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  1. #11
    Tenured roisterer SolitaryWalker's Avatar
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    It is true that some people may say they'd rather have one day of great excitement and a day of misery, and so on alternating. I do not think that this kind of a lifestyle will lead them to a point where on their deathbed they could say 'this was a life well lived' or 'I had a happy life'. A person with such an inconsistent lifestyle will not have a solid core, will not know who he/she is. We are shaped by our activities. If they are not consistent we will inevitably be everywhere and nowhere. I think there is nothing worse than in your final years to be forced into a realization you wasted your life on frivolous adventures and you do not even know who you are. Not that the emperor has no clothes, the clothes have no emperor.
    "Do not argue with an idiot. They drag you down to their level and beat you with experience." -- Mark Twain

    “No man but a blockhead ever wrote, except for money.”---Samuel Johnson

    My blog: www.randommeanderings123.blogspot.com/

  2. #12
    Striving for balance Little Linguist's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlueWing View Post
    Axiom: It is a truism that all people want to be happy.

    Definition: Happines is to be defined as a state of prolonged positive emotion.

    Question: How is happiness to be achieved.

    Hypothesis: Through acquisition of inner peace. We are more likely to remain happy if we maintain emotional composure. It is better to stay moderately excited for a long period of time than attempt to seek great excitement. Doing the latter will lead to an emotional instability, as it is difficult to maintain a high level of excitement consistently. In the end we want to be in control over our emotions in order to keep the peace. If we are in control, it will be easier for us to elect how our inner world shall be maintained. In order to acquire such a control, man must be moderate in his passions.

    This is the doctrine famously championed by Aristotle earlier concerning the necessity of moderation. The more man focuses on dispassionate contemplation, the easier it will be for him to avoid strong emotions simply because he shall not focus on them at great length. He shall come to terms with his emotions by dispassionately analyzing them. Once they have been understood, they shall cease to have a force which could disturb his dispassionate contemplation and quest for emotional equillibrium.

    This is how man is to find peace in his inner life. The outer life, however, may prevent him from achieving this, as if there is not an orderly environment around him, he may not be in the position to pursue inner growth. An Ideal society need not necessarily be comprised of deep thinkers, but of individuals who prefer to handle things in a dispassionate way. Akin to what we may call individuals with a Thinking preferrence who use this faculty well habitually. Feelers are undesirable because their relationship to emotion is analogous to that of a magnet to metal. They shall spark passions in all of us rendering emotional equillibrium close to impossible.
    Please define "emotional composure."
    If you are interested in language, words, linguistics, or foreign languages, check out my blog and read, post, and/or share.

  3. #13
    Tenured roisterer SolitaryWalker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Little Linguist View Post
    Please define "emotional composure."
    A static state of passions. Synonymous with the term 'emotional stability'.
    "Do not argue with an idiot. They drag you down to their level and beat you with experience." -- Mark Twain

    “No man but a blockhead ever wrote, except for money.”---Samuel Johnson

    My blog: www.randommeanderings123.blogspot.com/

  4. #14
    Senior Member cafe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlueWing View Post
    It is true that some people may say they'd rather have one day of great excitement and a day of misery, and so on alternating. I do not think that this kind of a lifestyle will lead them to a point where on their deathbed they could say 'this was a life well lived' or 'I had a happy life'. A person with such an inconsistent lifestyle will not have a solid core, will not know who he/she is. We are shaped by our activities. If they are not consistent we will inevitably be everywhere and nowhere. I think there is nothing worse than in your final years to be forced into a realization you wasted your life on frivolous adventures and you do not even know who you are. Not that the emperor has no clothes, the clothes have no emperor.
    I don't agree. I know I'd rather have a quiet, consistent life myself, but I've known people, probably ESPs, who are not really hurt by bad experiences in a lasting way like I would be. They are resilient and live in the moment. They revel in the experiences they've had, both good and bad and don't really seem to have a lot of regret, even in their later years. It's as if they are legends in their own minds. My life, which is more that of an observer, would be an empty, wasted life for someone like that and they would likely deeply regret it. There would be nothing worse for them than to realize they'd lived life on the sidelines, never experiencing it in it's fullness.

