User Tag List

First 23456 Last

Results 31 to 40 of 75

  1. #31
    LL P. Stewie Beorn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    4,805

    Default

    @AphroditeGoneAwry

    I'm sure the Beth Moore stuff was helpful even if I might nitpick at some of it.

    If you want a very clear intelligent explanation of the evangelical/traditional Protestant view of the bible you won't find one any better than the following set of lectures by Dr. D.A. Carson who is a New Testament expert and played a strong role in the translation of the English Standard Version of the Bible. The series places a lot of emphasis on the themes and poetic nature of some of the bible, but Carson also makes clear what parts must be considered historical based on the nature of the literature.

    The series intended for new Christians who are not familiar with the Bible and it takes them from genesis to revelation. It think if you understand how the story of Jesus fits into the broader story of the Bible it makes more sense.

    The videos are up for free at http://thegospelcoalition.org/thegodwhoisthere/

    As for your question, you can call yourself whatever you want, but you won't be considered orthodox by traditional Protestants, Catholics, or the Eastern Orthodox because you can't affirm apostle's creed.
    Take the weakest thing in you
    And then beat the bastards with it
    And always hold on when you get love
    So you can let go when you give it

  2. #32
    LL P. Stewie Beorn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    4,805

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lark View Post
    His book Love Wins covers it, the audiobook adaptation is alright but really an introduction to the book, he has published study guides and other material associated with Love Wins too. His views have divided the evangelical scene in the US and its satellites. It makes a lot of sense, although I wouldnt be a follower of Bell's or subscribe to all his views.

    Yeah well, he lost his church over it.

    I don't know about the merits of the book because I couldn't read more than two pages of his one to two sentence paragraphs.
    Take the weakest thing in you
    And then beat the bastards with it
    And always hold on when you get love
    So you can let go when you give it

  3. #33
    Senior Member UniqueMixture's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    MBTI
    estj
    Enneagram
    378 sx/so
    Socionics
    esfp
    Posts
    3,038

    Default

    You're almost there A. Don't give up. You'll find freedom yet
    For all that we have done, as a civilization, as individuals, the universe is not stable, and nor is any single thing within it. Stars consume themselves, the universe itself rushes apart, and we ourselves are composed of matter in constant flux. Colonies of cells in temporary alliance, replicating and decaying and housed within, an incandescent cloud of electrical impulses. This is reality, this is self knowledge, and the perception of it will, of course, make you dizzy.

  4. #34
    Senior Member Survive & Stay Free's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    MBTI
    ESTJ
    Enneagram
    9 so/sx
    Posts
    21,629

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Beorn View Post
    Yeah well, he lost his church over it.

    I don't know about the merits of the book because I couldn't read more than two pages of his one to two sentence paragraphs.
    I've not read the book, I listened to the audiobook and like I said its not actually a straight adaptation, its more like him talking to you about the book and telling you what appears on the pages and what's written about it afterwards.

    I dont really follow though about the two sentence paragraphs, I didnt know he lost his church over the head of it, its a pretty enlightened religious view so I'm not surprised.

  5. #35
    Senior Member Survive & Stay Free's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    MBTI
    ESTJ
    Enneagram
    9 so/sx
    Posts
    21,629

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by UniqueMixture View Post
    You're almost there A. Don't give up. You'll find freedom yet
    Dont confuse atheism and freedom

  6. #36
    Senior Member UniqueMixture's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    MBTI
    estj
    Enneagram
    378 sx/so
    Socionics
    esfp
    Posts
    3,038

    Default

    Who said anything about atheism?
    For all that we have done, as a civilization, as individuals, the universe is not stable, and nor is any single thing within it. Stars consume themselves, the universe itself rushes apart, and we ourselves are composed of matter in constant flux. Colonies of cells in temporary alliance, replicating and decaying and housed within, an incandescent cloud of electrical impulses. This is reality, this is self knowledge, and the perception of it will, of course, make you dizzy.

