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  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Giggly View Post
    I can't remember ever not knowing the value of money and the purpose of work. Making money and spending it did not make it feel any more special. But I am not suggesting that the guy in the OP is like me.

    I was going to comment the other day, I believe it is something inherent to our nature.

  2. #42
    No moss growing on me Giggly's Avatar
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    Okay, so I don't think this guy was spoiled. I think it was quite the opposite actually. I'm guessing he was deprived of "things" throughout his childhood, for whatever reason (probably poverty).

    Does living in poverty teach you the value of money, or does it teach you the value of things or does it teach you the value of hard work? Does it teach you anything?

    If it does, can these lessons only be learned by people who have lived in poverty and not by those who've not lived in poverty?

  3. #43
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    Living in poverty teaches you that having money is much more preferable to not having any.


    I don't think being 'spoiled' or not has much to do with this guy's dad having told him to get a job at 15. It really goes back to that very first sentence in that very first post: "Someone I know told me that he had been working since the age of 15 because his father told him that if he wanted anything he had to work and buy it for himself to learn the value of money."

    That's it, it's self-evident. If you want to buy something you better have money. Don't have money? Get a job and make money. I don't understand why it needs to become anymore complicated than that. What does a 15-year-old learn when he is encouraged to get a job?

    - you don't get money for free; usually it requires having a job. Usually that means being an employee.
    - what you do with your money is ultimately up to you; it can buy you all sorts of things
    - if you don't have enough money to buy whatever it is you want or need you will have to accumulate money, which requires the self-restraint to not spend it even though you have it
    - if you spend all of your money you will have to go without whatever it is you want or need until you have acquired more money

    These things are apparent to a kid with even a modicum of intelligence, but there's a difference between knowing and understanding the ramifications of earning money and maintaining a budget and actually having to earn money and maintain a budget.

    So this guy's dad told him to get a job. That's how he chose to go about teaching his kid these life lessons. That doesn't mean he was cruel and wanted his kid to 'suffer': having a part-time job flippin' burgers or whatever isn't glamourous and doesn't pay well but it is hardly 'suffering'. It isn't some "weird rednecky" phenomenon either. It's extremely commonplace, it happens to 15-year-olds all over the place.

  4. #44
    No moss growing on me Giggly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 93JC View Post
    Living in poverty teaches you that having money is much more preferable to not having any.


    I don't think being 'spoiled' or not has much to do with this guy's dad having told him to get a job at 15. It really goes back to that very first sentence in that very first post: "Someone I know told me that he had been working since the age of 15 because his father told him that if he wanted anything he had to work and buy it for himself to learn the value of money."

    That's it, it's self-evident. If you want to buy something you better have money. Don't have money? Get a job and make money. I don't understand why it needs to become anymore complicated than that. What does a 15-year-old learn when he is encouraged to get a job?

    - you don't get money for free; usually it requires having a job. Usually that means being an employee.
    - what you do with your money is ultimately up to you; it can buy you all sorts of things
    - if you don't have enough money to buy whatever it is you want or need you will have to accumulate money, which requires the self-restraint to not spend it even though you have it
    - if you spend all of your money you will have to go without whatever it is you want or need until you have acquired more money

    These things are apparent to a kid with even a modicum of intelligence, but there's a difference between knowing and understanding the ramifications of earning money and maintaining a budget and actually having to earn money and maintain a budget.

    So this guy's dad told him to get a job. That's how he chose to go about teaching his kid these life lessons. That doesn't mean he was cruel and wanted his kid to 'suffer': having a part-time job flippin' burgers or whatever isn't glamourous and doesn't pay well but it is hardly 'suffering'. It isn't some "weird rednecky" phenomenon either. It's extremely commonplace, it happens to 15-year-olds all over the place.
    I thought you were getting out of my thread?

  5. #45
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    Don't worry, I'm done. Adios.

  6. #46
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    Things cost too much money. And I like things. Damn.

    Terrible things happen to good people every day.
    Consequentially, I am not one of the good people.
    I am one of the terrible things.
    .



    Conclusion: Dinosaurs


  7. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by gromit View Post
    ...or for keeping your body healthy!
    The salient point is that now manual work has changed status.

    The change of status serves to conceal the nature of manual work, so gosh 'it's just for keeping your body healthy'.

  8. #48
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    Manual Scripts (Manuscripts) and Manual Work

    Quote Originally Posted by Giggly View Post
    Interesting!
    When manuscripts became the content of books, manuscripts rose in status. And now books are becoming the content of electric media, books will rise in status.

    And in the same way, as manual work becomes the content of fashionable gyms, manual work rises in status.

    So manuscripts (manual scripts) and manual work have both risen in status.

  9. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coriolis View Post
    I prefer exercise that is also work, like walking or riding my bicycle to get somewhere, or chopping wood and doing yard work.
    No one who does manual work for a living does it for exercise.

    It is only when we cease doing manual work for a living do we raise its status to exercise.

    We demonstate we are so free from and so far above manual work that we do it at our discretion in fashionable clothes in order demonstrate our new and higher status.

  10. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by Victor View Post
    The salient point is that now manual work has changed status.

    The change of status serves to conceal the nature of manual work, so gosh 'it's just for keeping your body healthy'.
    Well, I agree that manual labor is no longer the norm for most people in an industrialized culture.

    However, human bodies are "designed" to move, not sit around at desks. So now we need to find other ways to give these bodies of ours healthy levels of physical activity (or face pretty substantial health consequences). People working long hours at low-wage desk jobs might not have time or energy to go to the gym or go running. So I suppose it is a status thing, in that sense.

    Not sure what you mean by "concealing the nature of manual work" though...
    Your kisses, sweeter than honey. But guess what, so is my money.

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