    People who are different aren't broken people that would be like us if only they could be fixed. They are actually really different at their core. Life is not One Size Fits All.
    “There are two novels that can change a bookish fourteen-year old’s life: The Lord of the Rings and Atlas Shrugged. One is a childish fantasy that often engenders a lifelong obsession with its unbelievable heroes, leading to an emotionally stunted, socially crippled adulthood, unable to deal with the real world. The other, of course, involves orcs.”
    ~ John Rogers

  5. #15
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    I would submit a thought for further consideration.....that contemplation is not what gives us peace. Contemplation is of value only because it helps connect us to "what is." Connection to this is what gives us peace. In this manner, we do not face the world alone....we are in a partnership with the divine. To me this works even outside a state of inner composure which, humanly speaking, is generally pretty frail.

    I have had the pleasure of knowing some people who had true inner peace...they exuded it. But, it was not something they posessed...in fact if you were to question them on this they would smile and disavow any higher knowledge or state of being. In fact, they were even more aware of their inner limitations, short-sightedness, and failings (although these were not readily apparent to me or others). This, however, didn't matter....the connection was all that did. And this connection was present in their meditation as much as it was out in the noisy streets, and some of these were really noisy!! It's a mystery and an interesting phenomenon to see in people who don't just theorize about inner peace, but live it as a matter of practical experience.

    I have run across this in may types of spirituality, too. My familiarity is more within Christian mysticism where connection to God goes beyond the mere word to "what truly is." Other spiritual traditions use different terms and methods of discribing this reality, but the essential concept seems quite similar. This makes me wonder if it is part of some more global concept/truth.

    Connection to something divine....within us and without us and filling all things...yet personal, loving, and benevolent....this is the path on which people I know of seem to find true peace. It is, though, a hard place for the egotistical and proud to trod because often the peace we seek to possess in the end possesses/captivates us. We merely bask in it's life-giving glow.



    Sheesh....I don't believe it!!! That was the first time I ever used "trod" in a sentence!!!

  6. #16
    Tenured roisterer SolitaryWalker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cafe View Post
    I don't agree. I know I'd rather have a quiet, consistent life myself, but I've known people, probably ESPs, who are not really hurt by bad experiences in a lasting way like I would be. They are resilient and live in the moment. They revel in the experiences they've had, both good and bad and don't really seem to have a lot of regret, even in their later years. It's as if they are legends in their own minds. My life, which is more that of an observer, would be an empty, wasted life for someone like that and they would likely deeply regret it. There would be nothing worse for them than to realize they'd lived life on the sidelines, never experiencing it in it's fullness.

    People who are different aren't broken people that would be like us if only they could be fixed. They are actually really different at their core. Life is not One Size Fits All.
    ESPs have an inner being too, just like you and I. What you say of them is true because they are able to avoid paying attention to their inner life. This doesnt change the fact that they've spoiled it. They can't run from their problems all life long, soon enough they will have to own up to all the stupidies they put themselves and others through.

    In short, we all have an inner being to take care of, only so long you can run from yourself for. The core of the ESP is not Se, but Fi/Ti.(This is the case because introverted functions define who we are. It is what we make of our experiences that is the deciding factor, not what experiences we have. For example, a hypnotized person could experience walking a tight-rope with no recollection. The pure experience as such will hardly affect his life. Yet if I were to consciously walk a tight rope, it may have profound implications on my further psychological development.) By assuming vice versa they run into the 'clothes have no emperor' problem.
    "Do not argue with an idiot. They drag you down to their level and beat you with experience." -- Mark Twain

    “No man but a blockhead ever wrote, except for money.”---Samuel Johnson

    My blog: www.randommeanderings123.blogspot.com/

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by gokartride View Post
    Sheesh....I don't believe it!!! That's the first time I ever used "trod" in a sentence!!!
    I am thinking of treading a different path. I am thinking of leaving the supernatural behind. I will only be able to see it in the rear vision mirror, as I speed forward into the future, .

