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  1. #1
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    The Three Cultures and the Sacred

    Only spoken cultures have sacred books. By contrast literate cultures don't have sacred books.

    For instance, it was the spoken culture of Islam that created the Koran; and the spoken culture of Christianity that created the Bible; and the spoken culture of Judaism that created the Torah; and the spoken culture of Hinduism that created the Bagavad Gita; and the spoken culture of China that created the Analects of Confucius.

    And this makes sense, for in a spoken culture there is nothing rarer or more valuable than a book, or to be more accurate, a manuscript, and so naturally the manuscript becomes sacred.

    But in a literate culture where tens of thousands of books are created each year, it is impossible to see one book as sacred. No, in a literate culture the literal interpretation becomes sacred.

    But as we move out of the literate culture, which itself moved out of the spoken culture, and into the electronic culture, what will we find is sacred?

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    Senior Member INTP's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Victor View Post
    But as we move out of the literate culture, which itself moved out of the spoken culture, and into the electronic culture, what will we find is sacred?
    "Where wisdom reigns, there is no conflict between thinking and feeling."
    — C.G. Jung

    Read

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    Post Human Post Qlip's Avatar
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    I think you put too much stock in your personal spoken/literate/electronic paradigm as primarily defining of a culture. At least it's too much to assume that people agree with your premises. Maybe you should start a thread on the premises.

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    Only spoken cultures have sacred books. By contrast literate cultures don't have sacred books.
    How can an illiterate culture read and write sacred books?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Victor View Post
    But as we move out of the literate culture, which itself moved out of the spoken culture, and into the electronic culture, what will we find is sacred?
    Excellent question, Victor. What do think the answer is?

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    Analytical Dreamer Coriolis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Victor View Post
    Only spoken cultures have sacred books. By contrast literate cultures don't have sacred books.

    For instance, it was the spoken culture of Islam that created the Koran; and the spoken culture of Christianity that created the Bible; and the spoken culture of Judaism that created the Torah; and the spoken culture of Hinduism that created the Bagavad Gita; and the spoken culture of China that created the Analects of Confucius.

    And this makes sense, for in a spoken culture there is nothing rarer or more valuable than a book, or to be more accurate, a manuscript, and so naturally the manuscript becomes sacred.

    But in a literate culture where tens of thousands of books are created each year, it is impossible to see one book as sacred. No, in a literate culture the literal interpretation becomes sacred.
    What about the Bahai scripture? It was written directly, in a literate culture.

    What about the many Native American spoken cultures? There are individual reflections, famous quotes, historical and cultural descriptions, but few (if any?) widely reverenced texts. Much of what has been written was was recorded by outside scholars for cultural preservation purposes.

    Quote Originally Posted by Victor View Post
    But as we move out of the literate culture, which itself moved out of the spoken culture, and into the electronic culture, what will we find is sacred?
    A BRIEF HISTORY OF MEDICINE

    2000 BC: Here eat this root.

    1000 AD: That root is heathen. Here, say this prayer.

    1850 AD: That prayer is superstition. Here, drink this potion.

    1940 AD: That potion is snake oil. Here, swallow this pill.

    1985 AD: That pill is ineffective. Here, take this antibiotic.

    2000 AD: That antibiotic doesn't work any more. Here, eat this root.
    I've been called a criminal, a terrorist, and a threat to the known universe. But everything you were told is a lie. The truth is, they've taken our freedom, our home, and our future. The time has come for all humanity to take a stand...

  7. #7
    Unlimited Dancemoves ® AgentF's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coriolis View Post
    What about the Bahai scripture? It was written directly, in a literate culture.
    this is true.

    note:
    - it espouses the advancement of science* and its harmony with religion. *including technology :>
    - its sacred texts (not translations, transcriptions or copies--the original texts) can be viewed today at the Baha'i World Center Buildings in Haifa, Israel
    - it was reported as the world's 2nd most widespread religion per Encyclopedia Brittanica.
    (per their 2002 analysis; more recent studies offer an "Other" category, into which the Baha'i Faith has presumably been placed.)
    I may be kindly, I am ordinarily gentle, but in my line of business I am obliged to will terribly what I will at all.
    ~ Catherine the Great


    7w6 ❣ sx/so ❤ physical touch ❥ sanguine 70%, choleric 30% ❦

    Johari.

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    Mojibake sprinkles's Avatar
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    What are you saying I cannot read it because I am a goldfish

    bloop bloop

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by xisnotx View Post
    How can an illiterate culture read and write sacred books?
    Of course they don't, rather there is a sacred priestly caste who can read and write manuscripts. And the priestly clerics read aloud the sacred manuscript to the faithful. We see the remnants of this in church today when the priest reads the gospel aloud to the faithful.

    When of course the printing press was invented 1440 the first manuscript printed as a book was the bible. And the faithful learnt to read the printed bible. And so our spoken culture started to turn into our literate culture by the individual reading of the bible. And this led to the violent split between the aural, spoken culture of catholics and the visual, literate culture of protestants.

    And in moving from a spoken culture to a literate culture, we moved from an aural culture to a visual culture. An interesting remnant of this aural culture remained at my catholic boarding school as our classes and sport and worship were ordered by the sound of a bell - a quintessentially aural way of ordering.

    And interestingly we are now being ordered electronically, with results quite similar to the spoken, aural culture of the past. So everything old is new again.

    And for whom does the bell toll? It tolls for us now, electronically.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by nebbykoo View Post
    Excellent question, Victor. What do think the answer is?
    As we move from a predominantly visual literate culture to an electronic culture involving all the senses, we can only look backwards to our previous aural spoken culture to see what we may regard as sacred.

    And I am immediately struck by the sacred feminine. We see this today with the rise of feminism. My Sovereign is feminine, my Prime Minister is feminine, my Commander-in-Chief is feminine. I myself grew my hair long and wore a sarong as a tribute to the sacred feminine.

    And everywhere I look around Canberra we have upmarket massage parlours. These parlours are introducing us once again to our tactile sense.

    And after being compelled by law to sit still in class and focus visually on the printed text, students go dancing to rediscover their proprioceptive sense. And to break free of the privileged eye, and discover their sense of movement, the proprioceptive sense, they take powerful drugs to put themselves into a deep trance where they love everyone, and everyone love them, as they learn to move freely.

    So literacy privileges the eye, and now the electronic mediums are teaching us to experience all our senses, including the eye.

    But most of all we are replacing the literate individual with the electronic tribe, such as the etribe of Central.

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