  7. #37
    @.~*virinaĉo*~.@ Totenkindly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    MBTI
    FREE
    Enneagram
    594 sx/sp
    Socionics
    LII Ne
    Posts
    42,333

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lark View Post
    I've not read the book, I listened to the audiobook and like I said its not actually a straight adaptation, its more like him talking to you about the book and telling you what appears on the pages and what's written about it afterwards.

    I dont really follow though about the two sentence paragraphs, I didnt know he lost his church over the head of it, its a pretty enlightened religious view so I'm not surprised.
    It was a little more complicated than suggested to you, as he didn't necessarily want to remain in that kind of environment either. This article covers it in a little more detail:

    http://global.christianpost.com/news...parture-85995/

    The American church is a wonderful institution, it is NOT open to alternatives on how to view things -- discussion is not really possible -- and so it almost immediately attacks anyone outside status quo.

    I don't think I've read the book in full, but Bell writes in a very down-to-earth, basic level. Anyone can read it. I guess some people are mistaking simple writing for the broadest market for dumb writing below their level of dignity to bother to peruse.
    "Hey Capa -- We're only stardust." ~ "Sunshine"

    “Pleasure to me is wonder—the unexplored, the unexpected, the thing that is hidden and the changeless thing that lurks behind superficial mutability. To trace the remote in the immediate; the eternal in the ephemeral; the past in the present; the infinite in the finite; these are to me the springs of delight and beauty.” ~ H.P. Lovecraft

  8. #38
    null Jonny's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    MBTI
    FREE
    Posts
    2,486

    Default

    I'm always surprised when I find out someone isn't an atheist. I always give people the benefit of my doubts and assume they don't believe in fairy tales.
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

  9. #39
    failure to thrive AphroditeGoneAwry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    MBTI
    INfj
    Enneagram
    451 sx/so
    Socionics
    ENFj Ni
    Posts
    5,651

    Default Christian Deism~

    Quote Originally Posted by UniqueMixture View Post
    You're almost there A. Don't give up. You'll find freedom yet

    What if I really don't want freedom?




    So, I found three monotheisms that seem to fit what I believe: The Bahá'í Faith-

    (pron.: /bəˈhaɪ/)[1] is a monotheistic religion founded by Bahá'u'lláh in 19th-century Persia, emphasizing the spiritual unity of all humankind.[2] There are an estimated five to six million Bahá'ís around the world in more than 200 countries and territories.[3][4]
    In the Bahá'í Faith, religious history is seen to have unfolded through a series of divine messengers, each of whom established a religion that was suited to the needs of the time and the capacity of the people. These messengers have included Moses, Buddha, Jesus, Muhammad, and others. For Baha'is, the most recent messengers are the Báb and Bahá'u'lláh. In Bahá'í belief, each consecutive messenger prophesied of messengers to follow, and Bahá'u'lláh's life and teachings fulfilled the end-time promises of previous scriptures. Humanity is understood to be in a process of collective evolution, and the need of the present time is for the gradual establishment of peace, justice and unity on a global scale.


    Theistic Rationalism-

    Theistic rationalism is a hybrid of natural religion, Christianity, and rationalism, in which rationalism is the predominant element.[1] According to Thiessen, the concept of theistic rationalism first developed during the eighteenth century as a form English and German Deism.[2] The term was used as early as 1856, in the English translation of a German work on recent religious history.[3] Some have argued that the term properly describes the beliefs of some the Founding Fathers of the United States, including George Washington, John Adams, Benjamin Franklin, James Wilson, and Thomas Jefferson.[4][5]
    Theistic rationalists believe natural religion, Christianity, and rationalism typically coexist compatibly, with rational thought balancing the conflicts between the first two aspects.[4] They often assert that the primary role of a person's religion should be to bolster morality, a fixture of daily life.[4]
    Theistic rationalists believe that God plays an active role in human life, rendering prayer effective.[4][5] They accept parts of the Bible as divinely inspired, using reason as their criterion for what to accept or reject.[6] Their belief that God intervenes in human affairs and their approving attitude toward parts of the Bible distinguish theistic rationalists from Deists.