    The rear vision mirror is a bit like magic as we can see the past just as we look into the future through the windscreen.

    But the supernatural is quite like magic. But it is starting to look threadbare. I am starting to see how the trick is done. I am even thinking of performing magic myself. So I think it is time to get out. I should get out at the top because from here on in, it will be all downhill.

    I can retire from the supernatural with honour - I am no longer seduced - and I have seduced no one.

    Of course I will miss the supernatural for it has kept me company most of my life. Am I ungrateful? Well, I am ambivalent - I am grateful but I want to get out before I turn sour. It is a bit like a marriage coming to an end - I want an amicable settlement not a bitter divorce.

    And the advantage of leaving the supernatural behind is that I am open to the new - I am open to me - and I am open to you.

  8. #18
    Senior Member cafe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlueWing View Post
    ESPs have an inner being too, just like you and I. What you say of them is true because they are able to avoid paying attention to their inner life. This doesnt change the fact that they've spoiled it. They can't run from their problems all life long, soon enough they will have to own up to all the stupidies they put themselves and others through.

    In short, we all have an inner being to take care of, only so long you can run from yourself for. The core of the ESP is not Se, but Fi/Ti.(This is the case because introverted functions define who we are. It is what we make of our experiences that is the deciding factor, not what experiences we have. For example, a hypnotized person could experience walking a tight-rope with no recollection. The pure experience as such will hardly affect his life. Yet if I were to consciously walk a tight rope, it may have profound implications on my further psychological development.) By assuming vice versa they run into the 'clothes have no emperor' problem.
    You would think that, but from what I've seen they can live in the moment their whole lives long, only introspecting when they are in a bind and only until they get out, and die of old age with (maybe) a deathbed conversion and little regret. IOW, what you are saying makes sense *to me* and I'd be inclined to agree if I hadn't seen so much evidence to the contrary.
    “There are two novels that can change a bookish fourteen-year old’s life: The Lord of the Rings and Atlas Shrugged. One is a childish fantasy that often engenders a lifelong obsession with its unbelievable heroes, leading to an emotionally stunted, socially crippled adulthood, unable to deal with the real world. The other, of course, involves orcs.”
    ~ John Rogers

  9. #19
    Don't pet me. JAVO's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlueWing View Post
    It is better to stay moderately excited for a long period of time than attempt to seek great excitement. Doing the latter will lead to an emotional instability, as it is difficult to maintain a high level of excitement consistently.
    You have not supplied any evidence to support this assertion.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Victor View Post
    I am thinking of treading a different path. I am thinking of leaving the supernatural behind. I will only be able to see it in the rear vision mirror, as I speed forward into the future, .

    The rear vision mirror is a bit like magic as we can see the past just as we look into the future through the windscreen.

    But the supernatural is quite like magic. But it is starting to look threadbare. I am starting to see how the trick is done. I am even thinking of performing magic myself. So I think it is time to get out. I should get out at the top because from here on in, it will be all downhill.

    I can retire from the supernatural with honour - I am no longer seduced - and I have seduced no one.

    Of course I will miss the supernatural for it has kept me company most of my life. Am I ungrateful? Well, I am ambivalent - I am grateful but I want to get out before I turn sour. It is a bit like a marriage coming to an end - I want an amicable settlement not a bitter divorce.

    And the advantage of leaving the supernatural behind is that I am open to the new - I am open to me - and I am open to you.
    Do you mean like the supersensual? Your inner world? Or do you mean supernautural: Channeling spirits or astral type experiences?

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