User Tag List

First 23456 Last

Results 31 to 40 of 64

  1. #31
    Tenured roisterer SolitaryWalker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    MBTI
    INTP
    Enneagram
    5w6 so/sx
    Posts
    3,467

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ThatsWhatHeSaid View Post
    It's not a terrible hypothesis, but there's a major snag: people who seek refuge in their contemplation as a means of avoiding their emotions are not at peace at all. They're just as much a victim of their emotions as someone who follows them, except that their minds are consumed with escape instead of pursuit.
    Contemplation allows you to reduce the emotional content to deal with. In order to tame them you still need to work through them. This is easier to achieve in contemplation for two reasons. The aforementioned reduced content and a peaceful environment to deal with them in.
    "Do not argue with an idiot. They drag you down to their level and beat you with experience." -- Mark Twain

    “No man but a blockhead ever wrote, except for money.”---Samuel Johnson

    My blog: www.randommeanderings123.blogspot.com/

  2. #32
    Senior Member ThatsWhatHeSaid's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    MBTI
    INTP
    Enneagram
    5w4
    Posts
    7,233

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BlueWing View Post
    Contemplation allows you to reduce the emotional content to deal with. In order to tame them you still need to work through them. This is easier to achieve in contemplation for two reasons. The aforementioned reduced content and a peaceful environment to deal with them in.
    I would agree, as long as "working through them" implies opening up to the full experience and not trying to hide in one's thoughts. There's a tendency in people (especially analytical people) to intellectualize the experiences that they find difficult, to retreat into a world of classifying events and personalities (say, for example, using MBTI) and organize those classifications into some type of order in order to create an illusion of control and to distance the subject from the experience. I'm not sure what your idea of contemplation is, but I wonder if you're guilty of conflating "dispassionate contemplation" with intellectualization.

  3. #33
    Tenured roisterer SolitaryWalker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    MBTI
    INTP
    Enneagram
    5w6 so/sx
    Posts
    3,467

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ThatsWhatHeSaid View Post
    I would agree, as long as "working through them" implies opening up to the full experience and not trying to hide in one's thoughts. There's a tendency in people (especially analytical people) to intellectualize the experiences that they find difficult, to retreat into a world of classifying events and personalities (say, for example, using MBTI) and organize those classifications into some type of order in order to create an illusion of control and to distance the subject from the experience. I'm not sure what your idea of contemplation is, but I wonder if you're guilty of conflating "dispassionate contemplation" with intellectualization.
    Pure contemplation won't do because there is a need to process emotion to some degree. Opening up to experiences is the most reliable way to accomplish this. It should be noted however, that this is auxiliary to the intellectual understanding of your purpose concerning processing emotion. First you need to understand the situation you're dealing with, with great clarity, and secondly you need to know exactly what you're doing when you're opening up, as otherwise you shall be easily carried off track by a whirlwind of activities in the external world.
    "Do not argue with an idiot. They drag you down to their level and beat you with experience." -- Mark Twain

    “No man but a blockhead ever wrote, except for money.”---Samuel Johnson

    My blog: www.randommeanderings123.blogspot.com/

  4. #34
    Senior Member ThatsWhatHeSaid's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    MBTI
    INTP
    Enneagram
    5w4
    Posts
    7,233

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BlueWing View Post
    Pure contemplation won't do because there is a need to process emotion to some degree. Opening up to experiences is the most reliable way to accomplish this. It should be noted however, that this is auxiliary to the intellectual understanding of your purpose concerning processing emotion. First you need to understand the situation you're dealing with, with great clarity, and secondly you need to know exactly what you're doing when you're opening up, as otherwise you shall be easily carried off track by a whirlwind of activities in the external world.
    Would you agree that villianizing emotions would be counter-productive, in that it would make it more challenging to process a feeling without trying to escape it or create stories about it, or as you put it, getting carried off track?