    and Christian Deism-

    It adopts the ethics and non-mystical teachings of Jesus, while denying that Jesus was a deity. Scholars of the founding fathers of the United States "have tended to place the founders' religion into one of three categories—non-Christian deism, Christian deism, and orthodox Christianity."[8] John Locke and John Tillotson, especially, inspired Christian deism, through their respective writings.[9] Possibly the most famed person to hold this position was Thomas Jefferson, who praised "nature's God" in the "Declaration of Independence" (1776) and edited the "Jefferson Bible"—a Bible with all reference to revelations and other miraculous interventions from a deity cut out.

    Deism holds that God does not intervene with the functioning of the natural world in any way, allowing it to run according to the laws of nature that he configured when he created all things. Because God does not control or interfere with his self sustaining Creation; its component systems work in concert to achieve the balanced natural processes that make up the physical world. As such, Human beings are "free agents in a free world." A "free agent" is someone who has authority and ability to choose his/her actions and who may make mistakes. A "free world" is one which ordinarily operates as it is designed to operate and permits the consequential properties of failure and accident to be experienced by its inhabitants. God is thus conceived to be wholly transcendent and never immanent. For deists, human beings can only know God via reason and the observation of nature but not by revelation or supernatural manifestations (such as miracles)—phenomena which deists regard with caution if not skepticism.

    Although I do believe God is transcendent, I also believe that God is also immanent:

    Although transcendence is defined as the opposite of immanence, the two are not necessarily mutually exclusive. Some theologians and metaphysicians of the great religious traditions affirm that God, or Brahman, is both within and beyond the universe (panentheism); in it, but not of it; simultaneously pervading it and surpassing it.
    I believe that God exists next to us, but within another plane of reality--the other side. And that all that keeps us from allowing God into us and with us, is ourselves. But that God is so intense, this is virtually impossible to do, and takes practice in meditation and transcendence, and feeling worthy of allowing the Divine into your being.



    I am so relieved that I can still call myself a Christian, because I really dig Jesus and his teachings, but I do not feel like I should worship him as God, but consider him as more a mentor and guide to knowing God. In this way I still believe in the holy trinity as well:

    Una trinitas et trina unitas
    Ni/Ti/Fe/Si
    4w5 5w4 1w9
    ~Torah observant, Christ inspired~
    Life Path 11

    The more one loves God, the more it is that having nothing in the world means everything, and the less one loves God, the more it is that having everything in the world means nothing.

    Do not resist an evil person, but to him who strikes you on the one cheek, offer also the other. ~Matthew 5:39

    songofmary.wordpress.com


  10. #40
    LL P. Stewie Beorn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    4,805

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jennifer View Post
    The American church is a wonderful institution, it is NOT open to alternatives on how to view things -- discussion is not really possible -- and so it almost immediately attacks anyone outside status quo.

    Yeah, that's how institutions remain institutions. For evidence of this you can look at the decline of the mainline churches over the last fifty years despite the fact that they were following the broader cultural trend of "openmindedness."
    Take the weakest thing in you
    And then beat the bastards with it
    And always hold on when you get love
    So you can let go when you give it

Similar Threads

  1. Aphrodite Questions the Necessity of So Many Men~
    By AphroditeGoneAwry in forum Politics, History, and Current Events
    Replies: 316
    Last Post: 02-21-2013, 09:41 PM
  2. Oh dear, Argus and the E/I battle.
    By Argus in forum What's my Type?
    Replies: 47
    Last Post: 01-25-2010, 01:32 AM
  3. [MBTItm] A question for all the INTx ladies...
    By Angry Ayrab in forum The NT Rationale (ENTP, INTP, ENTJ, INTJ)
    Replies: 69
    Last Post: 06-21-2009, 11:21 AM
  4. [NT] A Question for All the INTx gentlemen
    By Uytuun in forum The NT Rationale (ENTP, INTP, ENTJ, INTJ)
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 07-17-2008, 09:42 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO