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  1. #1
    No moss growing on me Giggly's Avatar
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    Default Learning the value of money

    Someone I know told me that he had been working since the age of 15 because his father told him that if he wanted anything he had to work and buy it for himself to learn the value of money.

    This made me think about how exactly one would learn the value of money that way.

    It must be assumed that when you work, you suffer, and that suffering is what makes you learn the value of money. So work must be unpleasant, painful or not enjoyable and that is why you value the things you buy with the money you earn from your work so much. Consider the time/blood/sweat/tears/sacrifice etc. you've put into working in order to make that money, you would never waste it, right? Nor would you be careless with the things you buy?

    But what about people who love their job, or who love to go to work? Would they not value the money they make from it?

    I don't know, there's something slightly disturbing about all this and I can't quite put my finger on it.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Giggly View Post
    It must be assumed that when you work, you suffer,


    Found your problem.

  3. #3
    No moss growing on me Giggly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 93JC View Post


    Found your problem.

    Explain?

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    You have created a false dilemma by presupposing that in order to appreciate the value of money one's work must be unpleasant. That has nothing to do with it.

  5. #5
    No moss growing on me Giggly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 93JC View Post
    You have created a false dilemma by presupposing that in order to appreciate the value of money one's work must be unpleasant. That has nothing to do with it.
    yes there was a sort of underlying tone of resentfulness when he repeated what his father said.

    So are you saying that he would love his work and that would make him value the money he made and things he bought?

  6. #6
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    Maybe this acquaintance of yours was molested by his father, and that's why he is so resentful.


    Loving or hating his work has nothing to do with it.

  7. #7
    Administrator highlander's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Giggly View Post
    It must be assumed that when you work, you suffer, and that suffering is what makes you learn the value of money. So work must be unpleasant, painful or not enjoyable and that is why you value the things you buy with the money you earn from your work so much. Consider the time/blood/sweat/tears/ etc. you've put into working in order to make that money, you would never waste that money, right? Nor would you be careless with the things you buy?

    But what about people who love their job, or who love to go to work? Would they not value the money they make from it?
    I've always enjoyed my jobs and working hard. I probably learned more about the value of money when I was getting paid minimum wage. You learn the value of money because you see how hard you have to work to make it. You might love your work but it is still work. You also end up sacrificing certain things in your personal life to progress up the career ladder, which is even easier to do if you love your work. So there is real personal cost involved in making it.

    Valuing money to me is not the same as valuing the things you buy. Some might disagree with me but I think money provides some level of security and freedom. Things you buy are different. For the most part, the money is either gone or spent on something that depreciates. You can spend money on a wonderful vacation and enjoy it as well as have a lifelong memory. I believe experiences are some of the more worthwhile things to invest in. You can also buy stuff. Stuff in my opinion has less value. You get a short boost when you first get it. There are exceptions. I live well below my means and save a lot. I also splurge at times on things that many would think are quite wasteful but it is rare for me to spend a lot on something that I don't use. I have had a nice convertible for the last five years and I love driving it now as much as when I got it, so it's really the experience I bought and not as much the thing. I've definitely gotten value out of what I spent on it.

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  8. #8
    No moss growing on me Giggly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 93JC View Post
    Maybe this acquaintance of yours was molested by his father, and that's why he is so resentful.


    Loving or hating his work has nothing to do with it.
    No he was not molested. Why don't you tell me how you think you learn the value of money?

    Quote Originally Posted by highlander View Post
    I've always enjoyed my jobs and working hard. I probably learned more about the value of money when I was getting paid minimum wage. You learn the value of money because you see how hard you have to work to make it. You might love your work but it is still work. You also end up sacrificing certain things in your personal life to progress up the career ladder, which is even easier to do if you love your work. So there is real personal cost involved in making it.

    Valuing money to me is not the same as valuing the things you buy. Some might disagree with me but I think money provides some level of security and freedom. Things you buy are different. For the most part, the money is either gone or spent on something that depreciates. You can spend money on a wonderful vacation and enjoy it as well as have a lifelong memory. I believe experiences are some of the more worthwhile things to invest in. You can also buy stuff. Stuff in my opinion has less value. You get a short boost when you first get it. There are exceptions. I live well below my means and save a lot. I also splurge at times on things that many would think are quite wasteful but it is rare for me to spend a lot on something that I don't use a lot. I have had a nice convertible for the last five years and I love driving it now as much as when I got it, so it's really the experience I bought and not as much the thing. I've definitely gotten value out of what I spent for it.
    I see! Thank you.

    But why would you learn more making minimum wage than making more than that?

  9. #9
    No moss growing on me Giggly's Avatar
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    Also think about being 15 and not really have a "career" yet.

  10. #10
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    When we did manual work, it was working class. But now we no longer do manual work, manual work is now done for middle-class status.

    For instance, in Canberra we have high tech, up-market gyms almost everywhere. And Canberrans, who no longer do manual work, dress in expensive and fashionable leotards, and do manual work in the gyms as a form of status display.

    So manual work is now longer valued for money, but for status.

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