  5. #35
    Tenured roisterer SolitaryWalker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    MBTI
    INTP
    Enneagram
    5w6 so/sx
    Posts
    3,467

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ThatsWhatHeSaid View Post
    Would you agree that villianizing emotions would be counter-productive, in that it would make it more challenging to process a feeling without trying to escape it or create stories about it, or as you put it, getting carried off track?
    It would be less productive to complete repress than to allow yourself to process slowly, but not even less so than allowing yourself to be carried away. Hell knows what you may be putting yourself through in the case of the latter. With the former, just a few bumps on the road because of lack of emotional intelligence. Nothing is more counter productive than loosing control.
    "Do not argue with an idiot. They drag you down to their level and beat you with experience." -- Mark Twain

    “No man but a blockhead ever wrote, except for money.”---Samuel Johnson

    My blog: www.randommeanderings123.blogspot.com/

  6. #36
    Senior Member ThatsWhatHeSaid's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    MBTI
    INTP
    Enneagram
    5w4
    Posts
    7,233

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BlueWing View Post
    It would be less productive to complete repress than to allow yourself to process slowly, but not even less so than allowing yourself to be carried away. Hell knows what you may be putting yourself through in the case of the latter. With the former, just a few bumps on the road because of lack of emotional intelligence. Nothing is more counter productive than loosing control.
    I don't think you really appreciate what dispassionate contemplation is if you say things like "nothing is more counter productive than losing control." Your struggle to gain control is just another one of the feelings you seek to uproot, in this case, your aversion to emotions and that suffering they cause. There's a saying in Zen that the best way to control a herd is a build a big fence. Trying to control your feelings is not how you overcome them; that's not "dispassionate" at all, it's complete immersion.

  7. #37
    Don't pet me. JAVO's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    6,052

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BlueWing View Post
    It is better to stay moderately excited for a long period of time than attempt to seek great excitement. Doing the latter will lead to an emotional instability, as it is difficult to maintain a high level of excitement consistently.
    Quote Originally Posted by BlueWing View Post
    The reason I gave was that it is difficult to maintain a high pace consistently. Compare running a marathon at 3 miles per hour consistently to running at 6 miles.
    So your argument is that if something is difficult, it is best not to do it?

    Plus, that still doesn't explain how prolonged excitement produces emotional instability. Maybe prolonged excitement just produces a desire for more sleep?

    Psychological research might have something to say about these speculations.

  8. #38
    & Badger, Ratty and Toad Mole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    18,543

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by heart View Post
    Do you mean like the supersensual? Your inner world? Or do you mean supernautural: Channeling spirits or astral type experiences?
    There has never been a civilization not based on a religion. And another name of the religion of a civilization is the Mythos of that civilization.

    And the Mythos is the meaning of a civilization.

    And you might further say that the Mythos is our heritage.

    So to answer your questions - I don't mean the supersensual, I mean the supernatural. And within our Mythos, channeling spirits or astral type experiences are simply trivial.

    For instance, Ancient Greece was founded on the Ancient Greek religion of Aphrodite, Apollo, Poseidon, Zeus and others.

    While interestingly the religion of our civilization is based on Judaism and Ancient Greek philosophy. And it is within this religion we are introduced to the supernatural.

  9. #39
    & Badger, Ratty and Toad Mole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    18,543

    Default Magic or life?

    Quote Originally Posted by colmena View Post
    It's true, he is a god from another world - he has supernatural powers - he is superman.

    And he is in a long line of the supernatural - from Poseidon to the Angel Gabriel.

    But I am leaving behind the four magic letters of MBTI and discovering the four letters of DNA.

    MBTI is simply magic created by the magician Carl Jung.

    While the four letters of DNA were discovered by Watson and Crick.

    The four letters of MBTI are a magic code while the four letters of DNA are the code of life.

    So you takes your choice - magic or life?

  10. #40
    Tenured roisterer SolitaryWalker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    MBTI
    INTP
    Enneagram
    5w6 so/sx
    Posts
    3,467

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JAVO View Post
    So your argument is that if something is difficult, it is best not to do it?

    Plus, that still doesn't explain how prolonged excitement produces emotional instability. Maybe prolonged excitement just produces a desire for more sleep?

    Psychological research might have something to say about these speculations.
    The point was to maintain consistency. Running a marathon at 3 miles an hour, you'll finish faster than at 6 miles an hour.
    "Do not argue with an idiot. They drag you down to their level and beat you with experience." -- Mark Twain

    “No man but a blockhead ever wrote, except for money.”---Samuel Johnson

    My blog: www.randommeanderings123.blogspot.com/

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 3
    Last Post: 07-16-2013, 01:10 PM
  2. The temptation of Se and how it relates to archetypical people
    By Venom in forum Myers-Briggs and Jungian Cognitive Functions
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 07-03-2011, 04:40 AM
  3. Are there tests as good as MBTI but not related to it?
    By hommefatal in forum Online Personality Tests
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 06-17-2009, 07:17 AM
  4. Forward thinking - and how it relates to type?
    By TenebrousReflection in forum Myers-Briggs and Jungian Cognitive Functions
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 11-20-2007, 01:06 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO