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  1. #11
    Boring old fossil Night's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Athenian200 View Post
    I don't agree with that at all. That's the most disturbing thing I've ever heard. That's not even fair. I'm glad you're not in charge of the law, that would be awful. You cannot say that your perception of morality applies to everyone absolutely.

    That is so... irrational, brooding, terrifying an idea.
    Right back at ya.

  2. #12
    mrs disregard's Avatar
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    Default Re: OP

    The intention is there, but its important to note that those afflicted with NPD are created. One can point the moral finger, or one can treat it like a medical disorder: keep that which will accelerate the disorder away and give what will help to stabilise health.

  3. #13
    DoubleplusUngoodNonperson
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    I don't really see the reasoning behind calling someone with borderline PD morally decrepit unless you pick on them for the promiscuity thing, which has more to do with the confusion over people in their lives rather than chastity. The rest of the "B" cluster has at least one classic deadly sin embedded in them.

  4. #14
    Senior Member Nonsensical's Avatar
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    Moral! I watched a show that told a story of how a teacher was very impatient with one of her students, so she, herself, had the child prescribed to Ritalin for ADHD, and he fell into a psychotic state, because the teacher had it take it too much.

    But this is an example of how people are just too impatient, or don't want to deal with variations in behavior, and given the technological advances of this century, they lazily resort to medications, and saying it's all medical..but it's not! Not every kid conforms to sitting quietly all day in a classroom, there are those occasional children who just want to be active instead of stressing their fragile minds all day long on things they may not find interesting.

    Anyways, I'm rambling on, but I have been so angry about this for so long! So there's my opinion, like it or not.
    Is it that by its indefiniteness it shadows forth the heartless voids and immensities of the universe, and thus stabs us from behind with the thought of annihilation, when beholding the white depths of the milky way?

  5. #15
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    What is really interesting about personality disorders such as Psychopathic Personality Disorder or Narcissistic Personality Disorder is that the sufferer thinks there is nothing wrong, and in particular, nothing wrong with them.

    And so they are almost impossible to treat.

    However they do suffer and their lives are failures - but still they can see nothing wrong.

    And of course they make their victims suffer. And quite unsurprisingly they see nothing wrong in this.

    And although it is tragic to say this, it is a mistake to try and help them because no matter what you do, they will continue to make themselves and you suffer.

    Tragically, the best you can do is avoid them.

  6. #16
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    I honestly believe a sentence of one year hard labor (in a group setting) would easily cure most so-called personality disorders. People stir around with their thoughts and make themselves crazy in this fucked up modern world. I'm not referring to real disorders like schizophrenia.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Flak View Post
    I honestly believe a sentence of one year hard labor (in a group setting) would easily cure most so-called personality disorders. People stir around with their thoughts and make themselves crazy in this fucked up modern world. I'm not referring to real disorders like schizophrenia.
    Good on you, Jack Flack.

    But it is probably important to distinguish between personality types and Personality Disorders.

    Personality Disorders are psychoses, while personality types are just that: personality types.

    But they have similar names and so are easily confused.

    For example, there is Psychopathic Personality Disorder and the psychopathic personality. And there is the Narcissistic Personality Disorder and the narcissistic personality.

    See, they sound the same but the Disorders are bona fide mental illnesses.

  8. #18
    mrs disregard's Avatar
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    The individual should be held responsible for all of his actions, but an understanding of the disorder afflicting the individual should be sought by those close to him, for their own well-being.

  9. #19
    Senior Member Anja's Avatar
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    Interesting topic and one that I have pondered.

    I agree with much that is said here.

    There is a great deal of value judgement involved for humans in typing personalities. I try to view them as clusters of symptoms which may or may not hold true. A handy-dandy and quick method to provide a lot of information in shorthand.

    What you say though, cafe, about consequences being a valuable learning tool is spot on. When humans provide the consequences we certainly are apt to look for underlying motives. When the cosmos provides them we call it "bad luck" or "fate."

    But it is my understanding of the way things work that if one is not in tune with the force which works for good and growth there will inevitably be unpleasant results.

    I suppose that observation of natural forces by early religious thinkers was how the concept of sin occurred.
    "No ray of sunshine is ever lost, but the green which it awakes into existence needs time to sprout, and it is not always granted to the sower to see the harvest. All work that is worth anything is done in faith." - Albert Schweitzer

  10. #20
    Senior Member Anja's Avatar
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    I'd like to also add that people with Personalty Disorders can be treated, and if motivated, can alter their behavior. (The "if motivated" is the hook, of course. Someone working with a personality disordered person has to find it and emphasize it.)

    Antisocial Personality Disorder? Who do you think our high profile police, politicians, emergency room personnel, ministers, doctors, war heroes are? Many are flip sides of the coin. They have their place in society as does everyone, I think. They tolerate high levels of stress, aren't bothered by difficult decisions, prefer leadership roles and have a rapid recovery rate from situations which would crush a sensitive.

    The ones who don't hold the line are the ones we read scary stories about in the newspaper. But all around us people with Personality Disorders are making their lives work. And struggling much more than we can know.

    Short of uncontrollable psychosis anyone can learn to build on their strengths, minimize their weaknesses and live a healthy, productive life. But it isn't an easy thing to accomplish and may take years and a lot of help.
    "No ray of sunshine is ever lost, but the green which it awakes into existence needs time to sprout, and it is not always granted to the sower to see the harvest. All work that is worth anything is done in faith." - Albert Schweitzer

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