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  1. #11
    Administrator highlander's Avatar
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    I grew up Catholic. I thought the services were rather boring, uninspiring and the views espoused overly conservative. I go to a non-denominational church now, which I think is much better.

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  2. #12
    @.~*virinaĉo*~.@ Totenkindly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SubtleFighter View Post
    It counts if you have switched denominations or if you have gone from a religious person to an atheist/agnostic (or vice versa).

    What religion did you switch to?
    What did you switch from?
    And what was the reason for the change?
    Well, I attended various denominations within the Christian faith, but they were all kind of conservative-valued and kind of evangelical, with Bible inerrancy as a doctrine.

    I eventually shifted to a more theist existentialist or Christian agnostic POV, for lack of better descriptions for it. A lot of it overlaps for me. My broad values didn't really change, but I'm no longer being nickel-and-dimed to death by a lot of specific doctrines that I don't think are universal or that I think are misunderstood or misapplied. There has to be room for intuition within the faith.

    What caused this shift?
    1. Cognitive dissonance -- i didn't think the theology and doctrine I was being told was legitimate actually modeled the life experience accurately.
    2. A need to acknowledge ambiguity in the world.
    3. A refinement of the authorities of the Christian faith -- e.g., my understanding of the Bible and the writings within it and their origins changed.

    I have a certain connection with @cafe that way. I still do pray sometimes, although rationally I'm not sure there is a god listening. A lot of the time, I feel like I've been "shaped" by life (and potentially God) but then left to my own devices as the person I have been shaped to be, simply because that is what I've experienced and I don't want to affirm something that might not be true. But I still pray. The best way to say it is that I'm not sure God is in the building nor ever was, but I'm going to live as in a way that happens to reflect God as he would be if he did exist, as best as I can, as best as I can see it, because I can't do otherwise without experiencing myself as fraudulent.

    My social views are probably far more liberal than the environment I used to be part of, although I feel more like a moderate.

    Quote Originally Posted by Standuble View Post
    That said I'll probably convert again to the Force (probably a Sith but maybe a Jedi as well) if in some likely scenario it was found to exist. A galaxy with lightsabers, sorcery and the potential ability to transcend the universe is much more compelling for me than the generic mechanical space opera.
    I can relate to that.
    "Hey Capa -- We're only stardust." ~ "Sunshine"

    “Pleasure to me is wonder—the unexplored, the unexpected, the thing that is hidden and the changeless thing that lurks behind superficial mutability. To trace the remote in the immediate; the eternal in the ephemeral; the past in the present; the infinite in the finite; these are to me the springs of delight and beauty.” ~ H.P. Lovecraft

  3. #13
    Strongly Ambivalent Ivy's Avatar
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    I grew up in a Primitive Baptist church. Primitive Baptist doesn't mean what most people assume it means- the "primitive" part is supposed to mean "original," like the first Christians. All singing is a capella, baptisms are teens and adults only and by immersion, usually in a natural body of water, and so on. Services usually consisted of people giving their testimony aloud, first the saved men, then the saved women, then the unsaved men, then unsaved women. I don't actually know if that's how the original Christians did things (I sort of suspect not) but that's how this church thinks they did, so that's what they do. Incidentally, the church I went to was primitive in the more usual ways, too- no heat or electricity, no running water (we used outhouses), etc. There was a lot of strife and fighting- my brother and I called them "Lord-offs"- and I think I actually had church-related PTSD from it. I avoided church for a long time but then got the urge to go back. I went to a Quaker church for a while but I didn't really identify with the congregation as much as I identified with the larger church's teachings. I now go to an Episcopal (American Anglican) church that is very Quaker-like, and I identify as both Quaker and Anglican but mostly Quaker. I'm like @cafe in that I'm also kind of agnostic, but the church I go to is very open to questioning.

  4. #14
    window shopper Typh0n's Avatar
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    I've changed many times, but I dont feel like sharing the details.

  5. #15
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    I was educated as a Roman Catholic.

    So my first step at liberation was to free myself intellectually. So I studied philosophy at Sydney University where I learnt to refute the intellectual claims of Roman Catholicism.

    My next step was social where I stopped going to Mass and the sacraments.

    My next step was emotional, where I decided to openly sleep with the woman I loved, against the sexual teachings of the Roman Catholic Church.

    My last and most important step was to understand the moral betrayal of Roman Catholicism. And the moral betrayal of Roman Catholicism was illustrated in the Judicial Enquiry into Institutional Child Abuse in Ireland in 2007, and in the Royal Commission into Institutional Child Abuse in Australia in 2013.

    And now I have developed a critique of Christianity, Islam, Hinduism and the New Age.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ivy View Post
    Services usually consisted of people giving their testimony aloud.
    Personal testimony is a hallmark of protestant churches.

    And personal testimony is the authority in interpreting the New Testament (the Bible) in protestantism. And this form of authority is why there are thousands of different protestant churches.

    And the USA being a predominently protestant country, personal testimony is taken as a form of authority in other areas such as mbti.

    Mbti was made in the USA and so has a strong protestant tinge.

    So personal testimony is taken for granted in the USA as a valid form of authority, while personal testimony is regarded as illusory by science and most of the rest of the world.

  7. #17
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    @Mole

    I presume you enjoy speaking. Perhaps you would sometime provide your critique for me/us regarding new age religions.

  8. #18
    & Badger, Ratty and Toad Mole's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by superunknown View Post
    @Mole

    I presume you enjoy speaking. Perhaps you would sometime provide your critique for me/us regarding new age religions.
    The New Age is not very new. The New Age is a Romantic reaction against the European Enlightenment of the 17th and 18th Centuries.

    So the New Age is a reaction against evidence and reason, freedom and equality.

  9. #19
    window shopper Typh0n's Avatar
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    New age is fluffy bullshit.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mole View Post
    The New Age is not very new. The New Age is a Romantic reaction against the European Enlightenment of the 17th and 18th Centuries.

    So the New Age is a reaction against evidence and reason, freedom and equality.
    Is there no reconciliation to be had between that which is felt and that which is seen?

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