example) has extended rights to not be harmed. Care to defend the zombie hordes, @Amargith ?

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    The High Priestess Amargith's Avatar
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    Nope. I'd consider it a merciful act of euthanasia to put them out of their suffering - provided we don't have a cure. And even then - the trauma of the disease might be too much to bear psychologically to consider the recovery successful.

    I'm not against killing - I'm against chronic, meaningless suffering.

    Death is a friend we all will meet in the end.
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  8. #18

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    I'm not going to try to answer this from a religious perspective, but I think it depends on a few things: are they capable of suffering, or are they completely unconscious? If they are conscious at all, do they have any quality of life? Is it a permanent state or is there any way to help them? If they're in constant suffering and there's no way to help them, killing them would probably be the most merciful/compassionate thing to do. But maybe what you're asking is, if they're going around killing/eating people, is it ok to kill them to save the lives of their potential victims? And I'd say again, if they're not conscious, if it's the only way to stop them and the effects of the virus can't be reversed, it's a definite yes for me. If they are conscious, it gets more complicated because that brings up the issue of whether they have any free will. If they're mindless, I assume you mean to imply they don't, and that would mean they can't be held responsible for their actions. Still, killing them might be the only way. But wouldn't it be a greater sin to create this virus in the first place?

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